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Retirement Spending: Tips and Research Findings

It's hard to predict how much you're going to 
spend in retirement, but there's some really good   information out there, and using that you can take 
a look at what previous retirees have experienced   (those who have gone down the road before you) 
and you can get some tips on what you might   expect as you go into retirement. So we will look 
at some of the traditional or the most common ways   of estimating your spending, and this is what 
you might find in a lot of popular retirement   calculators, or in the so-called four percent 
rule, which is not really a rule, but it's a   historical research finding.

Those things can 
potentially cause problems and cause you to miss   out on some enjoyment, so we want to avoid that. 
We'll also get into some actual spending data,   so what are people really doing when they spend 
in retirement? And some surveys and some other   research that can help you understand what your 
spending might look like. A traditional way of   looking at your spending is all about maintaining 
purchasing power, which is very important,   you need to keep up with rising prices and be able 
to maintain the same standard of living because   if you don't factor in inflation then that can 
erode your purchasing power and make it harder   to afford the things that you want and need, so 
most calculators are going to do a fixed increase   in your spending each year and the four percent 
rule, for example, does the same thing, it just   gives you an increase in whatever inflation was 
for that year, and that continues on indefinitely,   and for an oversimplified example we can see 
something where you just take a round number   $100,000 for example and that just increases by an 
inflation amount every year until the day you die,   but it might not necessarily make sense to use a 
spending plan that just marches on blindly every   year with inflation because the reality is you 
might experience some different spending patterns   in retirement.

One example of that is David 
Blanchett's retirement spending smile, and   this gets its name from the smile shaped spending 
curve that you might see throughout the lifespan   of a typical retiree, so if we over simplify what 
this comes from it's that retirees might, or in   his research they did tend to spend at a rate that 
was slightly less than inflation it was inflation   minus one percent so this can get quite technical 
and in the weeds but what happens is over time,   those health care costs typically increase and at 
some point the line comes back up giving you that   smile shaped chart that's an over simplification, 
of course, but if you look at maybe an alternative   to plain old lock step inflation adjustments you 
might find that that's closer to the reality for   some people, and in fact, when I adjust people's 
retirement projections using the retirement   spending smile for example that often helps to 
improve their chances of success another spending   pattern is the go-go slow-go and no-go years and 
this assumes that right after you retire you're   at your healthiest and you're very eager to do 
all of those things that you've dreamed about   doing in retirement, so you go ahead and take 
those trips and spend a lot of money on travel   and entertainment and all the other things that 
you might not have had the time to do during your   working years at some point we shift from that go 
go phase into a slow go phase and that might be   because you've done a lot of the things you want 
to do and you might be getting older and have less   energy or desire as a result your spending can 
decrease during that phase and then you go into   a no-go phase and that is where you're going to 
be a lot less active a lot less money goes towards   travel but you still have some entertainment 
and leisure but most importantly those health   care costs tend to pick up and that mirrors what 
you see with the retirement spending smile in the   no go phase you're going to spend a lot more on 
health care and a lot less on other things.

By   the way, I'm Justin Pritchard, and I help people 
plan for retirement and invest for the future. So   in the description for this video you can find 
some of the information we're talking about,   links to these articles as well as some other 
resources and calculators and tools that can   help you as you do your own retirement plan.

