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Retirement Spending: Tips and Research Findings

It's hard to predict how much you're going to 
spend in retirement, but there's some really good   information out there, and using that you can take 
a look at what previous retirees have experienced   (those who have gone down the road before you) 
and you can get some tips on what you might   expect as you go into retirement. So we will look 
at some of the traditional or the most common ways   of estimating your spending, and this is what 
you might find in a lot of popular retirement   calculators, or in the so-called four percent 
rule, which is not really a rule, but it's a   historical research finding.

Those things can 
potentially cause problems and cause you to miss   out on some enjoyment, so we want to avoid that. 
We'll also get into some actual spending data,   so what are people really doing when they spend 
in retirement? And some surveys and some other   research that can help you understand what your 
spending might look like. A traditional way of   looking at your spending is all about maintaining 
purchasing power, which is very important,   you need to keep up with rising prices and be able 
to maintain the same standard of living because   if you don't factor in inflation then that can 
erode your purchasing power and make it harder   to afford the things that you want and need, so 
most calculators are going to do a fixed increase   in your spending each year and the four percent 
rule, for example, does the same thing, it just   gives you an increase in whatever inflation was 
for that year, and that continues on indefinitely,   and for an oversimplified example we can see 
something where you just take a round number   $100,000 for example and that just increases by an 
inflation amount every year until the day you die,   but it might not necessarily make sense to use a 
spending plan that just marches on blindly every   year with inflation because the reality is you 
might experience some different spending patterns   in retirement.

One example of that is David 
Blanchett's retirement spending smile, and   this gets its name from the smile shaped spending 
curve that you might see throughout the lifespan   of a typical retiree, so if we over simplify what 
this comes from it's that retirees might, or in   his research they did tend to spend at a rate that 
was slightly less than inflation it was inflation   minus one percent so this can get quite technical 
and in the weeds but what happens is over time,   those health care costs typically increase and at 
some point the line comes back up giving you that   smile shaped chart that's an over simplification, 
of course, but if you look at maybe an alternative   to plain old lock step inflation adjustments you 
might find that that's closer to the reality for   some people, and in fact, when I adjust people's 
retirement projections using the retirement   spending smile for example that often helps to 
improve their chances of success another spending   pattern is the go-go slow-go and no-go years and 
this assumes that right after you retire you're   at your healthiest and you're very eager to do 
all of those things that you've dreamed about   doing in retirement, so you go ahead and take 
those trips and spend a lot of money on travel   and entertainment and all the other things that 
you might not have had the time to do during your   working years at some point we shift from that go 
go phase into a slow go phase and that might be   because you've done a lot of the things you want 
to do and you might be getting older and have less   energy or desire as a result your spending can 
decrease during that phase and then you go into   a no-go phase and that is where you're going to 
be a lot less active a lot less money goes towards   travel but you still have some entertainment 
and leisure but most importantly those health   care costs tend to pick up and that mirrors what 
you see with the retirement spending smile in the   no go phase you're going to spend a lot more on 
health care and a lot less on other things.

By   the way, I'm Justin Pritchard, and I help people 
plan for retirement and invest for the future. So   in the description for this video you can find 
some of the information we're talking about,   links to these articles as well as some other 
resources and calculators and tools that can   help you as you do your own retirement plan.

So, 
how much will you spend in retirement? Well there   are a couple of different ways to estimate that 
and try and arrive at the number that should be   your spending target we have a couple of them 
shown here one is an income replacement ratio   that's often something like eighty percent ninety 
percent even a hundred percent especially in the   early years of retirement or those go go years but 
it might not need to be 100 of what you're earning   during your working years and that's because 
you're no longer going to be paying payroll taxes   in retirement, you might not be saving money each 
year in retirement accounts because you're already   retired, and if you commute to work, for example, 
you no longer have those expenses that said,   you will have more time on your hands, and so the 
question becomes are you going to do things that   cost money and how does that compare to your 
pre-retirement spending I've got other videos   that talk about these techniques in more detail so 
we're just going to keep it brief on that the next   is if you look at your actual spending and there 
are a couple of ways to do this depending on   your preferences and your patience and how much 
information you have available so a bottom-up   approach is going to be where you actually track 
your spending and you look at where your money   goes so how much goes to housing how much goes to 
utilities food including the grocery store versus   dining out and any other types of food you're 
essentially going to tally up everything that   you spend money on and assume that that might 
be similar to what you spend in retirement   now there will be some changes again you might 
not commute anymore or you might even have bigger   changes like at some point the mortgage gets paid 
off or you stop supporting children or something   like that but you might assume that your spending 
is roughly the same as what you spend now although   it could make sense to add in things like vacation 
spending the challenge with a bottom-up approach   is that it's assuming that you have everything 
because it seems very detailed but you might   miss things so it can seem very precise but it 
might still be wrong and that can be problematic   a different way to do it that might catch some 
of those things that you often miss is a top-down   approach and that's going to be where you start 
with your income you know how much you're bringing   in and you subtract out any taxes and any savings 
and other things that you don't actually spend   money on and the amount that's left over is what 
you could assume is what you actually spend on   things and you don't know how much you spend 
on each thing but you know that the money goes   somewhere it didn't go to taxes or into a savings 
account so it went somewhere and again you might   assume that you'll continue to spend at a similar 
level but maybe you need to make some adjustments   again like maybe additional vacation spending it 
can also make sense to assume that that's going   to change so if you subscribe to the model of 
the go-go slow-go no-go years, those vacation   expenditures could be high in the early years of 
retirement and then maybe you want to assume that   those taper off at some point although healthcare 
spending should pick up with either technique   whether it's the top down or the bottom up you 
want to make sure that you catch all of those   infrequent expenses so those might be annual 
costs maybe you pay your property taxes each year   or maybe you buy a new vehicle periodically those 
are things that you might not catch if you just   take a snapshot of one year's spending or even 
a couple of months of spending it's easy to miss   those things so be sure to add those in as you do 
this exercise and a third technique for estimating   your spending is a lifestyle range so you might 
pick a round number a lot of people like to pick   a hundred thousand dollars for example and say 
I would be comfortable if I'm able to spend that   the challenge is it's not very close necessarily 
to what you actually spend and what seems to   happen, this isn't always the case, but what 
seems to happen is people often pick a number   that's too high so it might be more money than 
they need but it seems like a nice round number   that would be comfortable unfortunately if you 
pick too high that can be problematic because   you might need to save more each year you might 
need to work longer to make the numbers work out   and that can be problematic if you don't get to 
enjoy life as much as you would hope here's just   one example where we say somebody's currently 
earning 100 but they save some money in a 401k   they have some payroll taxes and both of those 
are going to go away once they stop working   you will still have income taxes in 
retirement the question is going to be   how much exactly but you don't necessarily need to 
spend and you probably today don't currently spend   a full 100 000 even if you currently earn 100 
000.

Now time for a friendly reminder that this   is just a short video and it can't possibly cover 
everything and it's not made with any knowledge   of what you have going on, so please do a lot 
more research, please talk with professionals,   talk with a financial planner talk, with a CPA 
and an attorney, and that way, you reduce the   chances dramatically of having any problems. 
So hit pause read that if you need more time,   and we'll move on. So where do retirees actually 
spend their money what do other people spend their   money on and we have some nice information that 
can help paint the picture that might be useful   for you might make some light bulbs go on for 
you this is some anonymized data that looks at   actual transactions in people's bank accounts so 
they can't see exactly who spent what on what but   they categorize it and in the aggregate they're 
looking at where money goes for people who are   at least partially retired so they might have some 
retirement income or they're spending from their   assets by the way this does show households with 
investable wealth of $1 to $3 million so that's   relatively wealthy most people don't have that 
much so this might not be exactly where you fall   in the world but it can at least help paint a 
picture of what it looks like for some people   in retirement what you'll notice not surprisingly 
is that those health care costs do increase over   time and it might not be as much as you think 
especially once you're on medicare the costs   can be somewhat under control especially if you 
don't have major health issues maybe you have some   supplemental or other types of coverage to help 
manage those costs and charitable giving increases   as well but things like transportation and travel 
tend to decrease as a part of your spending over   time and going back to the retirement spending 
stages you can almost see those here where the   spending starts out high in your 60s but then it 
declines and at some point it tilts back up again   and that is primarily going to be because health 
care is catching up with you by the way if you're   looking at that housing category and that seems to 
almost increase later in life it's not something   that we can necessarily know for sure but some 
people might speculate that that has to do with   maybe home modifications for those who want to age 
in place or maybe they're getting some long-term   care at home so that can contribute to this 
massive housing category and looking at data from   the BLS this might be more typical for the average 
household you can see some similar patterns here   so it's about 64 000 of spending per year 
for those age 55 to 64 maybe approaching   or just beginning retirement once they're above 
65 that decreases to about 52 000 and of course   over age 75 it's even lower interestingly 
on this one you do see some decreasing   transportation costs but you don't necessarily see 
quite as much of a tick up in the healthcare costs   in the consumer expenditures survey so that showed 
us how much people actually spend whether they are   among the more wealthy or if they're typical 
households so let's get into some logistics so   after a lifetime of savings it may be foreign 
to you to stop putting money into accounts and   start taking money back out so how exactly do 
you do that again we're going to cover a lot of   ground in this video but this will be just a brief 
treatment of the topic spending from your assets   is relatively easy typically you just need to sell 
something that you have if you have it invested   convert it to cash and then take the cash 
out that's often something you can automate   or you can have somebody handle for you 
but if you use mutual funds for example   it's really logistically quite easy to do a 
lot of people will take assets from a workplace   retirement plan like a 401k 403 b and move 
that into an IRA that you control and there are   generally no tax consequences as long as you make 
the transfer properly and don't necessarily take   possession of the money from there you have a lot 
more distribution options you can typically just   link your bank account and maybe you can go online 
or call somebody up and have the funds zapped over   to your bank account within just a couple of 
days and that can recreate or you can automate   and you can recreate what feels like a monthly 
paycheck you always have to be mindful of taxes so   definitely speak with a CPA or a professional as 
you set all of that up and start making decisions   because you don't want to get any tax penalties or 
pay any unnecessary taxes so you're going to want   to be mindful of this throughout retirement all 
that said it's not necessarily the best move in   every case to move money out of an employer plan 
it might be best just to leave assets where they   are at least for a while or maybe indefinitely 
and that's especially true if you have really   low costs in your employer plan and if you have a 
lot of options in terms of managing the logistics   and getting money out quickly and easily 
whenever you need it for more details on that   check out this other video that should hopefully 
pop up and covers the topic in much more detail   so let's get into some tips that can hopefully 
help you manage your spending and maximize your   spending so that you can enjoy retirement as much 
as possible the first thing to think about is   again you want to be tax aware and that might mean 
paying taxes even though you don't need to so as   you start spending from your assets you're going 
to choose where you pull the money from it might   be a Roth account might be a pre-tax IRA it might 
be a taxable brokerage account or a bank account   so the choices you make are going to affect what 
taxes you pay later and this can be a big deal   especially much later in retirement so you want to 
be looking ahead as you make these decisions it's   not just this year's tax bill it is the next 10 or 
20 years worth of costs that you're going to pay   so for example by paying some taxes intentionally 
at a reasonable rate that you're comfortable with   you might be able to reduce the required minimum 
distributions or RMDs that you have to take later   in life typically after age 72 and that can be 
helpful because again you don't get a big chunk   when you don't want it and also when you're taking 
money out and it adds to your taxable income   that could cause more or most of your social 
security to be taxable and it can also affect how   much you're going to pay for health care so your 
medicare premiums might depend on what your income   is so you want to look at all of these different 
moving parts as you decide what to do and where   to pull money from and maybe doing things like 
Roth conversions even cash reserves often make   retirees more comfortable and that can be helpful 
in times when the markets go down and you don't   want to take withdrawals from things that are at 
a big loss because that can take a big bite out of   your total assets and it can derail a retirement 
plan so if you choose to have some cash reserves   whether it's a couple of years worth or some 
other amount that can be something you hold in   a bank account or other very safe cash equivalent 
type investments or vehicles and that way you can   still spend with confidence without having to 
worry about am i ruining my retirement income   now things can still go badly or they can go badly 
for longer than you expect or want but having a   cash buffer in some cases can certainly improve 
your chances it's also helpful to maximize your   income because that's what supports a lot of your 
spending so part of the spending that you do each   year in retirement comes from withdrawals from 
those assets but the base of your spending or the   base of your total income might be social security 
and pensions or other types of income so whatever   you can do to improve those that's going to help 
you and make it easier to keep spending on the   things you want so social security for example is 
a really helpful tool for spending in retirement   that's because it's a government guaranteed 
and inflation adjusted source of income so if   you can maximize your social security benefits 
without messing up other parts of your finances   that can be helpful so it might make sense not 
to claim as early as possible unless you have   reasons for doing so because you get that nice 
inflation-adjusted payment later that can help you   keep up with your spending and it's also helpful 
to run some numbers as you approach retirement   preferably several years or more beforehand it 
can be surprisingly enlightening to run those   numbers and just play with some calculators that 
way you might identify some opportunities or some   potential problems but the best way to do that is 
just to play with the numbers see how things might   unfold look at some different cash flows how they 
might come out what taxes are you going to pay   what if things go well what if things go not so 
well and by doing that you can learn a lot about   what things might look like for you.

