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The $65,000 Roth IRA Mistake To Avoid

– I've seen too many of
you making some mistakes when it comes to investing
in your Roth IRA. One of them could cost you
$65,000 and the other one could cost you almost $500,000. You guys are seriously going
to make my beard turn more gray than it already is if
you don't knock it off. So let me show you what to watch out for, that way, you don't lose more money than you have to and
I can save a few bucks on hair dye for a couple more years.

A Roth IRA is a self-directed
retirement account where you can contribute after
tax dollars to be invested. Since the money going in is taxed, the growth of your investments are not taxed and the money withdrawal from the account are never taxed either, as long as you don't try to pull out some of the money before the age of 59.5. There is no such thing
as a joint Roth IRA. So if you and your spouse
want to contribute to one, then you'll have to do it individually, hence the name Individual
Retirement Account. If you both have enough
earned income separately, then you can each invest up to the $6500 limit for the year.

If one of you works and the other doesn't, but you file a joint tax return, then the person working can, of course, contribute to a Roth IRA and
your spouse can contribute to a Spousal Roth IRA as well. Remember, these accounts are
owned by the individual person and on paper, not co-owned by both people. I want to try to encourage you to max out your Roth IRA every single year, if possible, because if you
don't do it for that year, then in the future you
cannot go back and contribute for a previous year once that time limit has passed. A Roth IRA is one of those accounts where I would bend over backwards to make sure that I can
put in the full amount allowed every single year. In my order of operations for
what to do with your money, I have maxing out a Roth
IRA right after investing up to your employer match and HSA.

That is how important
this type of account is. The good news with this
is that you actually have a timeframe of 16
months to contribute for each calendar year. So if we are in 2023
right now, then you have from January 1st, 2023, up until
when taxes need to be filed for that year to contribute,
which in this case, would be April 15th, 2024. That's how it is every single year, so ignore the actual dates in my example and pay more attention to the timeframes since the date taxes are due
will change by a few days from year to year.

Most brokerages will ask
you which year you want to contribute to. For example, I personally
invest using M1 Finance, which you can check out down
in the description below, and also get a deposit bonus as well. If I contributed to my Roth
IRA through them right now, then they would ask if I wanted the money to go towards 2022 or 2023, since at the time of recording this, we haven't hit the date
where taxes are due. This is great because it
gives you some extra time beyond the current year to
contribute Roth IRA money for that year. Before I tell you the next mistake that I see way too many people making, please help support my dog Molly by hitting that thumbs up
button and sharing this video with anyone you think it would help.

Once you deposit money into your Roth IRA, there's one more extremely important step you need to do that I see a ton of people missing, and that is
actually investing the money. I can't tell you how
many people I've talked to over the years who just put money into the account assuming
it would automatically grow, or knowing that they
needed to invest the money, but just forgetting to do
it because life happens, and things naturally slip out of our mind, only to check their account
balance years later, realizing that it hasn't grown in value because they didn't invest the money. Stop the nonsense here and
just set up auto investing within your investment account, and if you're waiting because you think that you can time the market
to buy in at a lower price, you can't, because it's
nearly impossible to do, so just to get the money
invested right now.

If you know how you want to
invest the money, then great. If you don't, then I personally
like the two fund portfolio for people who are in
the accumulation phase of investing and in the
three fund portfolio for when you're closer to
retirement or in retirement. I'll have a link to a
playlist then I made just for you where I teach you
about both of those portfolios down in the description below
and above my head as well. When you contribute to a Roth IRA, all of your money is not
locked up until 59.5. You can withdraw the
contributions that you've made before that age without paying a penalty, but you cannot withdraw any of
the gains within the account. For example, if you've contributed $6500 and the account has grown to $10,000, then you can withdraw
the $6500 contribution, but you cannot touch the $3500 gain without paying a penalty until 59.5. I've gotta interject for a second to give my personal opinion on this. While withdrawing money
penalty-free is an option, I want to encourage you not to do this.

To be brutally honest, I think that doing this
is one of the dumbest, most irresponsible, short-sighted
things that you can do. Withdrawing just $6500
worth of contributions would cost you $65,000 in
future investment growth. So when any money is
taken out of this account before retirement, think
about how it's actually going to cost you 7,800 Chipotle burritos, or 65 new Apple iPhones, or anything else that you would buy for that amount of money. And yes, I am fully aware
that you can do a penalty-free early withdrawal up to
$10,000 before the age of 59.5 for a first time home purchase. But this is just as stupid as withdrawing your contributions early
because that $10,000 is costing you over $100,000
in future investment growth when you pull that money out.

Average annual home appreciation over the past 12 years has been 6.11%, and the US stock market
has returned 12.27%. Leave your money in the freaking Roth IRA and go earn that $10,000 that
you need to buy the home. Responsible investing takes time, like five or 10-plus years, and this money needs time to grow. The second you withdraw
any of your contributions, you are cutting down that tree before it even has a chance to grow fruit. Once you withdraw
contributions from the past, you cannot replace that
money in the future. I get that emergencies happen in life, so that's why you need
to have money set aside in an emergency fund to
pay for those things.

Do not, under 99.999% of circumstances, use your Roth IRA money for anything other than when you retire. One thing I see way too many people doing is investing in a
taxable brokerage account before they have their Roth
IRA maxed out for the year. This is a huge mistake from a tax savings
perspective for some of you because of how each account is taxed. With a Roth IRA, you invest with money
that's already been taxed, so the money can grow tax-free
and be withdrawn tax-free. With a taxable brokerage
account, you are paying taxes for the ongoing dividend
distributions every single year. Then you have to pay capital gains tax when you go to withdraw the money.

Since the money within
a Roth IRA will grow and can be withdrawn tax-free, realistically, you want
this account to get as large as possible, but not at the expense of
your personal risk tolerance. You should not take on
additional levels of risk by investing in more
risky, unprofitable stocks that random YouTubers have been pumping over the past few years or actively manage funds to
try to achieve higher returns. 99% of people, including
myself, cannot handle investing in something with a
high risk and potential, potential, high return. So don't even bother. The money in this account
is for retirement, so is it really worth it to risk that 60-year-old's financial wellbeing because you decided to gamble with their money right now? I doubt it.

Some of you might be over
the income limit to be able to contribute to a Roth IRA, or some of you will be at
that point in the future as your income grows. You can still contribute to a Roth IRA to take advantage of the tax-free growth by doing a backdoor Roth. To simply explain the process,
all you do is contribute to a traditional IRA.

Do not invest the money yet. Then contact your brokerage
to have them convert the money to a Roth IRA. Now, I have done it with M1 Finance before and it was extremely easy. It only took I think two or three days for the money to get into my Roth IRA. Only do this if it makes sense based on your current tax rates
and future financial plans. There's two things that you can do. if you are someone who thinks that you might be over the income limit, but you are not going to 100%
know until the year is over. Number one, you can
either wait until January of the following year,
like we talked about in one of the previous mistakes that
I mentioned, or number two, you can just contribute the
money to a traditional IRA, then do a backdoor Roth within
the year to get the money into the account so it can be invested.