So, 
how much will you spend in retirement? Well there   are a couple of different ways to estimate that 
and try and arrive at the number that should be   your spending target we have a couple of them 
shown here one is an income replacement ratio   that's often something like eighty percent ninety 
percent even a hundred percent especially in the   early years of retirement or those go go years but 
it might not need to be 100 of what you're earning   during your working years and that's because 
you're no longer going to be paying payroll taxes   in retirement, you might not be saving money each 
year in retirement accounts because you're already   retired, and if you commute to work, for example, 
you no longer have those expenses that said,   you will have more time on your hands, and so the 
question becomes are you going to do things that   cost money and how does that compare to your 
pre-retirement spending I've got other videos   that talk about these techniques in more detail so 
we're just going to keep it brief on that the next   is if you look at your actual spending and there 
are a couple of ways to do this depending on   your preferences and your patience and how much 
information you have available so a bottom-up   approach is going to be where you actually track 
your spending and you look at where your money   goes so how much goes to housing how much goes to 
utilities food including the grocery store versus   dining out and any other types of food you're 
essentially going to tally up everything that   you spend money on and assume that that might 
be similar to what you spend in retirement   now there will be some changes again you might 
not commute anymore or you might even have bigger   changes like at some point the mortgage gets paid 
off or you stop supporting children or something   like that but you might assume that your spending 
is roughly the same as what you spend now although   it could make sense to add in things like vacation 
spending the challenge with a bottom-up approach   is that it's assuming that you have everything 
because it seems very detailed but you might   miss things so it can seem very precise but it 
might still be wrong and that can be problematic   a different way to do it that might catch some 
of those things that you often miss is a top-down   approach and that's going to be where you start 
with your income you know how much you're bringing   in and you subtract out any taxes and any savings 
and other things that you don't actually spend   money on and the amount that's left over is what 
you could assume is what you actually spend on   things and you don't know how much you spend 
on each thing but you know that the money goes   somewhere it didn't go to taxes or into a savings 
account so it went somewhere and again you might   assume that you'll continue to spend at a similar 
level but maybe you need to make some adjustments   again like maybe additional vacation spending it 
can also make sense to assume that that's going   to change so if you subscribe to the model of 
the go-go slow-go no-go years, those vacation   expenditures could be high in the early years of 
retirement and then maybe you want to assume that   those taper off at some point although healthcare 
spending should pick up with either technique   whether it's the top down or the bottom up you 
want to make sure that you catch all of those   infrequent expenses so those might be annual 
costs maybe you pay your property taxes each year   or maybe you buy a new vehicle periodically those 
are things that you might not catch if you just   take a snapshot of one year's spending or even 
a couple of months of spending it's easy to miss   those things so be sure to add those in as you do 
this exercise and a third technique for estimating   your spending is a lifestyle range so you might 
pick a round number a lot of people like to pick   a hundred thousand dollars for example and say 
I would be comfortable if I'm able to spend that   the challenge is it's not very close necessarily 
to what you actually spend and what seems to   happen, this isn't always the case, but what 
seems to happen is people often pick a number   that's too high so it might be more money than 
they need but it seems like a nice round number   that would be comfortable unfortunately if you 
pick too high that can be problematic because   you might need to save more each year you might 
need to work longer to make the numbers work out   and that can be problematic if you don't get to 
enjoy life as much as you would hope here's just   one example where we say somebody's currently 
earning 100 but they save some money in a 401k   they have some payroll taxes and both of those 
are going to go away once they stop working   you will still have income taxes in 
retirement the question is going to be   how much exactly but you don't necessarily need to 
spend and you probably today don't currently spend   a full 100 000 even if you currently earn 100 
000.

