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7 Social Security MISTAKES that Cost THOUSANDS in Retirement

Unless you'' re planning on making a higher return a higher return than five percent and also a greater return implies higher risk in order for this to function you'' d have to not work past age 62 not attract revenue from taxable resources such as a 401k not live previous 83 and be disciplined enough during all of that not to invest anything that you obtain from the ssa oh and the 5 percent return in the majority of situations you'' re gon na have to pay taxes on that if you'' d like to see more of me please make certain you click subscribe notices i work extremely tough to get what'' s happening out there in the globe of social safety as well as into below for you and by clicking subscribe notices you'' ll get alerted as quickly as i post a video clip additionally inspect out this video clip on the ordinary web well worth of a 62 year old some of the numbers are quite remarkable some not so a lot this is jeff schmidt thanks for enjoying

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Retire Rich: 2023 Ultimate Planning Guide (Step-by-Step)

– What's going on you guys. Welcome back to the channel. So in this video today, we're gonna be going over a ultimate guide to retirement planning in 2021. You already know I got my seltzer here. I gonna go ahead and
crack this bad boy open. And we're gonna get this
video started shortly. So at the end of the day, most
people do not want to spend the rest of their life working. And since your expenses don't
just magically disappear, when you turn 60 or 65 or
whatever that retirement age is you have to do things in order
to plan for your retirement. And so in this video, I'm
gonna go through exactly what you need to know to
start off this process of planning for retirement. This is going to include a
number of different topics. We're gonna talk about, how to tell when you can retire based on your level of income. We're gonna cover three primary ways that people derive
income during retirement, when to start saving for retirement, which is as soon as possible obviously, where to save for retirement? And we're also going to cover, how to make your retirement money last? Now real quick here, guys I just want to say thank
you to today's video sponsor which is T-Mobile.

We're gonna talk about
that more later on guys but I just wanna mention
here that T-Mobile offers their Essentials Unlimited 55 and up plan which is going to be
offering unlimited talk, text and data on two lines
at just $27.50 per line. It is a great option for people who are approaching retirement
age, who are looking to minimize those monthly recurring expenses. Compared to Verizon and AT&T
you can often save around 50% with T-Mobile. Not to mention guys, T-Mobile is the only wireless
company that offers a discount on the 55 and up plans regardless of what state you live in. Other companies like Verizon and AT&T only offer those discounted
plans in Florida. So you may wanna check that out. In addition, if you're thinking
about upgrading your phone and getting the latest 5G technology, 5G is included at no
extra cost with this plan. But more on that later. Now I'm definitely not looking
to waste your time here with this video guys. So I wanna go ahead and
identify who this video is for.

Well, mainly this video is geared towards people who are
approaching retirement age. You're probably not ready to retire but it's something that's on the horizon in the next 5 to 10 years. And you're wondering what things should you be aware of right now, and how can you get your ducks in a row for when you do approach
that retirement age. This video is also helpful
for those who are just looking to prepare for
retirement early on.

Even if you're in your
20s like me or your 30s, there's things you can start doing today that are gonna be relatively painless. And trust me, you're gonna
thank yourself later, when you have a lot of money set aside for your golden years. Now, many hours of research
did go into this video. So I just have three small
favors to ask you here, guys. First of all, if you are sitting there and watching this on your computer, go ahead and put your phone on silence and put it away for a little bit, because you wanna focus
all of your attention on this video, and not be distracted with all those social media apps, you can go back to those shortly. Also guys, make sure you pause the video and grab a pen and paper.

And if you need one, go ahead
and grab a beverage as well. We are gonna be here for a little bit but I promise to you that I'm gonna answer probably
every question you have about retirement planning in this video. So you're not gonna have to jump to like 10 different videos to get all
of your questions answered. Lastly guys, if you enjoy this video just go ahead and drop a like, it shows me that this
information was helpful and I'm not asking you
to like the video now but at some point, if you're
watching it and you say, "Hey, this was pretty helpful." That little thumbs up button
certainly does help out. Lastly, a few quick disclaimers
I have to make here.

I am not a financial advisor. This is not financial advice. You need to do your own research before investing in anything out there. Don't do what some guy on the
internet just tells you to do. I'm not here to sell you any products. I'm not selling any courses
or anything like that. And lastly, I have been
getting a lot of scam comments down below where people
are impersonating me. They're trying to get
people to send money. That is not me. I wanna put up two comments
on the screen here. This is a comment that's from me. And you can see the check mark and the different way that it looks versus this scam comment that
doesn't have those things. So if you're communicating with
someone down in the comments and it's me, make sure I
have that check mark in place otherwise you better
bet that is a scammer, and they're trying to take your money.

Hopefully YouTube does a
better job at policing this but for the time being, it
is utterly out of control. And I don't really know what else to do other than make this disclaimer
in every single video. That being said, guys,
let's get right into it and start off with when can you retire? And to be honest with you guys,
it's a pretty simple answer but the way of figuring this out is a little bit more complicated and we're going to cover that later.

But the truth is when
you're able to retire is when you no longer need
to rely on active income to pay for your expenses. So most people out there have a mortgage, they have car payments, they have different monthly expenses. And so in order to retire, you have to make sure that all
of those expenses added up, and even those unforeseen
expenses that you can plan for. Well, your level of income derived from your different investments needs to be enough to
cover those expenses. Otherwise you may have to go out there and get a different job to supplement your retirement income. And so for most people that may not be the ideal retirement scenario. So short answer here, guys, you can retire when your passive investment
income exceeds your expenses, but the longer answer is there's a calculation we're
gonna use to figure this out, that we'll discuss later in the video.

So next up, what are your different
options for retirement income? Well, this pretty much comes down to anything out there that
can make you money, but there's pretty much three main areas where people derive retirement income. The first one is your personal savings and your personal investments. So maybe you're somebody
who's worked a job for your entire life and you've been slowly
contributing to that 401(k). And then maybe you also
have some IRA accounts. Maybe you have a Roth
IRA or a traditional IRA.

And then beyond that, you might have a nest
egg with your savings. Maybe you have the taxable
brokerage account as well. And the goal is for
eventually all these things to be able to provide income for you to not have to work in
order to pay for your bills. Now, the second area
where people derive income for retirement is social security. However, we've certainly
heard a lot about this in recent years, and I don't
think it's such a safe thing especially for young people
to be reliant on that in the future because
social security is kind of in shambles right now
where we don't know how long it's going to last. However, if you are
approaching retirement age, that may be something you can count on for the time being is deriving income from social security. However, social security
alone, 90% of the time is not going to be enough
money to pay for your expenses unless you're living in like the smallest apartment in your entire city and you pinch every penny. And at least for me that's not my idea of a good retirement.