That way, if you are
over the income limit, you've already done the backdoor Roth. If you're under the income limit, no big deal 'cause you had to pay taxes on that money that was going
into the Roth IRA anyways. A question I get a lot is
whether or not you can contribute to a Roth IRA on different brokerages. The simple answer is yes. This is how it would play out. You can contribute up to the max for one year
on, say, M1 Finance. Then you can decide to contribute up to the max on fidelity the next year. Then you can contribute up to the max on Vanguard the following year. So by the end of that third year, you would have three different Roth IRAs with three different brokerages, and there is no problem with that. You can take it one step further. If you decide, hey, out of these three, I actually like M1 finance
better than the other two, you can convert the
Roth IRAs with Fidelity and Vanguard into your
M1 Finance Roth IRA.

You can also split up your contribution for the same year among
different brokerages. So if for this year you want
to say contribute $4,000 to an M1 Finance Roth IRA and the remaining $2,500
into a Fidelity Roth IRA, then you can do that without any problems. The only thing you
cannot do is try to game the system by saying contributing $6500 into an M1 Finance Roth IRA and $6500 into a Roth IRA with another brokerage. You cannot exceed the maximum
amount allowed per year across all of your Roth IRAs on all of your brokerage accounts.

Technically, you could do that since all of the brokerages aren't talking
to each other to keep track of what you are contributing, so you have to self-manage this. I would highly, highly recommend making sure
that you do not do this, whether it's on purpose or on accident. I don't know what the penalty is for this, but all I know is that you do
not want to get caught trying to defraud the government
in any way, shape, or form. Long-term investing is the name
of the game with a Roth IRA. This money is for when
you are in retirement, so make sure to take that into account when investing this money. No gambling it on stocks
that random YouTubers are promoting. I think the two or three fund portfolio is perfect for your Roth IRA, which you can learn more about
in these videos to your left. There's a bunch of free stocks and resources down in
the description below to help with all of your personal finance and investing needs.

I'll see you in the next one, friends, go..

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401K to Gold IRA Rollover

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Pay This Off Before You Retire – Retirement Planning Tips

in this video we'll look at what expenses you should think about getting rid of before retiring and a few mistakes that retirees make when it comes to expenses in retirement there's a few things that you may want to say goodbye to before you say goodbye to that wage or that work income we're going to cover this in three parts it's going to look like this first we'll go over needs and wants and then what i'd call highway robbery and then also what to ear mark in retirement we've seen that the retirees that can get rid of these expenses before retiring have a little bit more breathing room and they feel better about their retirement plan because when you're planning for retirement we usually think about really two types of expenses it's the needs which are the essentials the absolute must-haves to just live you know as you think about my maslow's hierarchy of needs those things at the base layer and then there's the wants which are the the nice to have things but then there are other types of expenses that really don't fit into that category of needs or wants those are the things that we need to be done with before retirement and by the way i'm dave zoller and me and my team we run streamline financial it's a wealth management firm focused on retirement planning and we've been helping people personally for 13 years and streamlines been around for 22 years and we created this channel to share what's working with our clients so that you can benefit too so if you're close to retirement be sure to subscribe because i share one new video each week to make your retirement a little bit better i also put some free resources in the description below like my favorite diy retirement planner if you're more of a do-it-yourselfer so let's get into the list and then as you're watching if i leave something out please share it in the comments below i'd love to hear from you and then also i'll try to reply back to depending on how many comments i get so the first two you will probably agree with but you might not be thinking about the other ones and i want to show you ways to prepare and just make sure that your retirement is a little bit smoother by using our retirement planning software the first one which you already know is to pay off high interest debt which i sometimes think of as highway robbery it's when those interest rates are just so high and they're charging people it just seems unfair right that high interest debt i'm referring to is usually credit card debt and sometimes it's student loan debt and you'd be surprised at the number of people who in their first year of retirement they still have a large monthly payment towards credit card payments or student loan debt and this should be the number one thing that we should focus on to really reduce before we say goodbye to that job income or that wage because if you retire with credit card debt and then you get serious about paying it off in retirement then that means you've got this bigger amount that you got to take from investments which could alter your retirement plans i helped a woman recently who's not a client but she was looking at her plan and she wanted some help and she had about 20k of credit card debt she also had over a million dollars and her regular expenses adding on this 20k of a lump sum expense to her plan it really made quite an impact and once we looked at that together it gave her the motivation to work a little bit extra and extra hard to get this debt payment down to zero or get the credit card debt down to zero before retiring because she'd have a greater peace of mind and it would just increase her confidence as she was going into retirement that peace of mind it's key right i'm sure you're feeling the same way i actually want to share a little bit more about how to achieve this before you retire and during retirement and i share that at the end of this video so stay tuned the next ones are expenses that you can either pay early or at least you want to earmark these in your retirement plan and i'll show you what i mean when i say earmark that just means setting aside funds for specific purposes and either not including those funds in your retirement plan or including them but at least showing the specifics within the plan and i'll show you some images coming up of a retirement plan and how to do this number one thing to earmark is any big travel expenses that you're looking forward to that first year of retirement or really the first few years of retirement a lot of people kick off retirement and they'll really have a big special trip that they've always wanted to take or a place that they've always wanted to go to and lots of times that vacation it's going to cost more than the typical vacation that you might take on a regular year it's really that cap to uh ending work and then really doing a bigger than normal trip some clients choose to take one of those european uh river cruises that are pretty popular and they can cost 10 to 20k or more and knowing that this is a bigger than normal expense or a lump sum expense coming soon into retirement you can either pay that ahead of time like actually many of the cruise places make you do or you can at least earmark it in the plan and make sure that it all works with everything and i'll throw it in there as an example coming up soon here's an example of a retirement plan that's based on annual expenses going up each year three percent regular inflation rate and then over on the left side we can add some expenses that are bigger and irregular you know not the regular every year expenses but things we can earmark so that we can see the impact of on the plan before actually spending the money and doing it this way we can add some peace of mind to your retirement plan and your confidence as you're spending money and so you can just feel that it's a good decision and feel good about that vacation or whatever it might be a few other bigger than normal one-time expenses we've seen are related to your adult kids if you have them whether it's final college expenses or maybe a wedding that you want to help out with or future gifts maybe towards a home purchase or something like that for those you're not really able to pay those before you retire because we don't know when they're going to happen so earmarking them is the next best step and setting funds aside to make sure that these potential expenses that you might have in the future are ready and available ready to deploy when needed one mistake that we've seen some retirees make getting close to retirement is not factoring in these one-time expenses and then getting caught a little off guard when it's time to pay for them especially if we're in a market like we are now now you might be thinking one big expense that i did not mention and before i share that one if you enjoyed watching this video so far and you found it helpful please click the like button so this can hopefully spread to other people who are like you and might find it helpful as well so that one big expense that you might be thinking of that i didn't mention yet is paying off your whole mortgage before you retire and this is a big one for many people as you've heard before behind every financial decision there's also an emotional one as well and many people they feel very strongly or maybe adamant on on being debt-free in retirement and that's a really good feeling for for many people for others depending on their financial decision it actually a mortgage could actually make sense in retirement some people see it as a fixed expense which doesn't go up with inflation it actually gets cheaper as everything else increases with inflation and as one dollar can buy less and less over time which is basically what what inflation is it may be at really attractive interest rates as well and some people want to have a little bit more flexibility in their retirement accounts by keeping some funds available in their non-retirement accounts versus using that money to pay off the mortgage the more important thing to to think about when deciding whether this makes sense whether to pay it off or not is try to measure first just the emotional feeling or comfort with debt you know yourself and then also your spouse if you're married and then step two is map out both scenarios what does it look like that plan that we're just looking at over here what does it look like if you pay off debt early or don't pay off the mortgage at all look at the difference see which one's okay lots of times it comes down to the strength of the emotional feeling around debt for one person in the relationship or if it's just you then it's just whatever you prefer when we're thinking about paying off expenses or earmarking things in retirement get help from a financial professional a cfp could be a great place to start but i'd like to hear from you what did i not mention as we're thinking about these different expenses in retirement i'd love to hear your thoughts about these expenses and especially the thoughts on mortgage having a mortgage in retirement and i want to share another video about how increasing peace of mind and making sure that you get both parts needed for a successful retirement the sad thing is that in this industry the financial industry most of the time they focus on one thing but here's a video to watch that'll help you think about and prepare for both sides of retirement so hopefully i'll see you there and if you haven't already subscribe and then i'll see you in future videos take care you