So I hope you 
found this helpful. If you did. please support the   effort by sharing this with somebody or leaving 
a quick thumbs up. Thank you, and take care.

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2 Ways to Estimate Retirement Spending

When you're planning for retirement, your spending level is one of the most important pieces of the puzzle, so how much should you plan to spend each year? That's going to dictate what we are withdrawing from your investments and how that needs to supplement your Social Security, pensions, and that sort of thing. So we're going to go over two methods that you can use to fairly easily figure out what your spending might look like in retirement. As you go through this exercise, it's important to remember that no method is perfect and it's impossible to predict the future, so we don't know what your grocery bill is going to be in 14 years, or how much you'll spend on electricity in 12 years, but what we can do is make some reasonable guesses and estimates and take action based on that, take a step forward and then learn a few things and then adjust if adjustments need to be made. So the two ways of figuring out your budget I want to talk about today are the top down and the bottom up approach, and there are a couple of other ways to estimate your retirement spending need as well.

So the replacement ratio is a pretty popular one, and that's where you say, I might need, let's say, 80% or some other percentage of my current income to spend in retirement, hopefully it's a relatively high number, but there… You're just basically saying, Well, I'm not going to save for retirement anymore, I'm not going to be paying payroll taxes, so maybe 80 90 or some other percentage is an appropriate amount, but we're going to go over again, top down and Bottom up, so starting with top down, the top down strategy focuses on the amount you spend and is not as concerned with the destination of those dollars or the specific costs that you pay, all that that information is important, and we're probably going to want it, but when we look at a top down approach, we say, What is all of the income minus the savings you do? And the answer is your costs or your total spending, so we don't know necessarily exactly where that money went, but it went somewhere…

Okay, so you had income, you save some money in some different places, the rest of it went away and it's not your money anymore, so that's the top down approach, so how do we figure out the income? The best place or the very top is to start with your pay stubs or your income tax returns, so those are going to capture even dollars that never hit your bank account, so for example, you can say, my total income is X, but I put money into my workplace plan, my 401k, that money is never going to show up in your bank account, you're not going to see it as a line item in your transactions where you saved money, but you did indeed save that money, you didn't spend it on something else, you can spend it later, so if we start with the income sources from a very high level, we're talking about your pay stubs and your tax returns, then we look at the savings, so this is going to be all of the additions you make to various accounts, so that's going to be your 401K, 403B, any bank savings accounts, HSAs, IRAS, any place that you're saving money for the future, this is going to get subtracted from that income number we came up with, so we have our income at a high level, we have the savings that we did, we subtract that, then the result is the total spending, and again, we're not totally concerned with exactly where the money went.

Although if there is a problem, a spending issue or something like that, then we definitely want to look closer. Naturally, there are pros and cons of any approach, so the advantages of this top down strategy are going to be that it's really easy and it gives you a big picture view, and it captures really pretty much everything, it might capture too much, so we'll talk about that in a second, but if you are not sure exactly where your money goes, but you're doing okay budget wise, and you want to keep the same lifestyle basically that you currently have, then this can be a decent way to estimate how much you might spend later in life, so we don't know how much of it went on vacation versus dining versus whatever, but you did spend the money somewhere, and that's really what we need to know is how much do you spend…

But this could capture some costs that you aren't going to have in retirement, so for example, your payroll taxes are going to be something that we want to think about if we're using this top down approach, because when you stop working, you'll no longer have those payroll taxes. Likewise, if you have a mortgage and you're doing monthly mortgage payments at some point that loan might go away and that won't be an expense for you in retirement, you would generally still have taxes and insurance, but you wouldn't have the principal and interest portion of your mortgage payment at some point down the road, hopefully.

So again, with top down, we start with this big picture view, income minus savings equals expenses, and then maybe we want to make some adjustments for certain things that are going to change over time, so here's a little example of how it looks visually, you've got your income of 100,000 you're over age 50, you're doing 27,000 into your 401K, you've got an IRA as well, there's another 7,000 that you're saving. And so your actual spending is no more than 66,000, and it's probably even less than that when we think about payroll taxes and maybe a couple of other things, so think about this as you evaluate what your costs might be, sometimes people think I make 100,000 right now, so I'm going to need a 100000 of income every year in retirement, and that's often not the case, and this is another way to illustrate that point, in fact, those are the types of exercises I often go through with clients, by the way, I'm Justin.

Pritchard, and I help people plan for retirement and invest for the future, so in the description below, there's going to be more on this topic, on your spending and just some other general retirement planning type resources that I think will be really helpful for you. So please check those out, and it's also a good time for a friendly reminder that this is just general information, it's a short video that can't possibly cover everything, so please check with some experts before you make some important decisions. Next, we have the bottom up approach, and so this is going to be what you might be more familiar with as just budgeting, so that's looking at every single expense and transaction and categorizing those costs and figuring out where exactly your money goes.

So you're really looking closely at the destination of each dollar that leaves your household, so you have a detailed view of what's happening, you can get this information from places like your credit card statement, so every time you spend money, there's an electronic record of it. You can categorize that and track it, your bank account is also probably a good place to look, so if you have those electronic automatic payments that go out of your bank account, maybe your mortgage or your insurance payments, that kind of thing… Those are going to be important to know about and include in your budget. Even a check register. So you might only write one or two checks a year these days, but they're probably big ones and they're probably important to know about, so make sure you're tracking that if it's a charitable contributions, or maybe you pay your property taxes once a year by check, that sort of thing, we need to know about those so that you can continue that type of spending.

This technique really relies on you being able to track and find and categorize that information, so it's probably a decent idea to just cross check this with a top down approach, so say, Well, here's what I think I spend based on my budget, based on all the things I tracked and looked at, but let's just see if that more or less adds up based on my income versus how much I put into different accounts, and are we in the ballpark? Just like with the top down approach, it's important to pay attention to any costs that might change over time. So if you are making mortgage payments again and you're going to have that loan paid off at some point, want to look at what's the principal and interest portion of that payment, and what's the taxes and insurance portion, and keep those separated, you know that you'll continue to pay taxes and insurance, but not the principal and interest at some point down the road.

Again, there are pros and cons to this, just like everything else, it's probably a decent way to go if you are very close to retirement because you're going to be spending in a similar way next year or two years from now, as you are today, so your current budget might be a nice reflection of what the next couple of years budget could look like, one of the drawbacks though, is that this can give you a false sense of precision, so you've got your list and your spreadsheet and you've got you exactly how much you paid for a bagel eight months ago, and you know exactly where your money is going, but you might be missing something, that's really the main risk is that you could be missing some important expenses, so that if you base your spending off of your spreadsheet or your list, it might not be nearly as accurate as you think it is.

So I hope you found that helpful. If you did, please leave a quick thumbs up. Thank you and take care..

As found on YouTube

Retirement Planning Home

Read More

2 Ways to Estimate Retirement Spending

When you're planning for retirement, your spending level is one of the most important pieces of the puzzle, so how much should you plan to spend each year? That's going to dictate what we are withdrawing from your investments and how that needs to supplement your Social Security, pensions, and that sort of thing. So we're going to go over two methods that you can use to fairly easily figure out what your spending might look like in retirement.