Now time for a friendly reminder that this   is just a short video and it can't possibly cover 
everything and it's not made with any knowledge   of what you have going on, so please do a lot 
more research, please talk with professionals,   talk with a financial planner talk, with a CPA 
and an attorney, and that way, you reduce the   chances dramatically of having any problems. 
So hit pause read that if you need more time,   and we'll move on. So where do retirees actually 
spend their money what do other people spend their   money on and we have some nice information that 
can help paint the picture that might be useful   for you might make some light bulbs go on for 
you this is some anonymized data that looks at   actual transactions in people's bank accounts so 
they can't see exactly who spent what on what but   they categorize it and in the aggregate they're 
looking at where money goes for people who are   at least partially retired so they might have some 
retirement income or they're spending from their   assets by the way this does show households with 
investable wealth of $1 to $3 million so that's   relatively wealthy most people don't have that 
much so this might not be exactly where you fall   in the world but it can at least help paint a 
picture of what it looks like for some people   in retirement what you'll notice not surprisingly 
is that those health care costs do increase over   time and it might not be as much as you think 
especially once you're on medicare the costs   can be somewhat under control especially if you 
don't have major health issues maybe you have some   supplemental or other types of coverage to help 
manage those costs and charitable giving increases   as well but things like transportation and travel 
tend to decrease as a part of your spending over   time and going back to the retirement spending 
stages you can almost see those here where the   spending starts out high in your 60s but then it 
declines and at some point it tilts back up again   and that is primarily going to be because health 
care is catching up with you by the way if you're   looking at that housing category and that seems to 
almost increase later in life it's not something   that we can necessarily know for sure but some 
people might speculate that that has to do with   maybe home modifications for those who want to age 
in place or maybe they're getting some long-term   care at home so that can contribute to this 
massive housing category and looking at data from   the BLS this might be more typical for the average 
household you can see some similar patterns here   so it's about 64 000 of spending per year 
for those age 55 to 64 maybe approaching   or just beginning retirement once they're above 
65 that decreases to about 52 000 and of course   over age 75 it's even lower interestingly 
on this one you do see some decreasing   transportation costs but you don't necessarily see 
quite as much of a tick up in the healthcare costs   in the consumer expenditures survey so that showed 
us how much people actually spend whether they are   among the more wealthy or if they're typical 
households so let's get into some logistics so   after a lifetime of savings it may be foreign 
to you to stop putting money into accounts and   start taking money back out so how exactly do 
you do that again we're going to cover a lot of   ground in this video but this will be just a brief 
treatment of the topic spending from your assets   is relatively easy typically you just need to sell 
something that you have if you have it invested   convert it to cash and then take the cash 
out that's often something you can automate   or you can have somebody handle for you 
but if you use mutual funds for example   it's really logistically quite easy to do a 
lot of people will take assets from a workplace   retirement plan like a 401k 403 b and move 
that into an IRA that you control and there are   generally no tax consequences as long as you make 
the transfer properly and don't necessarily take   possession of the money from there you have a lot 
more distribution options you can typically just   link your bank account and maybe you can go online 
or call somebody up and have the funds zapped over   to your bank account within just a couple of 
days and that can recreate or you can automate   and you can recreate what feels like a monthly 
paycheck you always have to be mindful of taxes so   definitely speak with a CPA or a professional as 
you set all of that up and start making decisions   because you don't want to get any tax penalties or 
pay any unnecessary taxes so you're going to want   to be mindful of this throughout retirement all 
that said it's not necessarily the best move in   every case to move money out of an employer plan 
it might be best just to leave assets where they   are at least for a while or maybe indefinitely 
and that's especially true if you have really   low costs in your employer plan and if you have a 
lot of options in terms of managing the logistics   and getting money out quickly and easily 
whenever you need it for more details on that   check out this other video that should hopefully 
pop up and covers the topic in much more detail   so let's get into some tips that can hopefully 
help you manage your spending and maximize your   spending so that you can enjoy retirement as much 
as possible the first thing to think about is   again you want to be tax aware and that might mean 
paying taxes even though you don't need to so as   you start spending from your assets you're going 
to choose where you pull the money from it might   be a Roth account might be a pre-tax IRA it might 
be a taxable brokerage account or a bank account   so the choices you make are going to affect what 
taxes you pay later and this can be a big deal   especially much later in retirement so you want to 
be looking ahead as you make these decisions it's   not just this year's tax bill it is the next 10 or 
20 years worth of costs that you're going to pay   so for example by paying some taxes intentionally 
at a reasonable rate that you're comfortable with   you might be able to reduce the required minimum 
distributions or RMDs that you have to take later   in life typically after age 72 and that can be 
helpful because again you don't get a big chunk   when you don't want it and also when you're taking 
money out and it adds to your taxable income   that could cause more or most of your social 
security to be taxable and it can also affect how   much you're going to pay for health care so your 
medicare premiums might depend on what your income   is so you want to look at all of these different 
moving parts as you decide what to do and where   to pull money from and maybe doing things like 
Roth conversions even cash reserves often make   retirees more comfortable and that can be helpful 
in times when the markets go down and you don't   want to take withdrawals from things that are at 
a big loss because that can take a big bite out of   your total assets and it can derail a retirement 
plan so if you choose to have some cash reserves   whether it's a couple of years worth or some 
other amount that can be something you hold in   a bank account or other very safe cash equivalent 
type investments or vehicles and that way you can   still spend with confidence without having to 
worry about am i ruining my retirement income   now things can still go badly or they can go badly 
for longer than you expect or want but having a   cash buffer in some cases can certainly improve 
your chances it's also helpful to maximize your   income because that's what supports a lot of your 
spending so part of the spending that you do each   year in retirement comes from withdrawals from 
those assets but the base of your spending or the   base of your total income might be social security 
and pensions or other types of income so whatever   you can do to improve those that's going to help 
you and make it easier to keep spending on the   things you want so social security for example is 
a really helpful tool for spending in retirement   that's because it's a government guaranteed 
and inflation adjusted source of income so if   you can maximize your social security benefits 
without messing up other parts of your finances   that can be helpful so it might make sense not 
to claim as early as possible unless you have   reasons for doing so because you get that nice 
inflation-adjusted payment later that can help you   keep up with your spending and it's also helpful 
to run some numbers as you approach retirement   preferably several years or more beforehand it 
can be surprisingly enlightening to run those   numbers and just play with some calculators that 
way you might identify some opportunities or some   potential problems but the best way to do that is 
just to play with the numbers see how things might   unfold look at some different cash flows how they 
might come out what taxes are you going to pay   what if things go well what if things go not so 
well and by doing that you can learn a lot about   what things might look like for you.

So I hope you 
found this helpful. If you did. please support the   effort by sharing this with somebody or leaving 
a quick thumbs up. Thank you, and take care.