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Why Some Retirees Succeed and Others Live in Worry – 5 Retirement Truths

I want to share one of the most valuable pieces of retirement advice that I've ever heard if you're thinking about your retirement and you're wondering if you're doing the right thing or think that you should be doing something different or if you're just worried about all the things going on right now whether it's the economy or the markets or the value of your accounts be sure to watch this video because I'm going to share the retirement truths that every retiree goes through and it's these things right here we're going to cover today and every retiree goes through it and it they experience this in retirement so it's going to go over this and then also what to expect in retirement and then how to give yourself the best chances of maintaining your lifestyle in retirement as well now the negative of these retirement truths that we're going to look at is that many of them lead to increased uncertainty or worry about your retirement one of our goals though as we're thinking about it is really the opposite of uncertainty or worry in retirement it really should be more about confidence right the next years really all the way up until you pass away wait these are the the magic ears these could be the best years of your life and I know that because there's an actual study a research study uh proving this so let me pull that up really quick and show you the results and I'll link to it below people were asked to score their life satisfaction from zero to ten where 10 is the best possible life and then zero is the worst possible life and this is really just the average score by age and I thought it was encouraging to see that life satisfaction tends to increase as you can see as we get older and then it tends to Trail off as we get older but really the area the the period of time we want to focus on is that this is the magic time and we know this to be true as well because we've helped hundreds of pre-retirees move into retirement with confidence and excitement and these were the people who were coming to us that were feeling somewhat unsure or not 100 confident with their money plan and our firm streamline Financial has been around for 24 years and we've made it through quite a few bad Market periods with our clients and by the way if I haven't met you yet I'm Dave zoller and I own streamline Financial with Tim and Luke and Sean and if you're working with an advisor now that's mainly focused on investments and investment planning but doesn't talk about these key retirement strategies like the tax efficient withdrawal planning and income planning or just tax reduction overall feel free to reach out to us through the website now we don't always have time but I'll get back to you either way so let's get into this first truth in retirement it will be common to have that thought of maybe I should be be making a change or should I be doing something different it'll be normal to feel this way in retirement especially when you see the news or you're listening to friends talk about their finances there's this feeling or this thought of really making us doubt our current plan which causes some people to make more emotional decisions instead of making smart financial decisions and a good way to avoid this is really to avoid this feeling is by having an understanding of your plan which really leads to more confidence with what you're doing and having a plan for both the good times and also the bad Mark of times so that you know that you're prepared for either one of those and I'll give you some ways to achieve this coming up in this video now on to the second thing that comes up in retirement that we just have to be prepared for is we need to expect bear markets right you've most likely lived through a lot of them already and really in retirement though they feel a little bit different usually worse but because of the frequency creating a plan with bear markets in mind and really big Corrections built into the plan is a smart thing to do that way you don't have to worry when they eventually come now if you're not sure how to model out these various what-if scenarios or bad Market scenarios for your plan then you may want to talk to a cfp or check out my favorite retirement income planner below this video you should see a link to it it's one of the best consumer facing planners that I've seen and it doesn't cost thousands of dollars like the ones that we use for our clients the next thing to bring up is for pre-retirees who are close to stopping their wage especially if that's during bad markets they may think should I work a little bit longer maybe just one more year to kind of make it through this this difficult period we actually had a client call us up about five months ago and uh no she was five months into retirement and she said something like it seems like so much bad news is out there and what's going on with the markets I'm wondering if I it would have been better if I should have just kept working so we reviewed her plan and because we built in to her plan this expectation of bad markets everything looked great and and really the only reason to keep working would be if she really enjoyed this sort of work that she was doing and it brought her some some purpose but she didn't so it was great it was great confirmation that she was still on the right track so if this sounds like you take a look at another video I recorded I'm gonna either link on this screen or it'll be below and it gives a few real examples of what working an extra year might look like in a financial plan the next thing to know is that no one really knows what's going to happen next it seems like everybody has a prediction on TV or YouTube or at the dinner table with family or with friends and no one really knows what is definitely going to happen we know this uh in a logical way because you know there's that saying if you put 10 economists in the room together and they come up they need to come up with a conclusion they'll come up with 12 of different answers when they walk out knowing that it's important to prepare your investment plan for that four economic Seasons that we may go through in the future since we don't know which one we're going to go through next so just as as an example you've seen it before the four economic seasons are higher than expected economic growth or lower than expected economic growth and then higher than expected inflation or lower than expected inflation and there's asset classes that can do well in each one of those now again we don't know which way we're headed but having asset classes and each one of those potential Seasons that could be beneficial now that's just my opinion and really it's for all of this talk to your own Financial professionals before doing anything like this now on to the next one which really has more to do with human psychology than investment strategy and then after that I'll share the the really the most helpful piece of advice that I've heard related to retirement planning but if you'd like this so far please click on the the like button and and maybe this video can help somebody else going through the same things that that you're looking forward to so the next truth is in retirement we may have a tendency to compare ourselves to others the grass is always greener on the other side of the fence really throughout life that's we've got that tendency to compare it to others but it can harm us in retirement too if we do a video on this channel that mentions a dollar amount as an example we don't want that to really make you feel better or feel worse about your current situation because you know we help high net worth families at streamline Financial we sometimes mention big numbers but we don't want it to be about the numbers we really want to communicate just the principles and the strategies that can can really be applied to to anybody's finances and there's always going to be people with more than us and then there's always going to be people with less than us and the one who wins is the one who's content and at peace most at peace with their current situation you know that saying if I want to be able to practice being content with a little and I want to be able to practice being content with a lot and and you know healthy competition that's okay but comparing ourselves to someone else because uh you know if it causes us a feel of lack or less than that can hurt our retirement plans because that leads really back to that first point that we talked about in uh in this list of feeling like we should be doing something different for example if we see a guy on the internet and he's investing a certain way or he's deciding he's changing up his entire strategy um because of what's happening with the economy then that may cause us to feel like we should be doing something different and then start to increase the emotional level of uh of our decision making instead of staying to strictly logical or financial levels but again it's a normal feeling to feel that worry or fear or anxiety um with what's happening during during current periods but one of the most helpful pieces of advice that I've heard that we can apply to retirement planning is really the difference between those two words fear and anxiety knowing the difference between those two is actually very very helpful as we're planning retirement and talking about money that is if we want to feel better about what we're doing right now when we think about fear and anxiety we might think of them as being the same thing but actually they're completely different things and let me just pull up these two definitions if I can really quickly fear is a caution over a real and present danger and then anxiety is a worry over an imagined future danger now fear if we've got something right in front of us then it's obviously a very helpful tool for us as humans anxiety though is not always a helpful tool as as we're trying to process things partly because these anxieties there's nothing we can do to control or influence them you may have seen this drawing from Carl Richards before about things that matter and then things I can control here's a place to focus and then another way to look at it is we actually sent this to clients not too long ago on a video of what you can't control and what you can control so we can't control the markets and inflation and what they're doing with interest rates or what's happening in the news or the world or tax laws or the elections but a lot of these things actually do relate to things that we can control for instance you know markets are inflation or interest rates your portfolio allocation you can control that you can control when to pay taxes when it's related to in investing you know as we're talking about Roth conversions or the the costs the tax cost tax drag on some of the portfolio and not to get too nerdy about these things but two of the biggest things that we've seen is this idea of not controlling the news but what we can control is news consumption we've seen a big shift with uh some people who instead of someone who wants to consume the news they switch from TV news to reading news where you have a little bit more control of what's coming at you versus TV is just the next thing is coming at you if you know what I mean I don't know if that's if I if I'm explaining that the right way but back to the this video all the things that we mentioned before earlier here um a lot of these can be anxiety-inducing things as well right the severity of a bear Market or not being able to predict what's going to happen next in the world or comparing ourselves and doubting our plan or thinking that we don't have as much as as we wish we had when it comes to to money or the you know what if this happens and what if this happens how is that going to impact my plan and that can lead that sort of thinking can lead to paralysis and really no action being taken but what if you had a plan that was built in to show those different what-if scenarios so instead of the unknown future danger you're able to get more concrete scenarios in the plan as a result that's what I would recommend once you get get it out in the open then it becomes a lot less scary we both know that so either find a great certified financial planner who can show you that and show you the what-if scenarios or check out the the DIY planner or a different planner that helps you put in those what-if scenarios as well so it becomes less scary so don't forget anxiety is it can be the thief of Dreams it takes you away from enjoying the the present moment and it stops you from even taking the right action to make things better in the future because it really just makes you only focused on on the negative as you're you're moving through life that video that I mentioned earlier is called why delaying retirement might not be a good idea if you're pre-retirement and you're thinking you want to work a little bit longer because of what's going on take a look at that one coming up next or below and then I'll see you in the next video take care foreign [Music]