As you go through this exercise, it's important to remember that no method is perfect and it's impossible to predict the future, so we don't know what your grocery bill is going to be in 14 years, or how much you'll spend on electricity in 12 years, but what we can do is make some reasonable guesses and estimates and take action based on that, take a step forward and then learn a few things and then adjust if adjustments need to be made. So the two ways of figuring out your budget I want to talk about today are the top down and the bottom up approach, and there are a couple of other ways to estimate your retirement spending need as well.

So the replacement ratio is a pretty popular one, and that's where you say, I might need, let's say, 80% or some other percentage of my current income to spend in retirement, hopefully it's a relatively high number, but there… You're just basically saying, Well, I'm not going to save for retirement anymore, I'm not going to be paying payroll taxes, so maybe 80 90 or some other percentage is an appropriate amount, but we're going to go over again, top down and Bottom up, so starting with top down, the top down strategy focuses on the amount you spend and is not as concerned with the destination of those dollars or the specific costs that you pay, all that that information is important, and we're probably going to want it, but when we look at a top down approach, we say, What is all of the income minus the savings you do? And the answer is your costs or your total spending, so we don't know necessarily exactly where that money went, but it went somewhere… Okay, so you had income, you save some money in some different places, the rest of it went away and it's not your money anymore, so that's the top down approach, so how do we figure out the income? The best place or the very top is to start with your pay stubs or your income tax returns, so those are going to capture even dollars that never hit your bank account, so for example, you can say, my total income is X, but I put money into my workplace plan, my 401k, that money is never going to show up in your bank account, you're not going to see it as a line item in your transactions where you saved money, but you did indeed save that money, you didn't spend it on something else, you can spend it later, so if we start with the income sources from a very high level, we're talking about your pay stubs and your tax returns, then we look at the savings, so this is going to be all of the additions you make to various accounts, so that's going to be your 401K, 403B, any bank savings accounts, HSAs, IRAS, any place that you're saving money for the future, this is going to get subtracted from that income number we came up with, so we have our income at a high level, we have the savings that we did, we subtract that, then the result is the total spending, and again, we're not totally concerned with exactly where the money went.

Although if there is a problem, a spending issue or something like that, then we definitely want to look closer. Naturally, there are pros and cons of any approach, so the advantages of this top down strategy are going to be that it's really easy and it gives you a big picture view, and it captures really pretty much everything, it might capture too much, so we'll talk about that in a second, but if you are not sure exactly where your money goes, but you're doing okay budget wise, and you want to keep the same lifestyle basically that you currently have, then this can be a decent way to estimate how much you might spend later in life, so we don't know how much of it went on vacation versus dining versus whatever, but you did spend the money somewhere, and that's really what we need to know is how much do you spend…

But this could capture some costs that you aren't going to have in retirement, so for example, your payroll taxes are going to be something that we want to think about if we're using this top down approach, because when you stop working, you'll no longer have those payroll taxes. Likewise, if you have a mortgage and you're doing monthly mortgage payments at some point that loan might go away and that won't be an expense for you in retirement, you would generally still have taxes and insurance, but you wouldn't have the principal and interest portion of your mortgage payment at some point down the road, hopefully.

So again, with top down, we start with this big picture view, income minus savings equals expenses, and then maybe we want to make some adjustments for certain things that are going to change over time, so here's a little example of how it looks visually, you've got your income of 100,000 you're over age 50, you're doing 27,000 into your 401K, you've got an IRA as well, there's another 7,000 that you're saving. And so your actual spending is no more than 66,000, and it's probably even less than that when we think about payroll taxes and maybe a couple of other things, so think about this as you evaluate what your costs might be, sometimes people think I make 100,000 right now, so I'm going to need a 100000 of income every year in retirement, and that's often not the case, and this is another way to illustrate that point, in fact, those are the types of exercises I often go through with clients, by the way, I'm Justin. Pritchard, and I help people plan for retirement and invest for the future, so in the description below, there's going to be more on this topic, on your spending and just some other general retirement planning type resources that I think will be really helpful for you.

So please check those out, and it's also a good time for a friendly reminder that this is just general information, it's a short video that can't possibly cover everything, so please check with some experts before you make some important decisions. Next, we have the bottom up approach, and so this is going to be what you might be more familiar with as just budgeting, so that's looking at every single expense and transaction and categorizing those costs and figuring out where exactly your money goes. So you're really looking closely at the destination of each dollar that leaves your household, so you have a detailed view of what's happening, you can get this information from places like your credit card statement, so every time you spend money, there's an electronic record of it.

You can categorize that and track it, your bank account is also probably a good place to look, so if you have those electronic automatic payments that go out of your bank account, maybe your mortgage or your insurance payments, that kind of thing… Those are going to be important to know about and include in your budget. Even a check register. So you might only write one or two checks a year these days, but they're probably big ones and they're probably important to know about, so make sure you're tracking that if it's a charitable contributions, or maybe you pay your property taxes once a year by check, that sort of thing, we need to know about those so that you can continue that type of spending. This technique really relies on you being able to track and find and categorize that information, so it's probably a decent idea to just cross check this with a top down approach, so say, Well, here's what I think I spend based on my budget, based on all the things I tracked and looked at, but let's just see if that more or less adds up based on my income versus how much I put into different accounts, and are we in the ballpark? Just like with the top down approach, it's important to pay attention to any costs that might change over time.

So if you are making mortgage payments again and you're going to have that loan paid off at some point, want to look at what's the principal and interest portion of that payment, and what's the taxes and insurance portion, and keep those separated, you know that you'll continue to pay taxes and insurance, but not the principal and interest at some point down the road. Again, there are pros and cons to this, just like everything else, it's probably a decent way to go if you are very close to retirement because you're going to be spending in a similar way next year or two years from now, as you are today, so your current budget might be a nice reflection of what the next couple of years budget could look like, one of the drawbacks though, is that this can give you a false sense of precision, so you've got your list and your spreadsheet and you've got you exactly how much you paid for a bagel eight months ago, and you know exactly where your money is going, but you might be missing something, that's really the main risk is that you could be missing some important expenses, so that if you base your spending off of your spreadsheet or your list, it might not be nearly as accurate as you think it is.

So I hope you found that helpful. If you did, please leave a quick thumbs up. Thank you and take care..

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Is a Retirement Bucket Strategy Right for You?

Making your money last in retirement can be tricky, so it's worth asking if a bucketing strategy might help you address some of the biggest challenges you face. So in particular, we're talking about number one having the confidence to stop working and start spending. That can be terrifying even for those of you who are well prepared. You might have assets and a healthy income from social security and pensions, but still it's kind of terrifying to walk away from a job with a steady income and some nice health care. You might also need to invest at least some portion of your assets for long term growth, and that's because we all face the risk of inflation or rising prices over time.

So if your assets aren't growing then you may lose purchasing power over decades in retirement, and that can be a problem. Then a third issue is of course that sequence of returns risk, and this is when you are selling assets especially at the beginning of your retirement when markets are down, if there happens to be a crash at the beginning of your retirement years, if you're selling assets during that event it can really take a bigger bite out of your portfolio and increase the risk of you running out of money later in life, and we don't want that. So let's spend the next couple of minutes talking about retirement bucket strategies. We'll go over some examples, maybe look at how to start it and manage it over time, and then discuss if it's the right move for you. I will mention that I don't see a lot of clients using this beyond a two bucket approach, but it's still nice to know these concepts so that you can either rule it out if you're not going to use it or get some good ideas. Bucketing is also known as time segmentation.

In other words, you have different buckets of assets that you can pull from over different time frames, and the promise of this is that hopefully you would be able to avoid selling assets when they're down and you can be confident that you have the funds you need for your withdrawals and your spending. So you always have a cash bucket and this involves money that you might be spending next week or next month.

This is relatively safe money, and then beyond that you might have one or more additional buckets that are invested a bit differently, and we'll talk about that in just a minute. It's important for you to know that you can customize this in any way you want. We're just going to go over some examples that are concepts, but whether you use two buckets or three buckets or make the time frames different, maybe you want four years worth of cash for example, these are all things that you can customize to suit your preferences. One of the simplest approaches is a two bucket strategy.

So you've got just that one bucket for several years worth of spending. You might set aside enough cash to satisfy let's say one to three years worth of withdrawals if you needed to take money out of investments and you didn't want to sell investments because they're down perhaps. The second bucket is maybe a total return portfolio. It might be invested according to whatever is right for your risk preferences, your needs, and your tolerance, and you would know that given that you have some cash set aside you don't need to dip into that bucket for at least four years or so. Now keep in mind that this isn't rigid so you don't need to necessarily start by spending from your cash bucket.

If the markets are doing well and your investments are gaining value it might make sense just to spend from those investments and leave that cash bucket as is and it's there for if you ever need it. So if there is ever a market crash it is already loaded with cash that you can draw on and you can worry a lot less about what the markets are doing. So you can see some of the investments in bucket number one. These are cash equivalents basically it might even be in a savings account or CDs. You could look at T bills if you wanted and other types of things. Again this is up to you but the point is you might feel really confident if you have this money set aside. And by the way it's probably a good idea to start building up this cash bucket a few years before retirement so that once you reach day one of retirement you have this money set aside already. In the second bucket of course you have a diversified portfolio so that might be mutual funds and ETFs, maybe some individual stocks and bonds, whatever it is that you invest in according to whatever is appropriate for you as an investor.

So if that's a 60 40 for example you do that maybe you have more risk or less risk or alternatives or something else. We'll look at some deeper examples next but first I want to mention I'm Justin Pritchard and I help people plan for retirement and invest for the future, and in the description below you're going to find more information on bucketing, some resources from Christine Benz, as well as just some general retirement planning resources and information. I think you will find all of that really helpful so please check that out. And by the way it's just a friendly reminder that this is just a short video it can't possibly cover everything. You can still run out of money even if you use a bucketing strategy so triple check all of this with some professionals and be aware that there is always some risk and uncertainty in the retirement planning world. Now moving on to a three bucket example we have those same two buckets as before but we've added an income bucket so this is in between the cash withdrawal bucket and the longer term growth bucket.