And just a couple of statistics I wanna share with you guys
here about social security, 40% of those who are 60
and above are 100% reliant on social security as a means of income. And so, like we said, here,
there's three different ways people typically derive income, but most people are just fully
reliant on social security which is something to be worried about. And if you're a younger
person watching this video, you don't want to put
yourself in that situation. Another surprising statistic here is that the social security trust fund based on the current rates is likely going to run out around 2035.

Now, are they gonna let
it run out entirely? Probably not. What they're gonna do is probably decrease payouts over time, which means that those who are reliant on that as income are gonna start making less and less money if they have to decrease those payouts. So that is why you really
don't wanna be in the situation where your reliant on this
social security income as a means to sustain yourself. And then lastly, the third source of retirement income for most people that's becoming less and less common is something called a pension.

Now pensions vary from company to company. In the past, it was
typically a percentage of your highest earning year
basically paid to you in perpetuity until you are passed away. But what they found is that these things are not very
profitable for companies. And it's very rare to
find any companies today that still offer this pension. But if you're an older
person watching this nearing retirement age, you may still have a pension plan to derive income during retirement.

So your best case scenario
here for retirement is that you're deriving income from these three different sources. Number one, personal savings
and personal investments. Number two, social security,
number three, your pension. That's like the perfect
scenario for retirement. However, unfortunately
only about 6.8% of people over age 60 are deriving retirement income from all three of those sources. So the vast majority of people
probably don't have pensions and some unfortunately don't
have any personal savings or personal investments. So that's the big picture right now. And that's why it's very
important to have your ducks in a row and start thinking
about this early on and planning that way. You can try to have a a
three-legged stool here where you're able to derive
income from multiple sources.

You don't want to be fully reliant on social security or fully
reliant on pension income or personal investments, personal savings. You wanna have different
things that are able to generate income for you
that way you're diversified. Because basically people
who are deriving income from one source are balancing
on a one-legged stool. It's not very stable. You wanna have multiple legs
to that stool, ideally three. And of course in that personal investments and personal savings
category, there's a lot of different things that
fit under this category. For most people, it's stocks and bonds but a lot of people also invest in things like real
estate or precious metals. And there's a lot of people who literally will
just put all their money in real estate, build up, you know a portfolio of 30 or 40 units. And then they live off of
that rental income cashflow. So there's many different
ways to skin a cat here, guys but just understand that
your goal here should be to derive money from
multiple different sources and have three legs to that stool. So next up here, guys, let's
answer the question of, when should you start
saving for retirement? Well, short answer as
soon as humanly possible.

Now, what I mean by this is when you're younger and
your expenses are lower. Let's say you're in
your 20s and early 30s. Maybe you don't have kids yet. Maybe you're still
living with your parents. This is your prime opportunity
to put as much money as you can into your 401(k), maxing out Roth IRA contributions, and basically holding onto
as much money as you can and putting it in
something that grows value. Because the main factor in how much money you have in retirement isn't based on how much
money that you invest.

It's how much time you
allow that money to grow. So even if you're in your
20s or 30s watching this, and you're thinking, "I don't really have a ton that I could set aside right now." It doesn't matter how much you put aside, the main factor is the amount of time that you allow that money to grow. So just for an example here, guys if you're looking to have $1
million in your retirement let's say your 401(k) for example you could invest just $300 per
month, over a 40 year period earning the average return
from the stock market. Or if you wanted to do it in 20 years, you would have to invest $1,750 per month. That's almost six times
more money to get you to the same result. So you can either invest
a smaller amount of money for a much longer time or you're going to have
to invest a lot of money for a shorter window of time. So the sooner you start,
the better off you are. And I highly encourage you to check out a compound interest calculator and play around with some of those numbers if you are a young person
watching this video.

If you're already close to retirement age and you didn't do these
things, don't worry. I still have more options for you that we're going
to discuss in a little bit. And again, it's important
to understand that truly it's never too late to start saving and investing for retirement. So even if you are in your
50 and you have no assets, you should still do something. You know, doing something is
better than doing nothing. It's gonna be a lot harder because you don't have that much
time to let your money grow, but it's never too late.

It's just important to
understand the sooner you start the better off you are. So now, let's talk about where you should be saving
money for retirement. And there's a pretty simple
process to follow here that most financial experts agree on and I'm going to teach
it to you right now. So the very first thing you should do before investing your
money in the stock market and opening up different
investment accounts is to set up an emergency fund. And this is just simply a liquid account. It sits there in a online savings account or a savings account at your bank or maybe a certificate of deposit. And so what you want
here is a rainy day fund. So what most experts
recommend is setting aside three to six months of
all of your expenses. So what you wanna do is sit
down on a piece of paper write down every one of your expenses, your car payment, your mortgage,
groceries, utility bills and come up with that figure. Let's say for most people maybe it's $3,000 per month
is their monthly expenses.

Well, I would encourage you to save up six times that expense
in a liquid emergency fund. So your very first step is to have let's say anywhere from
10,000 to $20,000 parked in a savings account
where it just sits there in case of emergency. And then you're not going
to invest that money. You just leave it sitting there. And if you end up taking
money out for an emergency like a car repair or a medical expense, you replenish that fund and
you keep that amount there. And of course, if your monthly expenses
are going up over time, you're going to want to
adjust your emergency fund accordingly to make sure you
keep enough money in there. So that's your very first
step is, begin saving up money for an emergency fund and
aim have three to six months of expenses sitting in a liquid account. The very next thing you should do after you have your emergency fund in place is to take advantage of any employer match with the 401(k).

So if you're not familiar, the 401(k) is an employer
sponsored retirement plan which allows you to take money pre-tax and put it away for retirement. And it also gives you
a pretty nice write-off on your tax return, which is
something else to consider. Now, I don't recommend
putting all of your money into the 401(k) because
it's hard to access it and you'd have to pay taxes and penalties to get that money out. However, if your employer
is offering a company match, you should maximize whatever
they're offering you because that's literally free money. So back before I was a
full-time YouTuber guys, I used to work for a utility company and they didn't have a
pension or anything like that, but they did have a employer match. So every dollar I would put in, they would match me with an
additional 50 cents up to 6%. So what I would do is I put 6% of my paycheck into my 401(k)
and then they matched me 50%. So I got another 3% for free. So, effectively 9% of my total pay was going into my 401(k) every
single week automatically.

So after you have your
emergency fund established, or at least started. You don't have to have
all that money there before you move to step two. You just want to kind of start that and begin putting a little bit over there every single week to build up that fund. The next thing is to take advantage of those employer 401(k) matches. After that, if you have any
high-interest debt, you know like personal loans, credit
card debt, things like that. You wanna pay that debt off next, because the average
return you're gonna see from the stock market is somewhere
around 8 to 10% per year. And so if you have high-interest debt, like let's say you have a
credit card with 25% interest, the most wise move you can
make financially is to pay off that debt because you're
paying way more in interest than you're gonna earn as a return. If you had $1000 invested and you're gonna make 10% in one year, you're going to make $100.