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Why This Investment System Can Help Retirees Worry Less About Their Retirement Plan

I want to share an investment system for retirees to hopefully assist you as you're thinking about and planning for your retirement we're also going to look at how to prepare your retirement for the multiple potential potential economic Seasons that we may be headed into so we want to look at the multiple seasons and then the Easy System that's going to help lower taxes and then lower risk as well now if I haven't met you yet I'm Dave zoller and we help people plan for and Implement these retirement strategies really for a select number of people at streamline Financial that's our retirement planning firm but because we can't help everyone we want to share this with you as well so if you like retirement specific videos about one per week be sure to subscribe so in order to create a proper investment plan in system we want to make sure that we build out the retirement income plan first because without the income plan it's much harder to design the right investment strategy it's kind of like without the income plan it's like you're guessing at well 60 40 portfolio sounds good or you know May maybe this amount in the conservative bucket sounds reasonable you already know and and you feel that as you get close to retirement that goal of just more money isn't the the end-all goal that we should really be aiming for for retirement it's more about sustainability and certainty and then really the certainty of income and possibly less risk than before the last 30 years uh the things that you did to be successful with the financial side are going to look different than the next 20 or 30 years now if you need help defining the the income plan a little bit then look at the DIY retirement course below this video now once you do Define your goals for retirement and then the income needed to achieve those goals then creating the investment system becomes a lot easier and within the investment plan we really know that we can only control three things in all three things we actually want to minimize through this investment system the first thing we can minimize or reduce is how much tax you pay when investing we had a a client who was not a client of streamline Financial but of a tax firm coming to the the CPA firm in March to pick up his tax return and he was completely surprised that he had sixty thousand dollars of extra income on his tax return that he had to pay tax on right away before April 15th and it was due to the capital gains being recognized and other distributions within his investment account and he said but I didn't sell anything and the account didn't even go up that much last year and I got to pay tax on it but he was already in the highest tax bracket paying about close to 37 percent on short-term capital gains and dividends and interest so that was an unpleasant surprise and we see it happen more often than it should but this can really be avoided and here's two ways we can control tax so that we don't have to have that happen and really just control tax and pay less of it is the goal and I'll keep this at a high level but it'll get the the point across number one is the kinds of Investments that you own some are maybe funds or ETFs or individual uh equities or things like that the funds and ETFs they could pass on capital gains and and distributions to you each year without you even doing anything without you selling or or buying but it happens within the fund a lot of times now we would use funds and ETFs that are considered tax efficient so that our clients they can decide when to recognize gains rather than letting the fund company decide now the second way is by using a strategy that's called tlh each year there's many many fluctuations or big fluctuations that happen in an investment account and the strategy that we call tlh that allows our clients that's tax loss harvesting it allows them to sell an investment that may be down for part of the year and then move it into a very similar investment right away so that the investment strategy stays the same and they can actually take a write-off on that loss on their taxes that year now there's some rules around this again we're going high level but it offsets uh you know for that one client who are not a client but who had the big sixty thousand dollars of income he could have been offsetting those capital gains by doing tlh or tax loss harvesting that strategy has really saved hundreds and thousands of of dollars for clients over a period of years so on to the next thing that we can control in our investment plan and that's cost this one's easier but many advisors they don't do it because it ends up paying them less now since we're certified financial planner professionals we do follow the fiduciary standard and we're obligated to do what's best for our clients so tell me this if you had two Investments and they had the exact same strategy the same Returns the same risk and the same tax efficiency would you rather want the one that costs 0.05 percent per year or the one that costs 12 times more at point six percent well I know that answer is obvious and we'd go with a lower cost funds if it was all the same low-cost funds and ETFs that's how we can really help reduce the cost or that's how you can help reduce the cost in your investment plan because every basis point or part of a percentage that's saved in cost it's added to your return each year and this adds up to a lot over time now the last thing that we want to minimize and control is risk and we already talked about the flaws of investing solely based on on risk tolerance and when it comes to risk a lot of people think that term risk tolerance you know how much risk can we on a scale of one to ten where are we on the the risk factor but there's another way to look at risk in your investment strategy and like King Solomon we believe that there's a season for everything or like the if it was the bird song There's a season for everything and we also believe that there's four different seasons in investing and depending on what season we're in some Investments perform better than others and the Four Seasons are pull it up right now it's higher than expected inflation which we might be feeling but there's also a season that can be lower than expected or deflation and then there's higher than expected economic growth or lower than expected economic growth and the goal is reduce the risk in investing by making sure that we're prepared for each and every one of those potential Seasons because there are individual asset classes that tend to do well during each one of those seasons and we don't know nobody knows what's really going to happen you know people would would speculate and say oh it's going to be this or this or whatever might happen but we don't know for sure that's why we want to make sure we just have the asset classes in the right spots so that the income plan doesn't get impacted so the investment system combined with the income system clients don't have to worry about the movements in the market because they know they've got enough to weather any potential season I hope this has been helpful for you so far as you're thinking about your retirement if it was please subscribe or like this video so that hopefully other people can be helped as well and then I'll see you in the next one take care thank you