You might prefer to set aside an extra bucket. I'm not sure that you necessarily need this bucket but you could include things that kick off higher levels of income perhaps longer term bonds and CDs maybe some dividend stocks if you have the appetite for that kind of risk and anything else that comes to mind that might help create some income that can go into bucket number one. If we look at this three bucket example depending on how you set it up you might have roughly or almost 10 years worth of withdrawals in relatively safe assets.

You've got a couple of years in cash so that's going to be really safe and then the income is a little bit more risk but not quite everything in the stock market like your growth bucket you could potentially pull from those assets for up to 10 years before you need to go and sell from your growth bucket and of course the past doesn't necessarily repeat, there are no guarantees but if we look historically there's a decent chance that you wouldn't be selling at least at steep losses and you might not be selling at any losses if you have a diversified portfolio over a rolling 10 year period, again can't predict the future, then if you really wanted to you could add more buckets but that really gets complicated, and speaking of complicated, let's get into bucket maintenance or bucket management.

This is really where you start to see some cracks in getting too complicated with this strategy or using too many buckets it's easy enough to design a bucket strategy in theory so you can set up the amounts you want and figure out how many years they should last and on your retirement date and in the early months you will have a lovely set of buckets, you've got the exact amount in each one and the investment mix in each one is exactly what you want, but at some point, life might happen, if you get into an extended downturn or even a flat market or if you have huge expenses that you didn't expect at some point we need to figure out how exactly you're going to be moving assets from one bucket to the next again when things are going well you're typically going to maybe just sell from those investment assets and not even use bucket number one the safe money you might just take profits off the top of whatever your growth investments are doing during the good times and meanwhile you might be sending income let's say dividends or capital gains payments over from the income and growth buckets into bucket number one and that can help to build that up or replenish it from any withdrawals that you might have taken but if you really start drawing from bucket one that safe bucket how exactly do we decide when and how to put money back in well one way is to use a systematic approach and that might be one example is going to be just every time period whether it's every six months every year you take some money out of the subsequent buckets and pull it forward into your cash bucket that can kind of defeat the purpose of bucketing because the idea is that you don't want to do things systematically you want to be more opportunistic and not just sell every six months but you want to avoid selling when investments are down to make a slight improvement on that you could look at a rebalancing strategy so you just take profits off the top of whatever did well and sell those assets and put the proceeds into bucket number one so if stocks did really well you're taking money out of stocks putting it into cash if bonds did really well and stocks suffered you would sell some bonds to get back into balance and then move that money over into the cash bucket you could also look at more opportunistic approaches and these border on market timing but you might say that maybe you have some rules you could say if something rises by more than five percent during a quarter or during a month for example you're going to sell some of that get it back down to a smaller proportion and take the sales proceeds put that into cash your bucket maintenance gets really complicated at some point especially if the markets don't behave so I would say you want to do a lot more thinking ahead and a lot more research if this is something you're considering look at some of the discussions with Christine Benz from Morningstar there are a number of those here on YouTube and she talks about that in more detail and proposes maybe some simplified ways of going about this which might take us right back to the two bucket approach really quickly how do you set this up in the first place well one way to do it is to use different accounts so your cash bucket is in cash and that might be in savings accounts CDs banks credit unions or even a conservative brokerage account then you might have your other buckets in different accounts and that way you can keep a balance of whatever the assets are in that account you can rebalance that account and the cash bucket is unaffected so it might make sense to do that but if you prefer you could do all of this in one account so for example you could have a couple of years worth of withdrawals sitting in cash or in a money market fund in a brokerage account then the subsequent money or the rest of the buckets would be in other investments inside of that same account ultimately this comes down to your preferences and what's going to be easiest for you to keep track of because that's really important you have to manage this over time it isn't just setting it up once and then letting it run you really do need to keep paying attention to it so I've hinted at some of the potential challenges here and I'm going to propose what I think is a simpler way of doing that and explain exactly why I think that but again it can be hard to manage this over time you don't always know what the next step is and so you might be kind of figuring things out and winging it as you go and that kind of defeats the purpose of setting up a structured process at the beginning if you aren't really sure what you're going to do with it as the years pass this can also be a cash heavy approach so you might have several years worth of withdrawals sitting in cash and that's not necessarily a bad idea but for some people given how everything is set up that can potentially mean that they don't have much that is invested for longer term growth so you want to think about that as you explore all of this and of course there are no guarantees so there could be extended draw downs that cause you to wipe out one bucket then the next and then get right into those growth assets selling exactly when you don't want to sell you can still have problems with this approach so what are some decent alternatives to bucketing you're obviously looking for a solution that can provide some peace of mind and give you a reasonable path forward as you figure out how to spend down the assets that you have one solution might be total return investing and that's where you just have a diversified portfolio that is tailored to your needs it has the right risk level and then a cash reserve so basically we're just talking about two buckets here if you want to look at it that way you've got a couple of years let's say worth of money in cash that can satisfy withdrawals during market downturns and the rest of it is invested I think you'll find that this functions similarly to what everybody thinks about as a bucket strategy so what you're doing with that approach is you want to keep the portfolio in balance so a couple of options number one is you can just sell what's been doing well and generate cash that's kind of like what we were talking about with bucketing or you might keep the portfolio in balance every six months for example or when it gets out of different tolerance ranges you might get it back into balance but effectively you're still selling your winners there and then putting it into the portfolio balance and then whenever you want to add cash you would just sell everything proportionally but you have been previously selling your winners to keep the portfolio in balance it's not exactly the same as a three bucket strategy for example but it can function somewhat similarly and another approach is to look at guardrails this is different than bucketing and looking at what to sell and when but it might be a different way to figure out exactly how much you can spend and avoid running out of money during retirement that's a topic for another video but it's something to look into if you're exploring these ideas so I hope you found this helpful if you did please leave a quick thumbs up thank you and take care.

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2 Ways to Estimate Retirement Spending

When you're planning for retirement, your spending level is one of the most important pieces of the puzzle, so how much should you plan to spend each year? That's going to dictate what we are withdrawing from your investments and how that needs to supplement your Social Security, pensions, and that sort of thing. So we're going to go over two methods that you can use to fairly easily figure out what your spending might look like in retirement. As you go through this exercise, it's important to remember that no method is perfect and it's impossible to predict the future, so we don't know what your grocery bill is going to be in 14 years, or how much you'll spend on electricity in 12 years, but what we can do is make some reasonable guesses and estimates and take action based on that, take a step forward and then learn a few things and then adjust if adjustments need to be made.

So the two ways of figuring out your budget I want to talk about today are the top down and the bottom up approach, and there are a couple of other ways to estimate your retirement spending need as well. So the replacement ratio is a pretty popular one, and that's where you say, I might need, let's say, 80% or some other percentage of my current income to spend in retirement, hopefully it's a relatively high number, but there…

You're just basically saying, Well, I'm not going to save for retirement anymore, I'm not going to be paying payroll taxes, so maybe 80 90 or some other percentage is an appropriate amount, but we're going to go over again, top down and Bottom up, so starting with top down, the top down strategy focuses on the amount you spend and is not as concerned with the destination of those dollars or the specific costs that you pay, all that that information is important, and we're probably going to want it, but when we look at a top down approach, we say, What is all of the income minus the savings you do? And the answer is your costs or your total spending, so we don't know necessarily exactly where that money went, but it went somewhere… Okay, so you had income, you save some money in some different places, the rest of it went away and it's not your money anymore, so that's the top down approach, so how do we figure out the income? The best place or the very top is to start with your pay stubs or your income tax returns, so those are going to capture even dollars that never hit your bank account, so for example, you can say, my total income is X, but I put money into my workplace plan, my 401k, that money is never going to show up in your bank account, you're not going to see it as a line item in your transactions where you saved money, but you did indeed save that money, you didn't spend it on something else, you can spend it later, so if we start with the income sources from a very high level, we're talking about your pay stubs and your tax returns, then we look at the savings, so this is going to be all of the additions you make to various accounts, so that's going to be your 401K, 403B, any bank savings accounts, HSAs, IRAS, any place that you're saving money for the future, this is going to get subtracted from that income number we came up with, so we have our income at a high level, we have the savings that we did, we subtract that, then the result is the total spending, and again, we're not totally concerned with exactly where the money went.

Although if there is a problem, a spending issue or something like that, then we definitely want to look closer. Naturally, there are pros and cons of any approach, so the advantages of this top down strategy are going to be that it's really easy and it gives you a big picture view, and it captures really pretty much everything, it might capture too much, so we'll talk about that in a second, but if you are not sure exactly where your money goes, but you're doing okay budget wise, and you want to keep the same lifestyle basically that you currently have, then this can be a decent way to estimate how much you might spend later in life, so we don't know how much of it went on vacation versus dining versus whatever, but you did spend the money somewhere, and that's really what we need to know is how much do you spend…

But this could capture some costs that you aren't going to have in retirement, so for example, your payroll taxes are going to be something that we want to think about if we're using this top down approach, because when you stop working, you'll no longer have those payroll taxes. Likewise, if you have a mortgage and you're doing monthly mortgage payments at some point that loan might go away and that won't be an expense for you in retirement, you would generally still have taxes and insurance, but you wouldn't have the principal and interest portion of your mortgage payment at some point down the road, hopefully. So again, with top down, we start with this big picture view, income minus savings equals expenses, and then maybe we want to make some adjustments for certain things that are going to change over time, so here's a little example of how it looks visually, you've got your income of 100,000 you're over age 50, you're doing 27,000 into your 401K, you've got an IRA as well, there's another 7,000 that you're saving.

And so your actual spending is no more than 66,000, and it's probably even less than that when we think about payroll taxes and maybe a couple of other things, so think about this as you evaluate what your costs might be, sometimes people think I make 100,000 right now, so I'm going to need a 100000 of income every year in retirement, and that's often not the case, and this is another way to illustrate that point, in fact, those are the types of exercises I often go through with clients, by the way, I'm Justin. Pritchard, and I help people plan for retirement and invest for the future, so in the description below, there's going to be more on this topic, on your spending and just some other general retirement planning type resources that I think will be really helpful for you. So please check those out, and it's also a good time for a friendly reminder that this is just general information, it's a short video that can't possibly cover everything, so please check with some experts before you make some important decisions.