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3 Legged Stool of Retirement Planning: Social Security Plan / Pension Plan / Investment Plan

– One of the most fundamental concepts in retirement planning is the concept of the three-legged stool. We're gonna get into that in this video. (upbeat music) So what is this three-legged stool? Maybe you've heard about
it, maybe you haven't, but just go ahead and
imagine a three-legged stool. Now, for a three-legged stool to work, it's not a four-legged stool,
it's a three-legged stool, for it to work, every one of those legs has to be perfectly aligned. If you shorten one, what's gonna happen? You're gonna tip over, right? If you make one too long,
you're gonna tip over. Same thing goes for retirement planning. And what the three-legged stool is is three different things.

Leg number one is Social Security, and almost everyone has
it in the United States. There's a few pension plans
that made you opt out, but, for the most part, almost everyone has that first leg. And there's a lot of people
who don't have the other two, which makes retirement a little tricky. But the first leg is Social Security. A lot of times, people say, okay, yeah, I know about Social Security, I can take it at 62 or 66 or 70 or whenever it is. Well, yes and no, because it depends, when you should take your Social Security depends on a few different factors. And we've done some
videos on Social Security, and we're gonna go ahead
and link it up here. So if you wanna find out
when you should take it, you can go ahead and click that. But it also depends on the other two legs. The second leg is guaranteed income. And traditionally, the guaranteed
income came from pensions.

Well, as you know, not many people today have pensions. Back in the 50s and 60s and 70s pensions were very common to have. Now, they've become less and less common. Why? Because people are living too long. And because they're living so long, that's what can hurt a
pension plan, longevity. And because not many
people have a pension plan, sometimes they'll look for other forms of guaranteed income. Some people will use annuities, some people will use life insurance, some people will use some type of guaranteed CD or something like that. But they'll use that as
their guaranteed second leg. And the third and last
leg is retirement savings. So this will typically come from IRAs or 401(k)'s, or just money that you've saved up throughout your life towards retirement.

And so that leg is pretty
commonly neglected. People say, well, I've done
a really good job at saving, or I've earned a lot of money, or my interest rate is really good. And they think that that's
all they need for that leg, but that's not true. That leg is the most
important part to adjust based on where the other two legs are. So my recommendation is take a look, and you wanna make sure that your pension leg, your Social Security leg, and your retirement asset leg all match up so you have a
balanced three-legged stool.

A lot of financial advisors don't really talk about the other two because they don't really
get paid on it, right? Most financial advisors get paid on the money that they manage, so the other two are more of a burden. But to have a true retirement plan, you need to make sure
that all of those line up. And sometimes the account that earns the most in your investments is not the one that will keep the rest of your plan balanced. So my recommendation is, if you haven't looked at how all three of those legs combine, look for a financial advisor, and say I want the three-legged stool, and figure out how that fits
in to your retirement plan.

Thank you so much for watching my video. If you wanna see more, you
can click here to subscribe, or you can click right here for a video that YouTube
will think is best for you. It's their algorithm,
don't blame me for it, but I hope you enjoy..

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Pay This Off Before You Retire – Retirement Planning Tips