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Why This Investment System Can Help Retirees Worry Less About Their Retirement Plan

I want to share an investment system for retirees to hopefully assist you as you're thinking about and planning for your retirement we're also going to look at how to prepare your retirement for the multiple potential potential economic Seasons that we may be headed into so we want to look at the multiple seasons and then the Easy System that's going to help lower taxes and then lower risk as well now if I haven't met you yet I'm Dave zoller and we help people plan for and Implement these retirement strategies really for a select number of people at streamline Financial that's our retirement planning firm but because we can't help everyone we want to share this with you as well so if you like retirement specific videos about one per week be sure to subscribe so in order to create a proper investment plan in system we want to make sure that we build out the retirement income plan first because without the income plan it's much harder to design the right investment strategy it's kind of like without the income plan it's like you're guessing at well 60 40 portfolio sounds good or you know May maybe this amount in the conservative bucket sounds reasonable you already know and and you feel that as you get close to retirement that goal of just more money isn't the the end-all goal that we should really be aiming for for retirement it's more about sustainability and certainty and then really the certainty of income and possibly less risk than before the last 30 years uh the things that you did to be successful with the financial side are going to look different than the next 20 or 30 years now if you need help defining the the income plan a little bit then look at the DIY retirement course below this video now once you do Define your goals for retirement and then the income needed to achieve those goals then creating the investment system becomes a lot easier and within the investment plan we really know that we can only control three things in all three things we actually want to minimize through this investment system the first thing we can minimize or reduce is how much tax you pay when investing we had a a client who was not a client of streamline Financial but of a tax firm coming to the the CPA firm in March to pick up his tax return and he was completely surprised that he had sixty thousand dollars of extra income on his tax return that he had to pay tax on right away before April 15th and it was due to the capital gains being recognized and other distributions within his investment account and he said but I didn't sell anything and the account didn't even go up that much last year and I got to pay tax on it but he was already in the highest tax bracket paying about close to 37 percent on short-term capital gains and dividends and interest so that was an unpleasant surprise and we see it happen more often than it should but this can really be avoided and here's two ways we can control tax so that we don't have to have that happen and really just control tax and pay less of it is the goal and I'll keep this at a high level but it'll get the the point across number one is the kinds of Investments that you own some are maybe funds or ETFs or individual uh equities or things like that the funds and ETFs they could pass on capital gains and and distributions to you each year without you even doing anything without you selling or or buying but it happens within the fund a lot of times now we would use funds and ETFs that are considered tax efficient so that our clients they can decide when to recognize gains rather than letting the fund company decide now the second way is by using a strategy that's called tlh each year there's many many fluctuations or big fluctuations that happen in an investment account and the strategy that we call tlh that allows our clients that's tax loss harvesting it allows them to sell an investment that may be down for part of the year and then move it into a very similar investment right away so that the investment strategy stays the same and they can actually take a write-off on that loss on their taxes that year now there's some rules around this again we're going high level but it offsets uh you know for that one client who are not a client but who had the big sixty thousand dollars of income he could have been offsetting those capital gains by doing tlh or tax loss harvesting that strategy has really saved hundreds and thousands of of dollars for clients over a period of years so on to the next thing that we can control in our investment plan and that's cost this one's easier but many advisors they don't do it because it ends up paying them less now since we're certified financial planner professionals we do follow the fiduciary standard and we're obligated to do what's best for our clients so tell me this if you had two Investments and they had the exact same strategy the same Returns the same risk and the same tax efficiency would you rather want the one that costs 0.05 percent per year or the one that costs 12 times more at point six percent well I know that answer is obvious and we'd go with a lower cost funds if it was all the same low-cost funds and ETFs that's how we can really help reduce the cost or that's how you can help reduce the cost in your investment plan because every basis point or part of a percentage that's saved in cost it's added to your return each year and this adds up to a lot over time now the last thing that we want to minimize and control is risk and we already talked about the flaws of investing solely based on on risk tolerance and when it comes to risk a lot of people think that term risk tolerance you know how much risk can we on a scale of one to ten where are we on the the risk factor but there's another way to look at risk in your investment strategy and like King Solomon we believe that there's a season for everything or like the if it was the bird song There's a season for everything and we also believe that there's four different seasons in investing and depending on what season we're in some Investments perform better than others and the Four Seasons are pull it up right now it's higher than expected inflation which we might be feeling but there's also a season that can be lower than expected or deflation and then there's higher than expected economic growth or lower than expected economic growth and the goal is reduce the risk in investing by making sure that we're prepared for each and every one of those potential Seasons because there are individual asset classes that tend to do well during each one of those seasons and we don't know nobody knows what's really going to happen you know people would would speculate and say oh it's going to be this or this or whatever might happen but we don't know for sure that's why we want to make sure we just have the asset classes in the right spots so that the income plan doesn't get impacted so the investment system combined with the income system clients don't have to worry about the movements in the market because they know they've got enough to weather any potential season I hope this has been helpful for you so far as you're thinking about your retirement if it was please subscribe or like this video so that hopefully other people can be helped as well and then I'll see you in the next one take care thank you

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Step 1 of Retirement Success Plan: Investment and Portfolio Analysis