Next, we have the bottom up approach, and so this is going to be what you might be more familiar with as just budgeting, so that's looking at every single expense and transaction and categorizing those costs and figuring out where exactly your money goes. So you're really looking closely at the destination of each dollar that leaves your household, so you have a detailed view of what's happening, you can get this information from places like your credit card statement, so every time you spend money, there's an electronic record of it. You can categorize that and track it, your bank account is also probably a good place to look, so if you have those electronic automatic payments that go out of your bank account, maybe your mortgage or your insurance payments, that kind of thing…

Those are going to be important to know about and include in your budget. Even a check register. So you might only write one or two checks a year these days, but they're probably big ones and they're probably important to know about, so make sure you're tracking that if it's a charitable contributions, or maybe you pay your property taxes once a year by check, that sort of thing, we need to know about those so that you can continue that type of spending. This technique really relies on you being able to track and find and categorize that information, so it's probably a decent idea to just cross check this with a top down approach, so say, Well, here's what I think I spend based on my budget, based on all the things I tracked and looked at, but let's just see if that more or less adds up based on my income versus how much I put into different accounts, and are we in the ballpark? Just like with the top down approach, it's important to pay attention to any costs that might change over time.

So if you are making mortgage payments again and you're going to have that loan paid off at some point, want to look at what's the principal and interest portion of that payment, and what's the taxes and insurance portion, and keep those separated, you know that you'll continue to pay taxes and insurance, but not the principal and interest at some point down the road. Again, there are pros and cons to this, just like everything else, it's probably a decent way to go if you are very close to retirement because you're going to be spending in a similar way next year or two years from now, as you are today, so your current budget might be a nice reflection of what the next couple of years budget could look like, one of the drawbacks though, is that this can give you a false sense of precision, so you've got your list and your spreadsheet and you've got you exactly how much you paid for a bagel eight months ago, and you know exactly where your money is going, but you might be missing something, that's really the main risk is that you could be missing some important expenses, so that if you base your spending off of your spreadsheet or your list, it might not be nearly as accurate as you think it is.

So I hope you found that helpful. If you did, please leave a quick thumbs up. Thank you and take care..

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Is a Retirement Bucket Strategy Right for You?

Making your money last in retirement can be tricky, so it's worth asking if a bucketing strategy might help you address some of the biggest challenges you face. So in particular, we're talking about number one having the confidence to stop working and start spending. That can be terrifying even for those of you who are well prepared. You might have assets and a healthy income from social security and pensions, but still it's kind of terrifying to walk away from a job with a steady income and some nice health care.

You might also need to invest at least some portion of your assets for long term growth, and that's because we all face the risk of inflation or rising prices over time. So if your assets aren't growing then you may lose purchasing power over decades in retirement, and that can be a problem. Then a third issue is of course that sequence of returns risk, and this is when you are selling assets especially at the beginning of your retirement when markets are down, if there happens to be a crash at the beginning of your retirement years, if you're selling assets during that event it can really take a bigger bite out of your portfolio and increase the risk of you running out of money later in life, and we don't want that. So let's spend the next couple of minutes talking about retirement bucket strategies.

We'll go over some examples, maybe look at how to start it and manage it over time, and then discuss if it's the right move for you. I will mention that I don't see a lot of clients using this beyond a two bucket approach, but it's still nice to know these concepts so that you can either rule it out if you're not going to use it or get some good ideas. Bucketing is also known as time segmentation. In other words, you have different buckets of assets that you can pull from over different time frames, and the promise of this is that hopefully you would be able to avoid selling assets when they're down and you can be confident that you have the funds you need for your withdrawals and your spending.

So you always have a cash bucket and this involves money that you might be spending next week or next month. This is relatively safe money, and then beyond that you might have one or more additional buckets that are invested a bit differently, and we'll talk about that in just a minute. It's important for you to know that you can customize this in any way you want. We're just going to go over some examples that are concepts, but whether you use two buckets or three buckets or make the time frames different, maybe you want four years worth of cash for example, these are all things that you can customize to suit your preferences. One of the simplest approaches is a two bucket strategy.

So you've got just that one bucket for several years worth of spending. You might set aside enough cash to satisfy let's say one to three years worth of withdrawals if you needed to take money out of investments and you didn't want to sell investments because they're down perhaps. The second bucket is maybe a total return portfolio. It might be invested according to whatever is right for your risk preferences, your needs, and your tolerance, and you would know that given that you have some cash set aside you don't need to dip into that bucket for at least four years or so. Now keep in mind that this isn't rigid so you don't need to necessarily start by spending from your cash bucket. If the markets are doing well and your investments are gaining value it might make sense just to spend from those investments and leave that cash bucket as is and it's there for if you ever need it. So if there is ever a market crash it is already loaded with cash that you can draw on and you can worry a lot less about what the markets are doing.

So you can see some of the investments in bucket number one. These are cash equivalents basically it might even be in a savings account or CDs. You could look at T bills if you wanted and other types of things. Again this is up to you but the point is you might feel really confident if you have this money set aside. And by the way it's probably a good idea to start building up this cash bucket a few years before retirement so that once you reach day one of retirement you have this money set aside already.

In the second bucket of course you have a diversified portfolio so that might be mutual funds and ETFs, maybe some individual stocks and bonds, whatever it is that you invest in according to whatever is appropriate for you as an investor. So if that's a 60 40 for example you do that maybe you have more risk or less risk or alternatives or something else. We'll look at some deeper examples next but first I want to mention I'm Justin Pritchard and I help people plan for retirement and invest for the future, and in the description below you're going to find more information on bucketing, some resources from Christine Benz, as well as just some general retirement planning resources and information.

I think you will find all of that really helpful so please check that out. And by the way it's just a friendly reminder that this is just a short video it can't possibly cover everything. You can still run out of money even if you use a bucketing strategy so triple check all of this with some professionals and be aware that there is always some risk and uncertainty in the retirement planning world. Now moving on to a three bucket example we have those same two buckets as before but we've added an income bucket so this is in between the cash withdrawal bucket and the longer term growth bucket. You might prefer to set aside an extra bucket. I'm not sure that you necessarily need this bucket but you could include things that kick off higher levels of income perhaps longer term bonds and CDs maybe some dividend stocks if you have the appetite for that kind of risk and anything else that comes to mind that might help create some income that can go into bucket number one.

If we look at this three bucket example depending on how you set it up you might have roughly or almost 10 years worth of withdrawals in relatively safe assets. You've got a couple of years in cash so that's going to be really safe and then the income is a little bit more risk but not quite everything in the stock market like your growth bucket you could potentially pull from those assets for up to 10 years before you need to go and sell from your growth bucket and of course the past doesn't necessarily repeat, there are no guarantees but if we look historically there's a decent chance that you wouldn't be selling at least at steep losses and you might not be selling at any losses if you have a diversified portfolio over a rolling 10 year period, again can't predict the future, then if you really wanted to you could add more buckets but that really gets complicated, and speaking of complicated, let's get into bucket maintenance or bucket management.

This is really where you start to see some cracks in getting too complicated with this strategy or using too many buckets it's easy enough to design a bucket strategy in theory so you can set up the amounts you want and figure out how many years they should last and on your retirement date and in the early months you will have a lovely set of buckets, you've got the exact amount in each one and the investment mix in each one is exactly what you want, but at some point, life might happen, if you get into an extended downturn or even a flat market or if you have huge expenses that you didn't expect at some point we need to figure out how exactly you're going to be moving assets from one bucket to the next again when things are going well you're typically going to maybe just sell from those investment assets and not even use bucket number one the safe money you might just take profits off the top of whatever your growth investments are doing during the good times and meanwhile you might be sending income let's say dividends or capital gains payments over from the income and growth buckets into bucket number one and that can help to build that up or replenish it from any withdrawals that you might have taken but if you really start drawing from bucket one that safe bucket how exactly do we decide when and how to put money back in well one way is to use a systematic approach and that might be one example is going to be just every time period whether it's every six months every year you take some money out of the subsequent buckets and pull it forward into your cash bucket that can kind of defeat the purpose of bucketing because the idea is that you don't want to do things systematically you want to be more opportunistic and not just sell every six months but you want to avoid selling when investments are down to make a slight improvement on that you could look at a rebalancing strategy so you just take profits off the top of whatever did well and sell those assets and put the proceeds into bucket number one so if stocks did really well you're taking money out of stocks putting it into cash if bonds did really well and stocks suffered you would sell some bonds to get back into balance and then move that money over into the cash bucket you could also look at more opportunistic approaches and these border on market timing but you might say that maybe you have some rules you could say if something rises by more than five percent during a quarter or during a month for example you're going to sell some of that get it back down to a smaller proportion and take the sales proceeds put that into cash your bucket maintenance gets really complicated at some point especially if the markets don't behave so I would say you want to do a lot more thinking ahead and a lot more research if this is something you're considering look at some of the discussions with Christine Benz from Morningstar there are a number of those here on YouTube and she talks about that in more detail and proposes maybe some simplified ways of going about this which might take us right back to the two bucket approach really quickly how do you set this up in the first place well one way to do it is to use different accounts so your cash bucket is in cash and that might be in savings accounts CDs banks credit unions or even a conservative brokerage account then you might have your other buckets in different accounts and that way you can keep a balance of whatever the assets are in that account you can rebalance that account and the cash bucket is unaffected so it might make sense to do that but if you prefer you could do all of this in one account so for example you could have a couple of years worth of withdrawals sitting in cash or in a money market fund in a brokerage account then the subsequent money or the rest of the buckets would be in other investments inside of that same account ultimately this comes down to your preferences and what's going to be easiest for you to keep track of because that's really important you have to manage this over time it isn't just setting it up once and then letting it run you really do need to keep paying attention to it so I've hinted at some of the potential challenges here and I'm going to propose what I think is a simpler way of doing that and explain exactly why I think that but again it can be hard to manage this over time you don't always know what the next step is and so you might be kind of figuring things out and winging it as you go and that kind of defeats the purpose of setting up a structured process at the beginning if you aren't really sure what you're going to do with it as the years pass this can also be a cash heavy approach so you might have several years worth of withdrawals sitting in cash and that's not necessarily a bad idea but for some people given how everything is set up that can potentially mean that they don't have much that is invested for longer term growth so you want to think about that as you explore all of this and of course there are no guarantees so there could be extended draw downs that cause you to wipe out one bucket then the next and then get right into those growth assets selling exactly when you don't want to sell you can still have problems with this approach so what are some decent alternatives to bucketing you're obviously looking for a solution that can provide some peace of mind and give you a reasonable path forward as you figure out how to spend down the assets that you have one solution might be total return investing and that's where you just have a diversified portfolio that is tailored to your needs it has the right risk level and then a cash reserve so basically we're just talking about two buckets here if you want to look at it that way you've got a couple of years let's say worth of money in cash that can satisfy withdrawals during market downturns and the rest of it is invested I think you'll find that this functions similarly to what everybody thinks about as a bucket strategy so what you're doing with that approach is you want to keep the portfolio in balance so a couple of options number one is you can just sell what's been doing well and generate cash that's kind of like what we were talking about with bucketing or you might keep the portfolio in balance every six months for example or when it gets out of different tolerance ranges you might get it back into balance but effectively you're still selling your winners there and then putting it into the portfolio balance and then whenever you want to add cash you would just sell everything proportionally but you have been previously selling your winners to keep the portfolio in balance it's not exactly the same as a three bucket strategy for example but it can function somewhat similarly and another approach is to look at guardrails this is different than bucketing and looking at what to sell and when but it might be a different way to figure out exactly how much you can spend and avoid running out of money during retirement that's a topic for another video but it's something to look into if you're exploring these ideas so I hope you found this helpful if you did please leave a quick thumbs up thank you and take care.