If you have a $1000 on a credit card at 25% interest over
the course of one year you'd pay like 250 in interest. So even though you could invest
that $1,000 and make $100 you're still paying 250 in interest. So overall it's a net loss. So if you have high-interest debt, you got to get that paid down first before you begin investing in other stuff, just because that's your
wisest move financially. So after you have your
emergency fund in place and after you maximize your employer match and then you pay off your
high-interest debt, if applicable the next thing to consider is an IRA.

And in particular, I like the Roth IRA. Assuming you're able to contribute to this based on your level of income. Now I'm not gonna get into
a whole thing here guys on Roth IRA versus traditional IRA. I could probably spend 30 minutes on an entire video talking about that. So for now, we're just gonna
cover some very basic stuff about the Roth IRA. With your 401(k) as mentioned, you're contributing pre-tax income and you get the write-off. However, down the line when
you draw out of that account that is when you pay taxes. With the Roth IRA, you're actually contributing
post tax income. So you've already paid taxes on it, meaning you don't get any write-off. However, if you follow
the rules and you know you start drawing from
that by a certain age you don't actually have to pay taxes on the growth of your money.

So it's a very powerful account and it allows you to grow
your wealth tax free. The other advantage of the Roth IRA is you can pull out your
contributions at any time. So if you were putting a $2,000
per year of contributions into that Roth IRA, every single year, you can pull out those
contributions at any time, tax free, penalty free. You just can't touch the earnings or the growth of your money. So let's say you're putting
money into a Roth IRA. And then 10 years later, you decide that you want to invest in a
business or something. You can pull that money out
and pull your contributions out and not have to worry
about penalties and taxes.

So I liked the Roth because it's flexible, you can choose where you put that money. You can put it in stocks,
bonds, precious metals there's all kinds of different Roth IRAs. And you have access to that money where you can take out your contributions, if you do need to access it. So now assuming that you have
the emergency fund in place, you're maxing out your 401(k), you've paid off high-interest debt, you've maxed out Roth IRA
contributions for the year. After that, that's when
I would put that money into a taxable brokerage account where you're able to invest that money, you're able to touch it
you're able to access it.

The only thing is you pay
taxes on your dividends and taxes on those capital gains. But for the most part, that is the generally agreed upon plan for where you should save
money for retirement, is in these different things
that you have control of. And this is all within that category of your personal savings
and personal investments. As far as your pension goes that's all based on your employer, most of them are not
offering any pensions today. However, if they offer it and it's something you
have to contribute towards, if you expect to stay with
that employer for a long time and make a career out of it,
that is definitely a wise move.

And then you automatically pay into social security if
you are a W2 employee. So that's not really something
you have any choice over. So now let's go ahead
and cover how much money that you're going to
need in order to retire. Well, it's kind of a moving target and it's going to change
based on your lifestyle. I mean, are you looking to live in a one bedroom apartment and
drive a ten-year-old vehicle and you know, eat canned
beans for a living? Or do you want to retire
on a beach in Miami? So it all depends based on your lifestyle.

But there is again, another
generally accepted calculation that financial experts use, to calculate necessary retirement income. And it's something called the 4% rule that I'm gonna teach you right now. Also guys, just a quick reminder, I know I mentioned this earlier, but if you have found any
value in this video so far, a like would certainly be appreciated. It helps this video to be
shared with more people. And if you have any thoughts or questions leave me a comment down below. But anyways let's talk
about this 4% rule now.

Now, as far as the math behind this goes, I'm not going to get into it. If you wanna watch,
there's plenty of videos about the 4% rule that we'll
go into a lot more detail but essentially it's a
very simple calculation. What you're going to do,
is you're going to multiply your desired retirement income by 25. So let's say for example you wanna have $40,000 per
year of income in retirement. If that's how much money you want, you want to multiply that by 25. And that will tell you a rough idea of how much money you should have in your savings and your investments in your personal investment
and savings accounts. So for example, if you
wanted $40,000 per year, you would multiply that by 25 and you would come to the conclusion that you're going to want
to have $1 million saved and invested in these different accounts in order to sustainably derive $40,000 per year from that account
without running out of money.

Now, if you wanna be a
little bit more conservative, there is the 3% rule which
is going to be a multiple of around 33, but anywhere
between 25 to 33 times, your desired annual retirement income is how much money you
should have set aside saved and invested for retirement. So obviously guys, the main thing here is the
less money that you need per month based on your lifestyle, the less money you need saved and invested and the sooner you can retire. That's where that whole
FIRE movement comes from or Financially Independent Retire Early, that's people who live off of
as little money as possible. They save as much as possible and they aim to be retired in their 30s. And they're able to accomplish that by living off of as
little money as possible. I did a whole video on this
called how to retire by 30. If you guys wanna check it out at the end I will include a link down below. So now what I want to
cover here is what to do, if you're somebody who
doesn't have 25 to 33 times their desired annual income in a savings or retirement account.

Maybe you're already in
your 50s or early 60s. And you're saying, "What am I gonna do? I don't have money that's just going to fall out of thin air to put in this account,
what options do I have?" Well, let's cover those right now. The main things that you can do are surrounded by things
that you can control. And the main thing you can
control is how much money you're actually spending
during your retirement. So essentially you have two options.

You can try to make more money or you can try to spend less money. Now I'm more of a fan of
the offensive approach here which is figuring out
how to make more money. And so let's talk about that now. The first thing you could
do is figure out some kind of side hustle that you wanna
start maybe in retirement or maybe you wanna do this
before retirement and save up extra money and take all
that money and invest it. I've done a lot of videos
about side hustles. We're not going to get into them here but just understand that
this right here, this laptop this provides a lot of
opportunities to make money.

And it's certainly not rocket science, and I know a lot of people who in their later years have started
YouTube channels and blogs and these different things that allow them to make extra money on the side. So the first thing you wanna consider is, "Hey, let me look into
starting a side hustle." Second of all, pretty simple, spend less money now, pre-retirement. That way you can save
more money to invest. So if you're in your 40s
or 50s, and let's say for example, you're driving
a brand new luxury car and you're watching this
video and you're realizing, "Oh crap, I'm not
preparing for retirement." Maybe you make some
small sacrifices today, that allow you to save
and invest more money. So maybe you trade that car in and you get an economy vehicle and you take that difference
in your monthly payment, and you put that into your
Roth or your 401(k) instead. Another option, pretty simple, spend less money in retirement. We're gonna cover that
more in a little bit. I'm gonna give you guys some
tips on how you can do that.