I'm giving you a choice of two Investments investment a and investment B both of them return 10 over the previous year which one would you rather have been invested [Music] oftentimes when I ask this question to a prospective client I'll get the response Troy it doesn't matter they both return 10 Give Me A or B but when it comes to retirement planning and this is why step one of the rrsp is so important the allocation meeting it's not about the return necessarily it's about how much risk did we have to take to get that return investment A and B both had a 10 percent return but this is just one outcome in an infinite set of possible outcomes remember these are two distinct Investments with different characteristics possibly different purposes so even though they return the same the question is how much risk did we take to earn this return are we being compensated enough from a reward standpoint based on the risk that we're taking so with a high degree of statistical confidence we could analyze and say investment a had a likely downside scenario of somewhere between five to fifteen percent if a different set of outcomes or circumstances occurred that's the risk profile but invest B had a possible downside of negative 20 to negative 40 percent now with that new bit of information which investment would you choose investment a or investment B all individual Investments or combination of Investments could be plotted somewhere along this chart this is what we call the efficient Frontier over here we have the return the expected return and over here we have the risk that we're taking so ideally we have Investments that are more to the left which represents lower risk and higher up the y-axis which represents higher return so if you own five different stocks that portfolio in and of itself could be plotted somewhere on this graph if you have one security let's say you're fully invested in your company stock you could plot it right here on this graph now if you have 20 or 30 or 50 different mutual funds or ETFs or individual stocks once again that set of Investments can be plotted somewhere on this graph so when we plot investment a and investment B on the graph here we can clearly see that they have a similar return profile but investment a has less risk so this makes it easier to identify as an investment that we would rather place our dollars now down here I have investment C could be a portfolio of stocks this could be maybe if you have a lot of money invested in your company stock but we clearly see that we're taking more risk without being rewarded for that risk that we're taking another way to think about this is think of your skills and the capability that you have in your current job or in your former job if you're if you're retired would you take a salary that was much much lower than Market in order to do that same job with those same responsibilities no you probably would not I know you would not that's what we're doing here with investment C essentially we are taking risk or taking on responsibilities in that example while not being compensated for it okay so think of these letters investment a investment being investment C this was the one we wanted to be in this is the one that we took a little bit more risk for the same return and over here we just don't want to be in I want to liken this to GPA grade point average because we're all pretty familiar with that either you from your schooling experience you have kids or grandkids an a investment or set of Investments kind of I put a in air quotes here that's the GPA so what we want to do with your portfolio in retirement is increase its GPA we want to reduce risk and increase expected return now that you have a good understanding of risk and return and how every set of Investments can be placed somewhere on that graph it's now important to tie that into retirement planning so the allocation determines how much income you can take how much money will be left later in life it determines how much tax you'll pay in retirement it can also impact your health care strategy or long-term care strategy and it definitely impacts your overall estate plan so those are the five steps of the RSP and this is why the allocation is so critical it's step one because it impacts everything else when you reach out to us for the first time all we do on that first visit is get to understand who you are and what's important to you we're going to gather some of the objective data under of course understand what your vision is for retirement your goals but the objective data is the current portfolio the financial statements the tax information how much we want to spend in retirement in between that first and the second visit we're going to go through an analysis to see where your portfolio falls on that Spectrum in order to understand if there's congruence between your willingness to take risk for the expected return that your portfolio can provide and where you currently are we first have to identify what is that willingness that you have to take on risk so we have to first understand your willingness to take risk so this is a pretty simple questionnaire here simply saying over the next six months you're comfortable risking this in order to make this potential return now this is what we call a symmetrical risk return profile we're essentially risking one dollar to earn one dollar but really what we're trying to identify here is what is your comfort zone on the downside because what we're going to try to do is create a portfolio that has an asymmetrical risk return profile so less risk to achieve more potential return so are you comfortable losing seven percent over the next six months in a recession or are you fine to let it stay invested and you believe long-term capital markets are going to do just fine so you're more comfortable in the short term possibly a 13 loss there's no right or wrong answer here but everyone's personal willingness to take risk is different so we have to identify that because if you have a portfolio that has too much risk that is the one thing that will absolutely be certain to blow up a long-term retirement plan if the market goes down you call us up panicking and say Troy I need to get out of the market I can't take it anymore well you most likely won't be in there for the rebound and all the planning that we've done up to that point can be significantly impacted because we were expecting the risk profile based on the conversations that we had to be structured properly and if it's not and the markets go down then we get out well all of a sudden everything is completely messed up so this is why your risk willingness is such an important concept because if we're putting a plan together we need to know that you're going to stick with it because markets will go down one other thing to point out here I like to focus on the dollar amount because percentages can be deceiving I had a client a long time ago or a prospective client come in and say Troy I'm comfortable losing about 10 percent he had two million dollars so I said okay if the market goes down and you lose 200 000 you're okay with that he said no I fire you instantly so there was a disconnect between the 10 percent and the two hundred thousand dollars so I like to talk about risk in terms of dollars because percentages seem just they don't really drill down into our willingness to take risk whereas if we focus on the dollar amount that hits home okay so this would be coming back on a second visit and we're looking at your actual portfolio and this is very similar to what we see someone maybe told us that they're they're comfortable let's say with about 50 stock but when we do the analysis what we often find is that there's more risk inside the portfolio but on top of there being more risk oftentimes it's not the most efficiently structured so we see down here we actually have bringing the GPA back a 3.1 so this means that it's not the most efficient from a risk-adjusted return standpoint means we're we're not where we want to be on that graph an annual range 3.42 so for taking this much risk we don't want to be rewarded with an annual range midpoint here of only 3.42 percent over the next six months now we also see with the potential risk and reward over the next six months there's a 95 percent probability that this portfolio to the downside could lose 16 percent over a six-month period and the upside is plus 19 so these are very very wide guard rails okay if we extrapolate that out over the course of one year we have a negative 32 percent and a plus 38 so most of our clients aren't comfortable losing potentially 38 percent in a single year so for this level of risk based on the questionnaire that we asked earlier and they come in around a 50 risk score this is not only too much risk inside the portfolio but it's really poorly constructed from an analytical standpoint and the guardrails are far too wide we're not being compensated for the risk that we're taking and that's what this GPA right here is telling us that's the analysis that we go through between the first and the second visit and that's often what we see it's not efficiently structured the portfolio possibly too much risk and oftentimes that GPA is a lower number meaning we're not being compensated with enough expected return for the risk that we're taking so in between that first and the second visit that's what our team is doing looking at your particular situation now once you become a client and we go through that allocation visit this is step one of the RSP what we're trying to do is to create a proposed portfolio that brings first and foremost the risk number in line with that questionnaire that we asked you before we're also trying to create some asymmetry in regards to the risk that we're taking in the expected Return of the set of Investments that we've put together so now what we've done is we've lowered the overall risk score of the portfolio to be more in line with the questions that we were asking in regards to that that slider that we had on the screen if you're not comfortable with potentially losing 19 percent in a six-month period we need to bring the risk score down in the portfolio so that's the first thing that we're trying to do the second thing is we're trying to create asymmetry here so you see this we're risking nine for the potential of 15.

This is over a six month period so we extrapolate that out over 12 months it's minus 18 for plus 30. that's asymmetry when it comes to the risk return profile additionally we've increased the GPA of the portfolio so the maximum according to the software is a 4.3 so this means we're being properly compensated for the risk that we're taking the expected return is the proper compensation for that risk now anything can happen Marcus can go up or down but what we've done is we've created an efficient portfolio that when markets are up or when markets are down our potential returns are in line with our willingness to take risks but also when we've tied this into your income plan tax plan and the rest of the RSP it's all creating a much more congruent financial planning experience also the expense ratio over here I don't know if you noticed before but we had an expense ratio in the mutual funds and that current portfolio in the proposed portfolio we've eliminated those fees so in summary here during the first visit we get to know where your willingness to take risk is in between the first and the second visit we're going through and doing an analysis of your current portfolio identifying the risk score see if there's any disconnect between your willingness to take risk in the actual risk inside your portfolio but then also looking at the potential return what is the GPA what is the expected return what is the Symmetry between these two once you become a client and we go through the allocation meeting here's where we look at the proposed portfolio where we get the risk number of the portfolio in a line with an alignment with your willingness to take risks try to increase the asymmetry between the risk and the potential return increase the GPA of the portfolio and increase the expected return now all of this is a shortened version of what the actual allocation visit looks like but it hopefully conveys how important this step is because it not only determines the amount of risk or the potential downside you could see to your values in retirement it also of course contributes to the potential return which then dominoes into your income for retirement the taxes the health care plan and also the estate strategy so step one allocation extremely critical when it comes to the retirement success plan this is why we do it first [Music] thank you

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Is Retirement Even POSSIBLE?