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The 4% Rule for Retirement (FIRE)

If you have spent any time researching retirement planning online, you have heard of the 4% rule. If you haven’t heard of it, the 4% rule suggests that if you spend 4% of your assets in your initial year of retirement, and then adjust for inflation each year going forward, you will be unlikely to run out of money. To put some numbers to it, if you wanted to retire and spend $40,000 per year, adjusted for inflation, from your portfolio, you would need to retire with one million dollars to adhere to the four percent rule. This rule is alternatively described as the requirement to have 25 years worth of spending in your portfolio to afford retirement. 1/25 equals 4% – it’s the same rule. While it is simple and elegant, the 4% rule is probably not the best way to plan for retirement, especially if you plan on retiring early. I’m Ben Felix, Associate Portfolio Manager at PWL Capital. In this episode of Common Sense Investing, I’m going to tell you why the 4% rule is not a rule to live by.

The 4% rule originated in William Bengen’s October 1994 study, published in the Journal of Financial Planning. Bengen was a financial planner. He wanted to find a realistic safe withdrawal rate to recommend to his retired clients. Bengan’s breakthrough in determining a safe withdrawal rate came from modelling spending over 30-year periods in US market history rather than the common practice of simply using average historical returns. Using data for a hypothetical portfolio consisting of 50% S&P 500 index and 50% intermediate-term US government bonds he looked at rolling 30-year periods starting in 1926, ending with 1992. So, 1926 – 1955, followed by 1927 – 1956 etc., ending with 1963 – 1992. The maximum safe withdrawal rate in the worst 30-year period ended up being just over 4%. From this simple but innovative analysis, the 4% rule was born. More recently Bengen has adjusted his spending rule to 4.5% based on the inclusion of small cap stocks in the hypothetical historical portfolio.

While the 4% (and the 4.5% rule) may have basis in historical US data, there are substantial problems with these rules in general, and specifically in the case of a retirement period longer than 30 years. In his 2017 book How Much Can I Spend in Retirement, Wade Pfau, Ph.D, CFA, looked at 30-year safe withdrawal rates in both US and non-US markets using the Dimson-Marsh-Staunton Global Returns Dataset, and assuming a portfolio of 50% stocks and 50% bills. He found that the US at 3.9%, Canada at 4.0%, New Zealand at 3.8%, and Denmark at 3.7% were the only countries in the dataset that would have historically supported something close to the 4% rule. The aggregate global portfolio of stocks and bills had a much lower 30-year safe withdrawal rate of 3.5%. Considering returns other that US historical returns is important, but, in my opinion, one of the most important assumptions to be aware of in the 4% rule is the 30-year retirement period used by Bengen. People are living longer, and many of the bloggers citing the 4% rule are focused on FIRE, financial independence retire early.

In Bengen’s study the 4% rule with a 50% stock 50% bond portfolio was shown to have a 0% chance of failure over 30-year historical periods in the US. That chance of failure increases to around 15% over 40-year periods, and closer to 30% over 50-year periods. FIRE likely means a retirement period longer than 30 years. Modelling longer time periods using historical sampling becomes problematic because we have data for a limited number of historical 50-year periods.

One way to address this issue is with Monte Carlo simulation. Monte Carlo is a technique where an unlimited number of sample data sets can be simulated to model uncertainty without relying on historical periods. Even with Monte Carlo simulation, there is an obvious risk to using historical data to build expectations about the future. The world today is different than it was in the past. Interest rates are low, and stock prices are high. While it may be reasonable to expect relative outcomes to persist, such as stocks outperforming bonds, small stocks outperforming large stocks, and value stocks outperforming growth stocks, the magnitude of future returns are unknown and unknowable. To address this for financial planning, PWL Capital uses a combination of equilibrium cost of capital and current market conditions to build an estimate for expected future returns for use in financial planning. This process is outlined in the 2016 paper Great Expectations.

Using the December 2017 PWL Capital expected returns for a 50% stock 50% bond portfolio we are able to model the safe withdrawal rate for varying durations of retirement using Monte Carlo simulation. We will assume that a 95% success rate over 1,000 trials is sufficient to be called a safe withdrawal rate. For a 30-year retirement period, our Monte Carlo simulation gives us a 3.5% safe withdrawal rate. Pretty close to the original 4% rule, and spot on with Wade Pfau’s global revision of Bengen’s analysis. Now let’s say a 40-year old wants to retire today and assume life until age 95. That’s a 55-year retirement period. The safe withdrawal rate? 2.2%. I think that this is such an important message. The 4% rule falls apart over longer retirement periods. So far we have talked about spending a consistent inflation adjusted amount each year in retirement. One way to increase the amount that you can spend overall is allowing for variable spending. In general this means spending more when markets are good, and spending less when markets are bad. The result is more spending overall with a lower probability of running out of money. The catch is that you have to live with a variable income or have the ability to generate additional income from, say, working, to fill in the gaps when markets are not doing well.

We also need to talk about fees. Fees reduce returns. Fees may be negligible if you are using low-cost ETFs, but they become extremely important if you are using high-fee mutual funds, or if you are paying for financial advice. The safe withdrawal rate in the worst 30-year period in the US drops to 3.56% with a 1% fee, making the 4% rule the more like the 3.5% rule after a 1% fee.

Adding a 1% fee to the Monte Carlo simulation reduces the safe withdrawal rates by around 0.50% on average. In both cases this is a meaningful reduction in spending. Of course, fees need to be considered alongside the value being received in exchange for the fee. This value should be heavily tied to behavioural coaching and financial decision making. There have been two well-known attempts to quantify the value of financial advice, one by Vanguard and one by Morningstar. Vanguard estimated that between building a customized investment plan, minimizing risks and tax impacts, and behavioural coaching, good financial advice can add an average of 3% per year to returns. Morningstar looked at withdrawal strategies, asset allocation, tax efficiency, liability relative optimization, annuity allocation, and timing of social security (CPP in Canada), to arrive at a value-add of 2.34% per year.

PWL Capital’s Raymond Kerzerho has also written on this topic, finding an estimated value-add of just over 3% per year. Based on these analyses, one could argue that paying 1% for good financial advice could even increase your safe withdrawal rate. I would not go that far, but the point is that while fees are a consideration, they may be worthwhile in exchange for good advice.

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Is a Retirement Bucket Strategy Right for You?

Making your cash last in retirement can be difficult, so it'' s worth asking if a bucketing approach could aid you deal with some of the biggest difficulties you encounter. In specific, we'' re chatting regarding number one having the confidence to stop functioning and also begin costs. That can be terrifying even for those of you who are well prepared. You could have assets and also a healthy income from social security and pension plans, yet still it'' s type of terrifying to ignore a task with a stable income and also some nice healthcare. You may likewise need to spend at least some section of your assets for long term growth, which'' s because all of us encounter the danger of rising cost of living or increasing prices gradually. If your assets aren'' t expanding after that you might shed buying power over years in retirement, and that can be an issue. Then a third concern is naturally that sequence of returns risk, and also this is when you are offering possessions especially at the start of your retirement when markets are down, if there happens to be a collision at the start of your retirement years, if you'' re selling possessions during that occasion it can truly take a bigger bite out of your profile and increase the risk of you running out of money later on in life, and also we put on'' t desire that.So let'' s spend the next couple of minutes speaking about retirement container techniques. We'' ll discuss some instances, perhaps look at just how to begin it and also handle it in time, and afterwards go over if it'' s the appropriate action for you. I will certainly discuss that I don'' t see a great deal of clients using this past a two bucket strategy, yet it'' s still nice to recognize these ideas to ensure that you can either rule it out if you'' re not mosting likely to utilize it or get some good ideas.Bucketing is also

called time division. To put it simply, you have different pails of possessions that you can draw from over different time structures, as well as the guarantee of this is that ideally you would certainly be able to avoid offering possessions when they ' re down as well as you can be confident that you have the funds you require for your withdrawals and your spending. You constantly have a cash money container and also this entails cash that you could be spending following week or next month. This is relatively secure money, and then past that you could have one or more extra buckets that are spent a bit in a different way, as well as we ' ll discuss that in just a min. It ' s crucial for you to recognize that you can customize this by any means you want.We ' re simply going to discuss some examples that are ideas,