And then lastly, option number four not the best one, which
is delaying retirement. Maybe you wanna push it
until age 70, age 75, which will allow you
to stay working longer. It will allow you to contribute money towards retirement accounts
and investment accounts longer and allow that money to
have more time to grow before you have to start drawing. So now what I wanna cover
here is a rough idea of how long your retirement
money is going to last. And I don't wanna sound morbid here guys but the truth is, you want
your retirement money to last until you pass away. And then you also wanna make
sure you have enough money sitting there to cover medical bills, funeral costs, and things like that because most people just
don't wanna be a burden on their family when they pass away.

Where they're out of
assets, they're in debt and then their family
has to scrape together 10 or 20 grand for a funeral. So it's not something that
we like to think about or really talk about but it is something that's important to prepare for. And so your goal here should
be to have enough money that you can have your money outlive you and cover some of those costs and maybe have a little
bit of money to pass on to your family as well,
maybe towards, you know college expenses or things like that. But anyway, let me give you
a couple of pointers here on, how long that money will last in a couple of different
factors to consider. Well, first of all how
long your money will last is going to largely depend
on your investments. Some of them are lower risk and some of them are higher risk. And so if you're investing
in higher risk assets, they may be more volatile but you may also see greater returns. On the other hand, if
you're super conservative and let's say you only put your money in fixed income assets, you may find that you're not taking on enough
risk, and you could find that your money doesn't last
as long as you need it to.

So, one of the main things
you have to understand with retirement is that asset mix. And for most people, it's a
split between stocks and bonds. And so that's the main
thing you wanna focus on is that allocation. If you'll have too much money in stocks and not enough in bonds, you might be taking on too much risk and your portfolio could be very volatile, going up and down in value all
the time, stressing you out. If you're too low-risk you might not be growing
your money fast enough and it might run out too soon. So figuring out that asset
mix is very important. Now as far as that number goes, there's a couple of different
rules of thumb out there, but one that most people agree upon is the 110 or the 120 rule. And it's based on your life expectancy. So, I actually am a fan of the 120 rule, which basically means
you take your current age and subtract it from 120. And that tells you how
much money you should have in stocks and the rest should be in bonds.

So for example, I am 25 years old, I would take 120 minus 25,
and that leaves me with 95. That tells me that 95% of my money should be in stocks and
only 5% should be in bonds. Whereas if we take a 70
year old, for example we would take 120 minus 70,
and that leaves us with 50. And that tells us that
50% should be in stocks, 50% should be in bonds. Now, of course, guys that
is a very basic example and it doesn't take into account your unique personal situation. So for exact numbers I
would actually recommend speaking with a financial
advisor and you don't necessarily have to have them manage your money, you can pay them for a
one-time consultation where you're basically saying,
"Hey I want you to tell me what my allocation should be, and help me understand how
that changes over time." But by far that's one of
the most important factors to consider is your asset
mix or asset allocation? Now in general guys, that 4%
rule that we discussed earlier has been pretty successful,
and most people have found that it lasts them around 30 years, which is a pretty long retirement.

That's about how long most
people expect to be around once they retire. However, the success of that
4% rule is largely dependent on that asset allocation we discussed. Because if you're not
taking on enough risk, and you're only earning
a very small return, you're going to dwindle
that money a lot sooner. Another important factor
to consider is taxation. And this varies based on the types of accounts that you have. As mentioned earlier, the Roth IRA is an account
where you put your money in and you pay taxes on the way in. But when you draw from that account you don't pay any taxes. Whereas with the 401(k)
it's tax-free going in but when you come out, you're
actually going to pay taxes.

So this tax situation
is largely dependent on your own investment accounts. Maybe one person has all
of their money in a Roth and somebody else has all
of their money in a 401(k). Those are vastly different tax situations. And this is a scenario again
where a financial advisor can look at this for you, and help you with some tax planning. And you can understand what
are the tax implications associated with your
different investments. So now that you have a
general idea of the factors that will tell you how
long your money will last, let's talk about some different ways to make your retirement money last longer. So the first thing you can do to make your money last longer, which is getting more and more popular is something called downsizing. So most people end up having a home where they raise their kids. And let's say that you're still
together with your spouse. You may now be in this situation where you have this three or four bedroom house, you're paying to heat all those bedrooms.

And you're maintaining this big house, when you're only utilizing
like 25% of that space. Even if your mortgage is paid off, you're still paying for
utilities and landscaping and things that on a much
larger property than you need. So you could downsize into an apartment or downsize into a smaller house. That's becoming more and more popular with the goal of reducing
your fixed monthly expenses. Another option, going back
to the side hustle idea, maybe you Airbnb, a part of your home or you do one of your bedrooms
or something like that, to figure out how to generate
income from that unused space.

But downsizing is a very popular option. Another one is reducing
your fixed expenses like your car payment, as
well as things like your utility payment and things
like your phone bill. So this is where I wanna
talk more about our sponsor for today's video, which is T-Mobile, because they have specific wireless plans designed for people in
retirement to save you money on those fixed monthly costs. So, 55 and up customers who live anywhere in the United States, not just Florida are able to get two lines
of unlimited talk, text and data on T-Mobile's network,
starting at under $30 each.

Which if you have an existing phone plan you have a general idea
of what you're paying, and I can tell you guys right now I'm paying a heck of a lot
more than $30 per line. Now you might be wondering if you're getting some really
cheap plan in the process and the answer is no. In fact, it comes with a lot
of different bells and whistles and extra perks. For example, it comes with the industry's best scam protection, unlimited
3G mobile hotspot data, international texting, no
annual service contracts, your very own dedicated
customer service team, as well as additional
free items here and there and discounts every single
week through T-Mobile Tuesdays. So oftentimes if you
switch from a carrier like, AT&T or Verizon, over to
T-Mobile with this plan, you could save upwards of
50% every single month. And while it may not sound
like a lot of money upfront when you factor in that cost
over the next 20 or 30 years, these little things you
can do to save money on those monthly expenses
really are going to add up. So if you are interested
in those 55 plus plans through T-Mobile, switching
carriers is very easy.

If you're ready to make the switch, you just have to stop
into a T-Mobile store, or you can call 1800 T-Mobile or visit T-mobile.com/55, and I'll go ahead and
include links to all of that as well as the phone number down below, if you guys wanna go
ahead and take advantage of those discounted plans. Now another thing you can do
to make your retirement money last longer is falling
into that category of delaying your retirement. You can also delay taking social security, and this can lead to you having
a larger monthly benefit. So for every year that you wait, you're going to get an
additional 8% in social security, every single month. And if you wait until age 70
to start taking social security you can get up to 24%
more every single month. So if you can delay retirement, and delay taking your
social security benefit, that can result in
additional monthly income. Another great strategy is exactly what we're talking about here, which is having a retirement spending plan before you stop working.