We want to thank Google's Science Journal App for supporting PBS Digital Studios. Imagine you had a time machine and with the
press of a button you could transport yourself to your own 75th birthday. Assuming you’re still around, what do you
hope to find yourself doing? Writing your memoirs? Sailing around the world? Partying in San Junipero? Very few of us would answer “cleaning toilets
at a fast-food joint,” or “begging for change on the street.” No one wants their story to end that way,
yet shockingly few of us are taking the basic steps to avoid it. The
simple fact is that if we’re lucky to live long enough, one day we will lose our desire
(or physical ability) to keep earning a paycheck. The older we get, the harder it becomes to
maintain a rigid work schedule. And as modern medicine allows us to live longer
and longer, the time we expect to spend in retirement might easily pass 30 years. Think of that for a second. 30 years without income. Nervous yet? Good. So how much would you need to not spend those
years in abject poverty.

Well, that depends on your personal needs,
standard of living, health issues, etc., but as a starting point, the AARP recommends that
to replace a $40,000 per year income for 30 years, you’ll need to start your retirement
with–take a deep breath–$1.18 million. If that number makes you feel a little dizzy…
well, you’re not alone. In one survey, Americans between 55 and 64
reported a median retirement savings of $120,000–only 10% of the amount advised by the AARP! Another survey found that 75% of Americans
over 40 are behind saving for retirement and 28% over 55 have no retirement savings at
all! There are many factors that contributed to
this problem. For one thing, wage growth declined in the
70s and 80s. It picked back up in the 90s, but then the
housing boom convinced a lot of Americans to go into debt to buy overpriced homes, and,
well, we know how that turned out. We’ve also seen an increase in cultural
pressure to show “visual displays of wealth.” A study published in the Quarterly Journal
of Economics suggests that Americans are uniquely concerned about seeming poor to others, so
they spend a disproportionate amount on things like shoes, clothes and cars.

It’s been great business for designer labels
and advertisers–not so much for our savings accounts. Lastly, changes in government policies have
made it easier to not save money. In the past, employees were automatically
enrolled in “defined benefit plans” with pre-set funding amounts to match their retirement
needs. Today’s workers have to “opt in” to
retirement plans like 401(k)s, and figure out for themselves how much to set aside. Furthermore, these plans are often “leaky,”
meaning you’re allowed to remove funds prematurely, which makes it easy to steal from your own
retirement. Does all this mean that saving for retirement
is hopeless and you should just blow your extra dough leasing a sports car? No! It’s still very possible to save up large
amounts of money on a modest income. The three special ingredients are Good Markets,
Compound Interest, and Time. To show you how these elements work together,
it’s time to… RUN THE NUMBERS! Betty is 30 years old and makes $50,000/yr.

She hasn’t saved a dime for retirement yet,
but this year she’s decided to start. Between the amount she is going to save into
her Roth IRA, her 401(k) at work, and her 401(k) match, she’s putting away $625 a
month, or $7,500 a year, That’s 15% of her income–which many experts recommend as a
good savings target. At this rate, by the time she’s 65, Betty
will have personally deposited $262,500 into her retirement account. Impressive, but still a long way from the
million dollars plus she’ll need to retire. But now we add our special ingredients! Over the last 90 years, the stock market has
grown an average of 9.8% per year. But let’s assume a little less than that…
say, 7.5% If Betty can put together a decent portfolio, she can expect her savings to grow
by an average of 7.5% per year. And as long as Betty doesn’t touch that
account, the dividends and interest she earns will generate even more dividends and interest! And over time, her savings doesn’t just
increase in a straight line… it increases exponentially! Now, by the time she’s 65, that $262,500
of her original money has ballooned to $1,277,158.92.

Nice job Betty! A couple things to keep in mind with this
scenario. It’s very likely that goods and services
will cost more in the future due to inflation. However, it’s also very likely that a 30
year old like Betty will see her salary increase as she gains more experience and skill. If she sticks to that same 15% of her salary,
she can expect to have even more set aside for retirement. What if you’re older than Betty and getting
a late start? Well, that may mean that you need to set aside
more of your paycheck, say 20 or 25 percent.

Or you may have to wait until your 70s to
retire. Either of these options is better than doing
nothing or counting on winning the lottery. There are many other factors that can change
your specific situation. Inheritances, social security, pensions, medical
conditions. If you’re not sure where to begin, you can
seek out the help of a financial planner who is a sworn fiduciary. They can outline a plan that fits your needs
and show you that preparing for retirement is not as intimidating as you may think. You don’t have to be into shuffleboard or
bird-watching to expect a little time off in your golden years. And some people want to work as long as they
can. But everyone wants the power to decide that
for themselves, especially after a lifetime of hard work. Of course, if you do manage to get access
to a time machine, you can always fall back on the old “Sports Almanac Retirement Plan.” And that’s our two cents! Thanks to Google for supporting PBS Digital Studios.

Their mobile app, Science Journal lets you take notes and measure scientific phenomena such as light, sound, and motion, using your phone, tablet or Chromebook. You can find activity ideas and additional information on their website at g.co/sciencejournal.

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Retirement Planning During Bear Markets – Especially if It’s Your First One In Retirement