but whether you use 2 pails or 3 buckets or make the moment frameworks different, maybe you want 4 years worth of cash as an example, these are all points that you can customize to match your preferences. Among the easiest techniques is a 2 pail technique. So you ' ve obtained simply that pail for numerous years worth of spending. You may allot adequate cash money to please let ' s say one to three years worth of withdrawals if you needed to take money out of investments and you didn ' t desire to sell financial investments since they ' re down perhaps.The 2nd bucket is possibly a total return profile. It may be spent according to whatever is right for your threat choices, your requirements, as well as your resistance, and you would certainly understand that considered that you have some money allot you wear ' t requirement to dip into that container for at the very least four years approximately. Currently maintain in mind that this isn ' t rigid so you put on ' t demand to necessarily start by spending from your cash money bucket. If the markets are succeeding as well as your financial investments are gaining'value it could make good sense simply to spend from those financial investments and leave that cash bucket as is and it ' s there for if you ever need it. If there is ever before a market collision it is already filled with cash that you can draw on as well as you can fret a great deal much less concerning what the markets are doing. So you can see some of the financial investments in pail leading. These are cash matchings essentially it may even remain in a savings account or CDs. You could take a look at T bills if you desired and other kinds of things.Again this is up to you yet the point is you may feel actually confident if you have this cash set apart. And also incidentally it ' s probably an excellent suggestion to begin accumulating this cash money bucket a couple of years before retired life so that when you reach day one of retirement you have this cash alloted already. In the 2nd container certainly you have a diversified profile to make sure that could be common funds and also ETFs, possibly some specific supplies as well as bonds, whatever it is that you spend in according to whatever is appropriate for you as a financier. If that ' s a 60 40 for instance you do that possibly you have even more threat or much less risk or alternatives or something else.We ' ll appearance at some deeper instances next but first I desire to discuss I ' m Justin Pritchard and also I aid people plan for retirement as well as invest for the future, and also in the description below you ' re going to locate even more details on bucketing, some

resources from Christine Benz, as well as simply some basic retirement preparation resources as well as info. I assume you will certainly discover every one of that truly practical so please check that out. And by the way it ' s just a friendly tip that this is simply a short video it can ' t possibly cover every little thing. You can still lack money also if you utilize a bucketing method so triple check every one of this with some professionals and be conscious that there is always some threat as well as uncertainty in the retirement planning world. Now carrying on to a'three bucket instance we have those very same two buckets as before yet we ' ve added an income bucket so this remains in between the cash withdrawal bucket and also the longer term growth container. You might favor to reserve an added bucket. I ' m uncertain that you necessarily require this bucket but you might consist of points that kick off higher degrees of revenue possibly longer term bonds and CDs perhaps some dividend supplies if you have the appetite for that sort of risk and also anything else that enters your mind that may help develop some income that can enter into bucket number one.If we check out this three pail example relying on exactly how you establish it up you could have about or virtually 10 years worth of withdrawals in fairly safe assets. You ' ve obtained a couple of years in cash money to ensure that ' s mosting likely to be really secure and afterwards the earnings is a little more danger but not rather everything in the stock exchange like your development bucket you might possibly pull from those properties for as much as one decade prior to you require to go and also offer from your development pail and also naturally the past doesn ' t always repeat, there are no assurances however if we look historically there ' s a good chance that you wouldn ' t be selling at least at steep losses and also you might not be costing any kind of losses if you have a diversified profile over a moving ten years period, once more can ' t anticipate the future, then if you truly wished to you could add even more buckets yet that actually gets complicated, and talking of complex, let'' s get involved in container upkeep or bucket management.This is actually where you start to see some cracks in obtaining also made complex with this method or utilizing also numerous pails it ' s easy enough to make a container method theoretically so you can set up the amounts you desire and figure out the amount of years they need to last as well as on your retirement date as well as in the very early months you will have a wonderful set of containers, you ' ve got the exact amount

in every one and the financial investment mix in every one is specifically what you want, however eventually, life may take place, if you enter a prolonged'slump and even a flat market or if you have substantial costs that you didn ' t expect at some factor we need to figure out just how exactly you ' re going to be moving properties from one bucket to the following again when points are working out you ' re usually mosting likely to perhaps just market from those investment assets and also not also use container primary the secure money you may just take revenues off the top of whatever your growth investments are doing during the great times and also at the same time you may be sending out revenue let ' s claim returns or funding gains payments over from the revenue and also growth buckets into pail top which can help to develop that up or renew it from any withdrawals that you might have taken yet if you actually begin drawing from pail one that safe pail just how exactly do we make a decision when as well as just how to place cash back in well one means is to make use of a methodical approach and also that could be one instance is mosting likely to be just every time duration whether it ' s every six months yearly you take some money out of the subsequent containers and also draw it onward right into your money bucket that can kind of loss the function of bucketing due to the fact that the idea is that you don ' t wish to do things methodically you intend to be much more opportunistic as well as not simply sell every six months yet you wish to prevent marketing when financial investments are down to make a slight renovation on that particular you can look at a rebalancing method so you simply take revenues off the top of whatever did well as well as sell those possessions as well as placed the proceeds into pail number one so if stocks did actually well you ' re taking money out of stocks placing it into cash if bonds did really well as well as stocks endured you would offer some bonds to return into balance and after that relocate that cash over right into the money container you could also consider even more opportunistic methods and also these approach market timing yet you may claim that maybe you have some policies you could say if something surges by greater than five percent throughout a quarter or throughout a month for example you ' re mosting likely to offer some of that obtain it back down to a smaller percentage and also take the sales earnings placed that right into cash money your bucket maintenance obtains truly complicated eventually particularly if the markets wear ' t act so I would claim you desire to do a lot more thinking in advance and also a whole lot even more study if this is something you ' re taking into consideration consider a few of the discussions with Christine Benz from Morningstar there are a variety of those right here on YouTube and she talks about that in even more detail as well as suggests maybe some simplified methods of tackling this which may take us right back to the two container strategy really quickly how do you set this up in the very first place well one means to do it is to utilize different accounts so your cash pail remains in cash money which may be in cost savings accounts CDs financial institutions cooperative credit union and even a conservative brokerage account then you could have your various other pails in different accounts which way you can keep an equilibrium of whatever the assets remain in that account you can rebalance that account and the cash money pail is untouched so it could make good sense to do that however if you favor you could do all of this in one account so for instance you could have a pair of years worth of withdrawals sitting in cash or in a money market fund in a brokerage account after that the subsequent money or the remainder of the pails would certainly remain in other financial investments within that same account ultimately this boils down to your choices as well as what ' s mosting likely to be most convenient for you to track because that ' s truly vital you need to manage this gradually it isn ' t simply establishing it up when and after that allowing it run you truly do require to keep focusing on it so I ' ve meant some of the potential obstacles here and I ' m mosting likely to suggest what I assume is an easier method of doing that and also explain exactly why I assume that yet once again it can be hard to manage this gradually you wear ' t always know what the next action is therefore you could be sort of figuring things out and winging it as you go and that kind of defeats the function of establishing an organized procedure at the beginning if you aren ' t'actually certain what you ' re going to finish with it as the years pass this can additionally be a cash heavy method so you might have several years worth of withdrawals being in cash which ' s not necessarily a negative suggestion however, for some people provided exactly how whatever is established that can potentially imply that they put on ' t have a lot that is invested for longer term growth so you wish to assume concerning that as you explore all of this as well as certainly there are no assurances so there could be extended draw downs that cause you to eliminate one pail after that the following and afterwards solve into those growth properties offering specifically when you don ' t intend to offer you can still have problems with this technique so what are some good alternatives to bucketing you ' re certainly searching for an option that can give some assurance and provide you a practical path forward as you find out just how to spend down the possessions that you have one remedy may be complete return investing which ' s where you simply have a varied portfolio that is customized to your needs it has the best danger degree and after that a cash money book so basically we ' re simply speaking about two pails here if you wish to take a look at it that way you ' ve obtained a number of years allow ' s state worth of cash in money that can please withdrawals during market recessions and the rest of it is invested I believe you ' ll find that this features likewise to what everyone considers as a pail technique so what you ' re performing with that approach is you wish to keep the profile in balance so a couple of choices number one is you can just offer what ' s been succeeding and create cash that'' s kind of like what we were speaking about with bucketing or you might maintain the profile in balance every six months for instance or when it obtains'out of various resistance varies you may get it back right into equilibrium yet properly you ' re still offering your champions there and after that putting it right into the portfolio equilibrium and after that whenever you intend to include money you'would simply offer everything proportionally however you have actually been previously marketing your champions to keep the profile in equilibrium it ' s not exactly the exact same as a 3 container method for example but it can function rather similarly and also another method is to take a look at guardrails this is different than bucketing as well as taking a look at what to sell as well as when but it may be a different way to identify specifically just how much you can spend and stay clear of lacking cash throughout retired life that ' s a subject for one more video clip but'it ' s something to explore if you ' re exploring these suggestions so I wish you located this practical if you did please leave a fast thumbs up thank you and also take treatment.

You could establish aside sufficient cash to satisfy allow ' s state one to 3 years worth of withdrawals if you needed to take cash out of investments and you didn ' t want to market financial investments due to the fact that they ' re down perhaps.The second container is perhaps a total return profile. It may be spent according to whatever is ideal for your danger choices, your demands, and also your resistance, as well as you would know that given that you have some cash money set aside you don ' t need to dip right into that bucket for at the very least four years or so. Currently maintain in mind that this isn ' t inflexible so you put on ' t need to necessarily start by investing from your money bucket. And by the means it ' s simply a friendly reminder that this is just a brief video clip it can ' t potentially cover whatever. You ' ve got a couple of years in cash money so that ' s going to be really risk-free as well as after that the income is a little bit more danger but not quite every little thing in the supply market like your development pail you can potentially draw from those properties for up to 10 years before you need to go and sell from your growth bucket as well as of program the previous doesn ' t necessarily repeat, there are no guarantees however if we look traditionally there ' s a suitable opportunity that you wouldn ' t be offering at least at steep losses and also you might not be selling at any losses if you have a varied profile over a moving 10 year duration, once more can ' t anticipate the future, after that if you actually desired to you can include even more buckets yet that truly obtains difficult, and talking of challenging, let'' s obtain right into container upkeep or bucket management.This is really where you begin to see some fractures in getting also complicated with this strategy or utilizing too many containers it ' s very easy sufficient to develop a pail technique in concept so you can set up the quantities you want and figure out just how many years they ought to last and also on your retired life day and also in the early months you will certainly have a charming collection of pails, you ' ve obtained the exact quantity