So you do things in advance
to get your ducks in a row. You cut down on recurring monthly expenses like your phone bill,
maybe you take advantage of something like
T-Mobile's 55 and up plans. Maybe you downsize, or you
decide to Airbnb a spare room as us as a side hustle. You just start planning early on before you hit retirement
age, and then you think, "Okay, I haven't planned for this at all. Let's get something going." You're better off to plan in the beginning and get your ducks in the row early. Another suggestion that I have is utilizing credit card reward
points, because a lot of people in their later years want
to travel during retirement. We're in a unique situation right now with the global pandemic,
but once it's safe to travel, that's a popular thing
in your retirement age is seeing the world.

Well, if you're able to
effectively use credit cards and get free points for
travel or free miles, that's another way to get
more bang for your buck. And as long as you're not paying interest on those credit cards and you're paying them
off every single month, I would highly recommend utilizing
credit card reward points and bonuses for travel. Lastly, one of the
things that you can do is make investments in your health to make sure that you're
not having a lot of medical stuff coming up in retirement.

Hopefully you have some
plan for health insurance. So let's say now that worst case scenario, you're somebody who is
in retirement right now and you're slowly realizing that you're going to run out of money. You don't have enough for that 4% rule and maybe you only have
one leg to your stool, which is social security. What options do you have available to you, if you know, you're going to fall short? First of all, as covered
earlier, you can reduce expenses or pick up a part-time job or side hustle.

A lot of people in
retirement end up working 10 or 15 hours per week on the side. Number one for something to do, and number two, just to
have extra spending money. Another option is to tap
into the value of your home with a home equity line of
credit or a reverse mortgage. That's pretty complicated, not gonna get into that
too much in this video, but if you want to hear more about that leave me a comment down below, and maybe I'll do a whole video talking about the reverse mortgage. Another option that you may explore is, if you have a life insurance policy, you may be able to tap into the value of your life insurance policy and get something called the cash value, if you draw on that early. Again, complicated subject
maybe a topic for another video but if you have a life insurance policy, you should sit down
with a financial planner or financial advisor and ask
them about those options.

And one thing I want to mention here is, if you're somebody who's in retirement and you know that your
money supplies dwindling, don't ignore this problem. There are things that you can do. The longer you wait the
worst it's going to be. So I would start addressing
these issues now. So just to wrap up here guys, one of the main things
that I want to recommend as a call to action is it
may be worthwhile to sit down with a fee only certified
financial planner.

It's gonna cost you a couple
of $100 out of pocket, but they're going to be
able to help you answer a lot of questions you may have, such as asset mix, asset allocation. There'll be able to look at your different retirement accounts
and help you understand the tax implications,
because on the surface retirement planning is pretty simple. It comes down to your
expenses, your income, your lifestyle needs, and basically what you're looking to get
out of your retirement. But when you look into
the individual details that each person has with
their different accounts, that's where it becomes more personalized and more complicated. So I think you're going
to get a lot of value out of a fee only
certified financial planner that you pay an hourly rate to, that way you can get unique information about your personal financial situation. At the end of the day here guys, if you fail to plan, you're
essentially planning to fail.

And I want to discourage
you from doing that. This isn't the most exciting topic and it's certainly not on
the top of my to-do list but retirement planning is very important. So I encourage you to take
action on this advice today. I thank you so much for
watching this video. I hope you've got a
lot of value out of it.

Let me know down in the
comment section below what your thoughts are on this. And if you made it to the
very end, let me know too because I'm always curious
how many people stick around for full videos. Lastly, one last, thank
you here to T-Mobile for sponsoring this video. I have a link down below, if you wanna check out
T-Mobile's essentials, 55 and up plan, which is a great option to minimize your monthly recurring
expenses in retirement, to make sure that money lasts longer. If this is your first time
seeing me make sure you subscribe and hit that bell for
future notifications, and on that I hope to see
you in the next video.

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Can I Retire at 55? Tips for Early Retirement

If you'' re thinking about retiring at 55, you intend to beware concerning where you obtain your advice and support, which'' s since a lot of retirement guidance is geared toward those who retire quite a bit later, as a matter of fact … Most individuals retire at 62, yet things will be various for you if you'' re going to retire at'55. That'' s what we ' ll talk concerning for the following pair of minutes right here, we'' ll go over where you can get the cash from, and just how that functions with tax obligations as well as health care, then we'' ll appearance at some real numbers and also what it might look like for someone who retires at age 55. We might likewise intend to obtain philosophical simply quickly and ask the question, Why age 55? Yes, it'' s a good round number.And there are some fascinating tax methods that are readily available around that age, however allow ' s state you could retire a little earlier at 54, would certainly you wish to make that take place? Or if you worked a couple of more years … I recognize you ' ll believe this is insane, yet if you'functioned a number of even more years and also you could not influence your finances, but still take a few of those dream holidays as well as hang around with loved ones, would certainly that be worth it to maybe function until 59, for instance? So we want to figure out specifically why you are pursuing a specific goal and after that we can boost the opportunities of success for you, so let ' s begin with wellness insurance coverage, this is a challenging one because you'' re retiring a fair bit earlier than lots of people that could be near that Medicare age, so you have a variety of different options to continue being covered, and also it is an excellent concept to have actual medical insurance coverage simply in case something happens.So a couple of your options include, top, you can continue your present advantages from a job if you have them for as much as 18 months in many instances, and that ' s under COBRA or your state ' s continuation program, that can get quite pricey due to the fact that you ' re mosting likely to pay the full price', if you weren ' t currently doing that, plus possibly a teensy little bit additional for administration, but it is a way to proceed with the program that you currently have, to ensure that can be handy if you are mid stream in certain treatments or if it ' s mosting likely to be hard to get certain benefits that you currently have on a different health and wellness care program, however, that ' s not normally a long-term service due to the fact that we need to obtain you till age 65, which is when the majority of people enroll in Medicare, as well as you must see your prices drop a fair bit at that factor, perhaps depending on what occurs, so one more solution that a great deal of people check out is getting their own insurance coverage, which happens generally via a medical care industry or an exchange, and also that ' s where you just by coverage with an insurance policy company.So you can go straight to the insurance providers, yet it ' s typically a great suggestion to undergo … Begin at healthcare.gov,