bear markets can feel a lot different when you're retired and you're no longer earning income from work especially if this is your first bear Market since you stopped working when you were younger you know you had time on your side you know you may have even seen drops in the market as an opportunity because it gave you additional time and you got to purchase more shares well things were on sale so to speak but now most likely that's not the case the relationship between our money and our accounts now are of money going out versus money going in to put it simply and plus you may have noticed that there's this psychological component now around money and not wanting to mess things up because the decisions we make really carried much more weight now when we're close to or in retirement and it's really that's not only psychological or emotional it's true because planning the distributions is much more complex than the the planning around around saving and putting money into the investment accounts what led to our investment success the last 30 years is a lot different than what's going to lead to success the next 20 or 30 years or at last that's at least what we've been seeing at streamline Financial since 1998 since we've been around so I want to share how to endure through bad markets if you're close to retirement or you're already retired and then what you can do to actually take advantage of of this even if you're already retired and you're no longer saving money and we're going to do that because we know a universal law of physics that can't be disproven and we can actually apply it to our retirement and make it a little bit better if you're thinking Dave what the heck are you talking about here's a brief explanation so Newton's third law of motion is that every action there's an equal and opposite reaction right you've heard that before so the way that I see it is there's a positive to every negative and the same thing there's a negative to every positive it's the law of polarity so I want to share what the positive is to take advantage of during bad markets and by the way if I haven't met you yet I'm Dave zoller and Tim and Luke and I and Sean we run streamline Financial it's a retirement planning firm and we've been around like I had said since 98 so we've seen clients really go through it all the.com bust the financial crisis and then covet and then all the things in between all those uh you know those mini panics that we've had so we created this channel to share what's working and what has worked for them and so that you can hopefully glean some wisdom from them and then apply it to your your own life so the first thing we need to be aware of is that the previous 30 years there were four bear Market Corrections so that's a drop of 20 or more and then the 30 years before that there was a total of five bear Market Corrections so the main takeaway is we need to expect these bear markets to happen during our retirement during that next 20 30 years right the second thing is we don't want to make a change solely on an emotion right and it's not not just making a drastic change like selling everything and putting everything under the mattress right it's we were just talking to someone yesterday and emotions can cause us not to take an action when we know doing so is actually the Smart Financial thing to do for instance during March of 2020 when it wasn't easy to rebalance your accounts it was very difficult to do but if you did follow through and and do the correct rebalancing system or strategy if you were looking back now it could have made a lot of sense the third thing is update your income plan because that helps guide us and make really good planning decisions around our investment plan so it's really start with the income plan you've heard that before and that helps us make the investment decisions versus the other way around and updating your income plan during bad markets that can also give you some confidence as well as you're looking at where we are today and then looking at over the next few years and and seeing that things maybe aren't as bad as it might seem at least when you've got those two things of the unknown and then the known updating the plan is the known and you can get a little bit better picture on what the future might look like for you now to the two things that maybe could give us an advantage during a time like this this is back to the law of polarity so the possible things that we might be able to use here are well first before I say it as always this is not specific advice to you so we're not looking at your your plan together so before you do anything just talk to a financial professional but idea number one to think about is tax loss harvesting that could be a way to write off some of the losses while still keeping your investment strategy intact and I talk about this concept a lot more in other videos so I'm not going to go into details on it today but just keep that in mind the one thing to to really pay attention to though when we're we're talking about the law or talking about tax loss harvesting is that wash sale rule right so look for the other videos or talk to that Financial professional before thinking about doing that the second thing that could be a possible opportunity for really the first time in a very long time is that ability or option to lock in higher yields in that conservative bucket as you know the the bucket strategy you've seen that before where we've got the possible three buckets and having that conservative bucket here is a great way to plan out and prepare for for bad markets and now at the time of this recording some of those historically conservative asset classes are paying a higher interest a higher yield than what we've seen really over the last decade which could be a silver lining during this period of time so those are just two things possible things to look at which maybe could be taken advantage of by you for for your benefit so those are just two things to think about during this period of time that we're in right now if that short video was helpful please like this and then share it with others if you think it could help them too and if you'd like to talk more about your plan feel free to reach out to me in the in the description below or go to our website streamlinedplanning.com for get you click on the get started button we don't always have space available but you'll hear back from me either way so I hope that was helpful and then I'll see you in the next video

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Why This Investment System Can Help Retirees Worry Less About Their Retirement Plan

I want to share an investment system for retirees to hopefully assist you as you're thinking about and planning for your retirement we're also going to look at how to prepare your retirement for the multiple potential potential economic Seasons that we may be headed into so we want to look at the multiple seasons and then the Easy System that's going to help lower taxes and then lower risk as well now if I haven't met you yet I'm Dave zoller and we help people plan for and Implement these retirement strategies really for a select number of people at streamline Financial that's our retirement planning firm but because we can't help everyone we want to share this with you as well so if you like retirement specific videos about one per week be sure to subscribe so in order to create a proper investment plan in system we want to make sure that we build out the retirement income plan first because without the income plan it's much harder to design the right investment strategy it's kind of like without the income plan it's like you're guessing at well 60 40 portfolio sounds good or you know May maybe this amount in the conservative bucket sounds reasonable you already know and and you feel that as you get close to retirement that goal of just more money isn't the the end-all goal that we should really be aiming for for retirement it's more about sustainability and certainty and then really the certainty of income and possibly less risk than before the last 30 years uh the things that you did to be successful with the financial side are going to look different than the next 20 or 30 years now if you need help defining the the income plan a little bit then look at the DIY retirement course below this video now once you do Define your goals for retirement and then the income needed to achieve those goals then creating the investment system becomes a lot easier and within the investment plan we really know that we can only control three things in all three things we actually want to minimize through this investment system the first thing we can minimize or reduce is how much tax you pay when investing we had a a client who was not a client of streamline Financial but of a tax firm coming to the the CPA firm in March to pick up his tax return and he was completely surprised that he had sixty thousand dollars of extra income on his tax return that he had to pay tax on right away before April 15th and it was due to the capital gains being recognized and other distributions within his investment account and he said but I didn't sell anything and the account didn't even go up that much last year and I got to pay tax on it but he was already in the highest tax bracket paying about close to 37 percent on short-term capital gains and dividends and interest so that was an unpleasant surprise and we see it happen more often than it should but this can really be avoided and here's two ways we can control tax so that we don't have to have that happen and really just control tax and pay less of it is the goal and I'll keep this at a high level but it'll get the the point across number one is the kinds of Investments that you own some are maybe funds or ETFs or individual uh equities or things like that the funds and ETFs they could pass on capital gains and and distributions to you each year without you even doing anything without you selling or or buying but it happens within the fund a lot of times now we would use funds and ETFs that are considered tax efficient so that our clients they can decide when to recognize gains rather than letting the fund company decide now the second way is by using a strategy that's called tlh each year there's many many fluctuations or big fluctuations that happen in an investment account and the strategy that we call tlh that allows our clients that's tax loss harvesting it allows them to sell an investment that may be down for part of the year and then move it into a very similar investment right away so that the investment strategy stays the same and they can actually take a write-off on that loss on their taxes that year now there's some rules around this again we're going high level but it offsets uh you know for that one client who are not a client but who had the big sixty thousand dollars of income he could have been offsetting those capital gains by doing tlh or tax loss harvesting that strategy has really saved hundreds and thousands of of dollars for clients over a period of years so on to the next thing that we can control in our investment plan and that's cost this one's easier but many advisors they don't do it because it ends up paying them less now since we're certified financial planner professionals we do follow the fiduciary standard and we're obligated to do what's best for our clients so tell me this if you had two Investments and they had the exact same strategy the same Returns the same risk and the same tax efficiency would you rather want the one that costs 0.05 percent per year or the one that costs 12 times more at point six percent well I know that answer is obvious and we'd go with a lower cost funds if it was all the same low-cost funds and ETFs that's how we can really help reduce the cost or that's how you can help reduce the cost in your investment plan because every basis point or part of a percentage that's saved in cost it's added to your return each year and this adds up to a lot over time now the last thing that we want to minimize and control is risk and we already talked about the flaws of investing solely based on on risk tolerance and when it comes to risk a lot of people think that term risk tolerance you know how much risk can we on a scale of one to ten where are we on the the risk factor but there's another way to look at risk in your investment strategy and like King Solomon we believe that there's a season for everything or like the if it was the bird song There's a season for everything and we also believe that there's four different seasons in investing and depending on what season we're in some Investments perform better than others and the Four Seasons are pull it up right now it's higher than expected inflation which we might be feeling but there's also a season that can be lower than expected or deflation and then there's higher than expected economic growth or lower than expected economic growth and the goal is reduce the risk in investing by making sure that we're prepared for each and every one of those potential Seasons because there are individual asset classes that tend to do well during each one of those seasons and we don't know nobody knows what's really going to happen you know people would would speculate and say oh it's going to be this or this or whatever might happen but we don't know for sure that's why we want to make sure we just have the asset classes in the right spots so that the income plan doesn't get impacted so the investment system combined with the income system clients don't have to worry about the movements in the market because they know they've got enough to weather any potential season I hope this has been helpful for you so far as you're thinking about your retirement if it was please subscribe or like this video so that hopefully other people can be helped as well and then I'll see you in the next one take care thank you

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