in each one and also the investment mix in each one is exactly what you desire, yet at some factor, life might occur, if you obtain right into an extensive'recession or even a flat market or if you have huge costs that you didn ' t anticipate at some point we need to figure out how specifically you ' re going to be moving possessions from one bucket to the following once more when points are going well you ' re generally going to maybe just offer from those investment properties as well as not even use pail number one the safe money you may just take profits off the top of whatever your development investments are doing throughout the excellent times and also meanwhile you might be sending income allowed ' s claim dividends or funding gains payments over from the earnings and also growth buckets right into bucket number one and also that can assist to develop that up or replenish it from any kind of withdrawals that you could have taken yet if you actually begin attracting from bucket one that risk-free bucket how specifically do we choose when and also exactly how to place cash back in well one means is to make use of an organized method and also that might be one example is going to be simply every time period whether it ' s every six months every year you take some cash out of the subsequent buckets and also draw it ahead right into your money bucket that can kind of loss the purpose of bucketing because the suggestion is that you wear ' t desire to do points methodically you want to be extra opportunistic and also not simply offer every six months but you want to avoid selling when financial investments are down to make a small renovation on that you might look at a rebalancing technique so you simply take earnings off the top of whatever did well and also sell those assets and placed the earnings into bucket number one so if supplies did really well you ' re taking money out of supplies putting it into cash if bonds did truly well and stocks endured you would certainly sell some bonds to obtain back right into balance as well as after that move that money over right into the money bucket you can likewise look at even more opportunistic approaches and these border on market timing however you may state that possibly you have some policies you might claim if something rises by more than 5 percent during a quarter or during a month for example you ' re going to market some of that get it back down to a smaller sized percentage and also take the sales profits put that right into cash your container upkeep gets really made complex at some point particularly if the markets wear ' t behave so I would certainly claim you desire to do a great deal more believing in advance and also a great deal more study if this is something you ' re taking into consideration look at some of the conversations with Christine Benz from Morningstar there are a number of those right here on YouTube and she chats about that in more detail and proposes maybe some simplified means of going about this which might take us right back to the 2 container strategy truly promptly just how do you set this up in the initial area well one means to do it is to utilize different accounts so your money pail is in money as well as that might be in financial savings accounts CDs financial institutions credit rating unions or also a conservative broker agent account after that you may have your various other buckets in different accounts as well as that means you can keep an equilibrium of whatever the assets are in that account you can rebalance that account as well as the cash money bucket is unaffected so it could make sense to do that but if you prefer you might do all of this in one account so for instance you could have a couple of years worth of withdrawals resting in cash or in a cash market fund in a broker agent account after that the succeeding cash or the remainder of the buckets would certainly be in various other investments inside of that very same account ultimately this comes down to your preferences as well as what ' s going to be simplest for you to keep track of because that ' s really vital you have to manage this over time it isn ' t simply setting it up as soon as and also after that allowing it run you truly do need to maintain paying interest to it so I ' ve hinted at some of the possible difficulties below as well as I ' m going to propose what I think is a simpler method of doing that and also explain exactly why I assume that but once more it can be tough to manage this over time you put on ' t constantly understand what the next action is and also so you might be kind of figuring points out as well as winging it as you go as well as that kind of defeats the function of establishing up a structured procedure at the beginning if you aren ' t'really sure what you ' re going to do with it as the years pass this can additionally be a money heavy strategy so you may have numerous years worth of withdrawals sitting in cash and that ' s not necessarily a negative suggestion but for some people offered exactly how whatever is set up that can possibly suggest that they put on ' t have a lot that is invested for longer term growth so you desire to believe regarding that as you check out all of this and also of course there are no assurances so there might be expanded draw downs that trigger you to clean out one pail after that the following as well as then obtain right into those development possessions marketing exactly when you don ' t desire to sell you can still have problems with this strategy so what are some good alternatives to bucketing you ' re certainly looking for a solution that can give some tranquility of mind and provide you a sensible course forward as you figure out exactly how to invest down the properties that you have one option could be overall return investing as well as that ' s where you simply have a varied portfolio that is customized to your requirements it has the best danger level and then a money book so primarily we ' re simply talking about 2 pails right here if you want to look at it that way you ' ve got a pair of years let ' s say worth of cash in cash money that can satisfy withdrawals during market recessions as well as the remainder of it is spent I think you ' ll find that this features similarly to what everyone assumes about as a pail strategy so what you ' re doing with that strategy is you want to maintain the profile in equilibrium so a pair of options number one is you can simply offer what ' s been doing well and create money that'' s kind of like what we were speaking about with bucketing or you could keep the profile in balance every six months for example or when it obtains'out of different resistance ranges you could obtain it back right into balance however efficiently you ' re still marketing your champions there and after that placing it into the profile balance and also then whenever you want to add cash money you'would certainly simply offer every little thing proportionally however you have actually been formerly marketing your winners to keep the portfolio in equilibrium it ' s not precisely the very same as a 3 bucket method for instance however it can operate somewhat in a similar way and an additional technique is to look at guardrails this is various than bucketing as well as looking at what to sell as well as when but it might be a various method to figure out specifically just how much you can invest and also prevent running out of money during retired life that ' s a topic for another video clip yet'it ' s something to look right into if you ' re exploring these concepts so I wish you discovered this useful if you did please leave a quick thumbs up thank you and also take care.

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10 Proven Life Hacks for a Happier and More Fulfilling Retirement

[Songs] Retired life is a totally various stage of.
one'' s life, a phase, otherwise well prepared for, could result in a life of remorse as well as problem. While there is no universal formula on just how to retire well, there specify techniques.
that can assist you retire well. this video aims to run you via everything you.
need to learn about how to enjoy your gold years. Below’s something to contemplate: Have you.
ever asked yourself why some people retire well while others drift into the.
most bitter part of their lives? What is the trick to retiring well, and what.
did these individuals do in different ways to retire well? Is it about having a budget and purely maintaining to it? Or has to do with saving a significant.
percent of your incomes early? Or, did they get their by spending.
some component of their wealth wisely? These and a lot more comparable ideas run across.
my mind whenever I see folks that have been able to retire well, care for their tax obligations and.
get over all the challenges connected with retirement.After a great deal of research and. a great deal coffee exploring the topic, below’s what I figured out. If you desire to. reproduce their success, retire well, with
a considerable savings. Here’s. somethings you ought to maintain an eye on. Number 10. Your way of life A typical characteristic among individuals who are. retired well, as well as are in fact appreciating their retirement is exactly how wisely they. lived while still in the labor pressure. Have you ever listened to the stating” you can not. eat your cake as well as have it too”? Well, what this means in this context is that.
Living within or below your ways does not.
yourself; you can still be pleased as well as happy while stopping on your own from investing in. costly or luxurious items.This way, you can have something considerable from your earnings.
Strategy early Chatting concerning your retired life strategy while still in. As soon as you retire, you may not be able
to. You might often remain still throughout the

day when you ' re retired.
company to see if you can obtain some job lowered. By minimizing the amount of job you perform in a. day, as well as replacing it with activities you ‘re likely to do as soon as you retire, you will.
Number 7. Prepare on your own psychologically for retirement Even if you desire to, you can not take place working. permanently. At some time in your life, your body may not have the ability to take the stress and anxiety and also stress. associated with work. Retired life from work is, as a result a stable truth. The earlier. you prepare yourself mentally as well as permit that to

sink in, the much more
likely. you’ll enjoy your retired life years. Do not push the thought of retired life aside. Instead, involve yourself proactively about
how to take advantage of your retirement. Ask on your own. what you would finish with all the downtime.
Exist any kind of dream delegated be chased? Any type of ability. you ' re still interested in acquiring, such as discovering exactly how to play a brand-new instrument? Any one of this. might offer as a good usage of your retired life time.
The most essential point is not to remain lonely or still. Being less active will likely lead. to monotony, and also eventually clinical depression. Number 6. Keep friends outside. of your job associates When you retire, you will certainly require the company. of friends from time to time.Hanging out with friends, spending quality time together doing what. you all love, or chatting about subjects such as sporting activities or the excellent old days would certainly keep.
you in a light state of mind throughout the week. Number 5. Way of living modifications Retired life offers you the possibility to. make some vital modifications in your life, such as the top quality of food you eat. If you rarely had a well-cooked dish, prior to you retired. Currently, with even more time on your.
hands, you can ultimately change from

the undesirable eating pattern and also transform a brand-new leaf hereof. Food plays a substantial function in our health; you are what you consume. You can currently buy.
healthy and balanced meals or also get groceries and also prepare the best healthier meal on your own. And if you. can’t prepare, you have actually got regularly to discover how. Workout might additionally be one of those things. you previously couldn’t do as a result of your work routine. Now that you ' re retired, absolutely nothing stops.
you from trying a number of exercise routines. Exercise is restorative, and also I would highly. recommend it to you.Develop a simple workout routine, something you can pay for to do.
You can obtain a fitness display to aid keep.
you knowledgeable about your heart condition. Keep in mind that difficult workout may not.
In that situation, it ' s best to follow your medical professional ' s. Strategy daily Preparation your day allows you to schedule a. It ' s best to have a routine down of things.
He had always desired to find out just how to dance however never had the time.
He additionally does this. You can never ever catch him.
Individuals say retired life has a. Retirement ironically brought out the finest in. This freedom is valuable, as well as suitably, your retired life could.
That stage of your life mores than, and. you can never ever go back to being young and also vibrant any type of longer. Make peace with this. and find a method to proceed. Tell on your own you did your ideal and pay focus to your.
existing instead of dwell in the past.

Retired life presents you with something you gave.
up in childhood years, which is time. Do not spend this thinking back concerning what could have been done. The past is gone as well as never ever returning, so the earlier you recognize this and go on, the. quicker you can start to enjoy your retirement.Number 2.
Invest for your retirement One of the points that reduce against retiring.
To keep your present
lifestyleWay of life Always examine your health and wellness.
You ' ll be predisposed to some ailments as well as wellness problems as you age. This makes it required that you'occasionally go for a total clinical exam. This could. help you prevent or discover and treat'diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, dementia, strokes, and also other. health problems before they come to be a risk. To conclude, most of us are various, as well as as a result, nobody formula applies to. every person'concerning exactly how to retire well. However, by taking on some of the routines and. economic techniques that have actually been shown to ensure a successful retired life
, your possibilities. of retiring well can be substantially increased.Well people, thank you so a lot for watching, like and also subscribe, as well as I ‘ll. see you all in the following one.

Strategy early Talking regarding your retirement strategy while still in. Do not push the idea of retirement aside. Rather, engage on your own proactively about
how exactly how make the most many your retirementRetired life Individuals state retired life has a. Retired life paradoxically brought out the finest in.

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