and also after that experience the industry or the exchange, which means you can go shopping some strategies as well as potentially, depending upon your revenue, you can possibly obtain some cost decreases that make it a great deal extra inexpensive, I ' ll talk much more regarding that in a second, yet an additional choice is to switch over to a spouse ' s plan, if you occur to be wed which individual has coverage that ' s going to proceed'for whatever reason, that may additionally be a solution for you, when you leave your'job, maybe a certifying occasion that allows you to get on that person ' s program, however allow ' s chat even more concerning conserving cash on healthcare expenditures before age'65, the majority of individuals are going to get a policy based on the aspects that are most vital to them, to make sure that could be the costs or the out of pocket optimum, the deductible, the co pays, specific locations of protection, all that kind of point, you can pick a plan that fits your needs.Now, you could locate that those often tend to be fairly costly, as well as so if your revenue is listed below particular degrees, you may be able to get successfully a reduction in the costs, it may be in the form of a tax obligation debt or an aid, so right here ' s just a preview of just how things can seek you, let ' s claim your income is, allow ' s say 50,000 in retired life, and'you need to look at specifically what income means, yet there is no insurance coverage readily available from a spouse, we ' ve obtained one adult, and also let ' s claim you are … As our video recommend age 55 below, so you may obtain an advantage of roughly 422 a month, suggesting you might invest that much less every month, which ' s mosting likely to make it a great deal easier to pay for'insurance coverage on these plans, if we switch your income down to 25,000 per year, the assistance is also bigger, so as you can see by varying or regulating your revenue, as well as this is something you might have some control over if you retire at 55, you can additionally control your healthcare expenses, we ' ll talk about some conflicting goals here, where you may not wish to definitely lessen your income throughout these years, however this is essential for you to understand if you ' re mosting likely to be paying for your own insurance coverage, as well as if you'' re experiencing sticker label shock when you see the prices …'By the means, I ' m going to have a web link to this and also a bunch of various other sources in the summary listed below, so you can have fun with this same calculator yourself.Now, once you ' re on Medicare, the expense must go down a fair bit, this is a calculator from Integrity where we can'say, let ' s state you are a woman, and we ' re going to claim you ' re eligible for Medicare at this point, so we'' ll bring you'approximately age 65. It is mosting likely to be quite a little bit greater expense,'if you look at it prior to age 65, which ' s due to the fact that you are paying for those personal policies from insurer, allow ' s claim you ' re mosting likely to live until age 93, therefore you may expect to invest approximately 5800 6000 dollars per'year, depending on your wellness as well as your area and also various other aspects, it might be essentially, but this is a price quote of what someone may invest, a solitary female each year in retired life, naturally, that number is going to boost annually with rising cost of living and also deteriorating wellness issues. This is a ball park estimate of what you might be investing in the future, now we get to the inquiry of, do you have the economic resources to retire at 55? Which comes down to the earnings and also the possessions that you ' re mosting likely to draw from to offer the resources you require to buy the important things you'want as well as require, and also one method to look at this is to claim We intend to avoid early withdrawal fines due to the fact that once more, you are retiring at an age that ' s earlier than the regular senior citizen and also a lot of retirement accounts are made for you to take withdrawals at 59.5 or later on, to stay clear of those fines, the good news is, you have a number of options, so with private and joint accounts, simply taxed brokerage firm accounts, you can normally withdraw from those with no charges, however you might have funding gains taxes when you sell something, those taxes might go to a lower price than you would certainly pay if you take big withdrawals from pension, yet you just wish to double and also three-way check that, yet that can be a fluid resource of funds.You. Can also generally take out from Roth accounts pretty conveniently. So those routine payments come out initially, simply put, you can draw out your normal payments at any type of time without taxes as well as no penalties, what that indicates is that ' s the yearly restriction payments you may have been making her by year, so the 7000 per year, as an example. That cash would be easily obtainable, but if you have various other money types like Roth conversions, for example, you ' re going to be really careful and get in touch with your certified public accountant and also discover out what every one of that could look like. There. Are various other methods to access funds that are within pre tax retired life accounts, as well as it might actually make good sense to draw on those somewhat, we ' ll talk a lot more regarding that in a minute, yet these are a few of the tricks you can make use of to stay clear of an early withdrawal charge yet still attract on those assets prior to age 59.5. The very first one is the so called guideline of 55, so this uses if'you work at a work with, allow ' s state a 401K, as well as you quit working at that company at age 55 or later, if you fulfill particular requirements, after that you can withdraw those funds from the 401k so they go straight from the 401k to you.They wear ' t go over to an individual retirement account, you could withdraw those funds without a very early withdrawal fine. A difficulty below is that not every employer allows you to do that, so 401k strategies can establish a lot of their own guidelines, as well as among them could be that they wear

' t allow you just call them up and take cash whenever you desire, they may make you … Withdraw the whole amount, so if that ' s the situation, this isn ' t going to work, so make sure to triple contact your employer and also the plan vendors as well as figure out exactly just how this would certainly function logistically or if it will also function. Next, we have SEPP that stands for significantly equivalent periodic repayments or rule 72. This is a chance to attract funds from, let ' s say your IRA or a certain IRA that you choose, but prior to age 59 and also a half without getting early withdrawal penalties.Now, this is not my preferred selection. I don ' t always suggest this extremely typically in all, as well as the reason is because it ' s simple to slide up and also end up paying tax obligation charges. The factor for that remains in part that it ' s truly rigid, so when you establish this, You compute a quantity that you have to take out yearly, and also it has to be the'very same quantity every year, as well as you have to make certain you do that for the longer of when you turn age 59 1/2 or for five years. And also also that seems type of simple, yet it ' s still simple to trip'up, and you likewise have to stay clear of making any type of modifications to your accounts, so it ' s simply truly rigid as well as can be hard to stay with you, so … Not my favorite option, but maybe a choice. Those of you who work for governmental bodies, maybe a city company or something like that, you could have a 457b strategy, as well as those strategies do not have early withdrawal penalties prior to 59 as well as a half, so you can withdraw cash from that as well as utilize some income, pre pay some taxes, and also have some money to spend relatively conveniently, this incidentally, is an argument for leaving cash in your employer ' s 457 versus rolling it over to an IRA, because once it visits an IRA, you undergo those 59 1/2 policies and a possible early withdrawal penalty.So that could end up leaving you with 72 to deal with, as an example, which once more is not optimal. You might be asking, well shouldn ' t I just reduce'tax obligations and also hold off on paying taxes for as long as possible? As well as the response is not necessarily. It can make sense to go ahead and also pre pay some taxes by obtaining calculated, the reason for that is that you will at some point have to pay tax obligations on your pre tax cash as well as it could occur in a huge lump, as well as that can bump you up right into the highest tax obligation brackets, so it can be far better to smooth out the price at which you attract from those accounts as well as with any luck keep yourself in reduced tax obligation brace, at least reasonably speaking.So when your RMDs or your required minimum distributions kick in after age 72 under present regulation, that could potentially bump you up into the highest tax obligation brackets, possibly you want to smooth points out as well as take some income early. So let ' s take a look at the inquiry of, Do you have enough with some specific numbers, and prior to we eye those numbers, just wish to mention that I am Justin Pritchard. I help individuals prepare for retirement and also spend for the future. I ' ve got some great resources, I think, in the description below, several of the important things that we ' ve been chatting regarding right here today, as well as some general retired life intending information. If this is on your mind, I believe a great deal of that is going to be really useful for you. Please have a look at that and also allow me recognize what you assume of what you discover. It ' s also a great time for a pleasant pointer, This is simply a brief video clip, I can ' t possibly cover whatever. Please three-way and quadruple check'with some experts like a Certified public accountant or a financial consultant before you make any type of decisions, so allow ' s get back right into these questions, Do you have enough? As we constantly need to discuss, it depends upon where you are as well as exactly how much you invest as well as how things benefit you.Are you fortunate to retire into a good market, or are you unfortunate and also retiring into a negative market? All of these different facets are mosting likely to affect your success, but allow ' s jump over to my monetary preparation tool and also take a look at an instance. This is just a theoretical example, it ' s the world ' s most over streamlined example, so please keep that in mind, with a genuine individual, we ' ve got a lot much more taking place. The world is a complex place and

points get messier, however we ' re keeping it very easy below, just to chat about an instance of how things might look, so he or she has one million in pre tax possessions as well as 350,000 in a brokerage firm account, as well as if we just swiftly look at their dashboard right here, quite high likelihood of success, so allow ' s make it'a little bit'extra interesting and state … Maybe that individual retirement account has, let ' s state, 700,000 in it. What is that going to do? As well as incidentally, this is still a great deal greater than a great deal of individuals have, but once more, if you ' re going to be retiring at 55, you usually have rather low expenses and/or a great deal of assets.So let ' s remember here that retirees wear ' t always invest at a flat inflation changed level, and I ' ll get right into the assumptions below in a second, yet let ' s just take a look at if this individual spends at rising cost of living minus 1 %using the retired life costs “smile,” that significantly improves their opportunities, and I ' ve obtained video clips on why you may consider that as a potential reality, so you'can check into that later on at your leisure, yet as for the presumptions, we presume they spend about 50,000 a year, retire'at age 55. The returns are 5.5 %per year, and also inflation is 3%per year. Wouldn ' t that be freshening if we got 3%… So we eye their earnings below age 55, absolutely nothing', and afterwards Social Safety and security starts at 70. They ' re doing a Social Safety and security bridge method. I ' ve got video clips on that particular as well, or at the very least one video, the complete year starts here later, and also after that their Social Protection change for rising cost of living, considering their taxes, we have absolutely no taxes in these earlier years since they are just not pulling from those pre tax obligation accounts. Maybe not getting much, if anything, in regards to capital gains,'perhaps their reduction is wiping that out, so we might have a possibility right here to in fact do something and also once again, pre pay some tax obligations and pull some taxed revenue'forward.In reality, if we eye their federal income tax bracket, you can see that it ' s fairly reduced from 55 on, possibly they desire to draw some of this earnings ahead to ensure that later on in life, they are drawing whatever out of the pre tax obligation accounts simultaneously. It just depends on what ' s essential to you and what you intend to attempt to do, and that brings us to some tips for doing calculations, whether you are doing this with somebody, an economic coordinator or on your own, you intend to consider that space in between when you quit working as well as when your earnings advantages start from, allow ' s say, Social Protection, there ' s also that space between when you stop functioning and also when Medicare starts, and also that ' s an additional essential thing to check out, yet what are your approaches available there? Should you take some income, and precisely how much? That ' s going to be a location where you might have some control, so it ' s worth doing some excellent planning.We also desire to look very closely at the inflation and also investment returns, and also what are the assumptions in any kind of software application that you ' re making use of? These are truly important inputs and also they can considerably transform what takes place …'You saw what happened when we switched over from a level rising cost of living modified boost annually to the retirement costs smile, simply a refined little adjustment has a big distinction on how points unfold, as well as in that circumstance, by the means, we would normally have healthcare boosting at'a much faster rate.But like I said, we use an over streamlined example and didn ' t necessarily consist of that in

this case, yet you do intend to click via or ask concerns on what exactly are the presumptions and also are you on board with those assumptions?'You might additionally need to make some changes, and also this is just the fact of retiring at an early age when you may have 30 plus years of retired life left, a lot can happen, and there really is a whole lot of benefit to making small changes, particularly during market collisions, for example, so. If things are not necessarily going terrific, some little tweaks might possibly enhance the possibilities of success considerably, that might imply something as easy as avoiding a rising cost of living modification for a year or 2, or maybe dialing back some holiday spending.These are things you put on ' t intend to do, that ' s for certain, however with those little changes, you can potentially keep things on the right track, and that method you put on ' t need to go back to function or make bigger sacrifices. And also so I wish you located that valuable. If you did, please leave a fast thumbs up, thanks as well as take treatment.

Yes, it'' s a great round number.And there are some intriguing tax obligation approaches that are available around that age, however allow ' s state you could retire a little bit previously at 54, would certainly you want to make that occur? A problem below is that not every company allows you to do that, so 401k strategies can set a lot of their own policies, and one of them might be that they wear

' t allow you just call them up and take cash whenever you want, they could make you … Withdraw the whole quantity, so if that ' s the case, this isn ' t going to function, so be sure to three-way check with your employer and the plan suppliers and locate out precisely just how this would certainly work logistically or if it will certainly also function. It simply depends on what ' s important to you and also what you desire to attempt to do, as well as that brings us to some ideas for doing estimations, whether you are doing this with somebody, an economic planner or on your own, you want to look at that space between when you stop working as well as when your revenue benefits start from, let ' s claim, Social Protection, there ' s also that void between when you quit functioning as well as when Medicare starts, and that ' s one more essential point to look at, but what are your techniques readily available there? That ' s going to be an area where you might have some control, so it ' s worth doing some excellent planning.We additionally desire to look very closely at the inflation and also financial investment returns, and what are the assumptions in any software that you ' re using? If points are not necessarily going great, some little tweaks might potentially enhance the opportunities of success significantly, that might mean something as straightforward as skipping an inflation adjustment for a year or two, or possibly calling back some trip spending.These are points you wear ' t want to do, that ' s for certain, yet with those little changes, you can potentially keep points on track, as well as that way you put on ' t have to go back to work or make larger sacrifices.

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Suze Orman Gets You Ready For Retirement | Money

I am the one and only Susie Orman, and my goal is to make you as independent from financial advisors as possible, because you are never going to be powerful in life until you are powerful over your own money. And my job is to make sure you can achieve just that. So rather than asking more from your money that it can't give you, you have to ask less of your spending habits from yourself which means you have got to get rid of all credit card debt. All debt. Total debt of car loans, mortgage debt, all debt that you have has to go. So one thing that you have to look at is if you have a debt, that is your sign that you can't afford to retire. Maybe you retire from the job that you currently have, but then you have to get some side hustles or something. So my best advice to you is start living below your means but within your needs.

How do you do that? From this day forward, every time you go to make a purchase, ask yourself a question, 'Is this a want or is this a need?'. If it's a want, please don't purchase it. If it's a need, you have to buy it. It's just that simple. You know, a lot of you, when you're approaching retirement, you look at your portfolio and usually your portfolio is this: you have a 401 9k), 403 (b), a Thrift savings plan if you work for the government or whatever, it may be, the military. And now you've retired and now normally you would then do an IRA rollover with that money. But now you're 'Oh my God, what should I do? I never invest in money before, really. I've just put money in every single month into these mutual funds. And now I don't know what to do.'. If you are going to be withdrawing money from your retirement account to pay for your everyday expenses, you have to know that you have — ready for this, everybody — at least three years of expenses in cash, earning you a high interest rate or whatever the highest interest rate is that you can get.

The rest, at this point in time, should really be diversified into high-yield dividend-paying either stocks or exchange-traded funds. If you need really short term money and you want to get a higher interest rate for very short term money, right, I don't have a problem with bills. And, you know, I myself will put a serious sum of money protected in bills because if you're investing more than $250,000, then you really have to go to a variety of banks in order to get FDIC insurance — or even credit unions.

So if you have a large sum of money of $1 – $3 million that you just want liquid, then I use Treasury bills for that. I don't have a problem with that at all. And they keep rolling over but I know that they're guaranteed by the taxing authority of the United States government. If we're talking now, though, about amounts that are $250,000 or below, I think that you're far better off, right here and right now, putting the money in a high-yielding savings account.

So for smaller amounts of money, savings account. For $250,000 or above that you want liquidity and the highest interest rate, I don't have a problem with Treasury bills. You don't have the documents in place today to protect your tomorrows. You don't have a will. You don't have a living revocable trust. You don't have an advance directive and durable power of attorney for health care. And you don't have a power of attorney for finances. You need those things not just to make sure that your assets pass freely to your beneficiaries. You need those things for you. So here you are now and your spouse has died. Who, as you get older, who's going to write your checks for you? Who's going to pay your bills for you? If you get sick, you have an incapacity, who's going to do that? So it's very important that you get the documents that are correct.

Long-term care insurance, if you can afford it, will absolutely protect your little nest egg if one of you ends up in a nursing home. One out of three of you will spend some time in a nursing home after the age of 65. So look around and if you decide to buy long-term care insurance, the perfect age to buy it is really in your 50s. But here's the key. You better know that you can afford a long-term care insurance premium because they're not cheap. From the age of when you buy it all the way until at least 84 because it makes no sense for you to purchase it. Pay for it in your 50s, in your 60s. Now here you are in your mid 70s, you can't afford it anymore and then you drop it. You're better off just not buying it at all. Let me just put it to you bluntly. You are to stay as far away from a reverse mortgage as you possibly can. There is not one situation out there where you should be getting a reverse mortgage.

A reverse mortgage is based on the interest rates that are in effect right here and now. It's based on your age. And it just makes no sense. If you own a home and you can't afford to stay in that home — with real estate prices as high as they are — you could just sell your house right now and either seriously downsize, or there is nothing wrong with renting..

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What Is The 4% Rule? How Much Money Do I Need To Retire?

In this video, I want to explain the 4% rule. This is also known as the Safe Withdrawal Rate – or basically the rate at which you can spend your money without ever running out of money. An easy way to calculate what this means for you – and how much money you’ll need to retire is by flipping it around and multiplying your yearly expenses by 25. For example, if you and your family spend $40,000 per year, you’ll need to have 1,000,000 invested to not run out of money.

There must be some limit to how long you can withdraw 4% and still have money left over, right? The study that explains the 4% rule is called the Trinity Study, and it looked at how much money you’d need to retire for every year between 1926 and 2009. The study found that if you invest 50% of your money in stocks and 50% of your money in bonds, withdrawing 4% of your money will be fine for 25 years, 100% of the time. Doing it for 30 years – you’ll still have money left over 96% of the time. only if you retired in a very unlucky year and never made any money after retirement including pensions or social security – the 4% rule didn’t work. So to make sure we’re all clear – the 4% rule isn’t 100% foolproof.

But those odds are pretty darn good – and even while I hope to retire from regular work longer than 30 years – i know I’ll continue to make money doing things i love which will make sure that the 4% rule does succeed. For those of you that want to be 100% sure your money will never run out (especially for those of you who plan to retire longer than 30 years), use the 3% rule and only withdraw 3% of your investments per year.

Let’s get back to the 4% rule and dive a little deeper. As many of you are probably asking, why is 4% the safe number and not 10% or 2%. Very simply, investing money will pay you dividends and increase in value at an average rate of 7% per year. On average inflation is about 3%, basically decreasing the actual value of the money you have. Combine those two numbers, and you’re a 4% – your net income will increase by 4% each year.

And if you spend that 4% without going over, you’ll end the year with the same amount that you’ve started… in perpetuity. Okay okay – i know a lot of you say this is crazy – what about the recession – you can’t predict stocks – and lots more thoughts. But let’s look at those numbers even deeper. Since 1900… over one hundred years ago, the average return per year has been 7% including reinvested dividends (meaning you reinvest the dividends – or the money the companies pay your for investing – into your investment). For inflation – since 1913 – over one hundred years ago, the average yearly inflation is 3.22% Even through the great depression, world wars, crazy years of inflation, more wars, and the great recession the average return rate has been 7% and inflation has been just over 3% What does this tell us? It tells us that investing is more about being patient and investing early rather than trying to time the market.

Now this doesn’t mean that it can’t change. Investing is a risk. That’s why you do it and make money from it. But world war iii could happen. another even greater depression could happen. and we have to be prepared for something like that. because if you retired with 1,000,000 in 2007, assuming you’d be able to spend 4% of your net worth per year, you were in for a surprise – which might mean going back to work for a few years and waiting out the recession.

Hopefully, if you did that… and left your investments in the stock and bond market, you would be in good shape. The key takeaway is that throughout the history of modern america – you’ll be fine to retire using the 4% rule. So calculate your yearly expenses… include some emergency padding… and start investing to get to that goal of 25 times your expenses.

As found on Youtube

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