in this video we'll look at what expenses you should think about getting rid of before retiring and a few mistakes that retirees make when it comes to expenses in retirement there's a few things that you may want to say goodbye to before you say goodbye to that wage or that work income we're going to cover this in three parts it's going to look like this first we'll go over needs and wants and then what i'd call highway robbery and then also what to ear mark in retirement we've seen that the retirees that can get rid of these expenses before retiring have a little bit more breathing room and they feel better about their retirement plan because when you're planning for retirement we usually think about really two types of expenses it's the needs which are the essentials the absolute must-haves to just live you know as you think about my maslow's hierarchy of needs those things at the base layer and then there's the wants which are the the nice to have things but then there are other types of expenses that really don't fit into that category of needs or wants those are the things that we need to be done with before retirement and by the way i'm dave zoller and me and my team we run streamline financial it's a wealth management firm focused on retirement planning and we've been helping people personally for 13 years and streamlines been around for 22 years and we created this channel to share what's working with our clients so that you can benefit too so if you're close to retirement be sure to subscribe because i share one new video each week to make your retirement a little bit better i also put some free resources in the description below like my favorite diy retirement planner if you're more of a do-it-yourselfer so let's get into the list and then as you're watching if i leave something out please share it in the comments below i'd love to hear from you and then also i'll try to reply back to depending on how many comments i get so the first two you will probably agree with but you might not be thinking about the other ones and i want to show you ways to prepare and just make sure that your retirement is a little bit smoother by using our retirement planning software the first one which you already know is to pay off high interest debt which i sometimes think of as highway robbery it's when those interest rates are just so high and they're charging people it just seems unfair right that high interest debt i'm referring to is usually credit card debt and sometimes it's student loan debt and you'd be surprised at the number of people who in their first year of retirement they still have a large monthly payment towards credit card payments or student loan debt and this should be the number one thing that we should focus on to really reduce before we say goodbye to that job income or that wage because if you retire with credit card debt and then you get serious about paying it off in retirement then that means you've got this bigger amount that you got to take from investments which could alter your retirement plans i helped a woman recently who's not a client but she was looking at her plan and she wanted some help and she had about 20k of credit card debt she also had over a million dollars and her regular expenses adding on this 20k of a lump sum expense to her plan it really made quite an impact and once we looked at that together it gave her the motivation to work a little bit extra and extra hard to get this debt payment down to zero or get the credit card debt down to zero before retiring because she'd have a greater peace of mind and it would just increase her confidence as she was going into retirement that peace of mind it's key right i'm sure you're feeling the same way i actually want to share a little bit more about how to achieve this before you retire and during retirement and i share that at the end of this video so stay tuned the next ones are expenses that you can either pay early or at least you want to earmark these in your retirement plan and i'll show you what i mean when i say earmark that just means setting aside funds for specific purposes and either not including those funds in your retirement plan or including them but at least showing the specifics within the plan and i'll show you some images coming up of a retirement plan and how to do this number one thing to earmark is any big travel expenses that you're looking forward to that first year of retirement or really the first few years of retirement a lot of people kick off retirement and they'll really have a big special trip that they've always wanted to take or a place that they've always wanted to go to and lots of times that vacation it's going to cost more than the typical vacation that you might take on a regular year it's really that cap to uh ending work and then really doing a bigger than normal trip some clients choose to take one of those european uh river cruises that are pretty popular and they can cost 10 to 20k or more and knowing that this is a bigger than normal expense or a lump sum expense coming soon into retirement you can either pay that ahead of time like actually many of the cruise places make you do or you can at least earmark it in the plan and make sure that it all works with everything and i'll throw it in there as an example coming up soon here's an example of a retirement plan that's based on annual expenses going up each year three percent regular inflation rate and then over on the left side we can add some expenses that are bigger and irregular you know not the regular every year expenses but things we can earmark so that we can see the impact of on the plan before actually spending the money and doing it this way we can add some peace of mind to your retirement plan and your confidence as you're spending money and so you can just feel that it's a good decision and feel good about that vacation or whatever it might be a few other bigger than normal one-time expenses we've seen are related to your adult kids if you have them whether it's final college expenses or maybe a wedding that you want to help out with or future gifts maybe towards a home purchase or something like that for those you're not really able to pay those before you retire because we don't know when they're going to happen so earmarking them is the next best step and setting funds aside to make sure that these potential expenses that you might have in the future are ready and available ready to deploy when needed one mistake that we've seen some retirees make getting close to retirement is not factoring in these one-time expenses and then getting caught a little off guard when it's time to pay for them especially if we're in a market like we are now now you might be thinking one big expense that i did not mention and before i share that one if you enjoyed watching this video so far and you found it helpful please click the like button so this can hopefully spread to other people who are like you and might find it helpful as well so that one big expense that you might be thinking of that i didn't mention yet is paying off your whole mortgage before you retire and this is a big one for many people as you've heard before behind every financial decision there's also an emotional one as well and many people they feel very strongly or maybe adamant on on being debt-free in retirement and that's a really good feeling for for many people for others depending on their financial decision it actually a mortgage could actually make sense in retirement some people see it as a fixed expense which doesn't go up with inflation it actually gets cheaper as everything else increases with inflation and as one dollar can buy less and less over time which is basically what what inflation is it may be at really attractive interest rates as well and some people want to have a little bit more flexibility in their retirement accounts by keeping some funds available in their non-retirement accounts versus using that money to pay off the mortgage the more important thing to to think about when deciding whether this makes sense whether to pay it off or not is try to measure first just the emotional feeling or comfort with debt you know yourself and then also your spouse if you're married and then step two is map out both scenarios what does it look like that plan that we're just looking at over here what does it look like if you pay off debt early or don't pay off the mortgage at all look at the difference see which one's okay lots of times it comes down to the strength of the emotional feeling around debt for one person in the relationship or if it's just you then it's just whatever you prefer when we're thinking about paying off expenses or earmarking things in retirement get help from a financial professional a cfp could be a great place to start but i'd like to hear from you what did i not mention as we're thinking about these different expenses in retirement i'd love to hear your thoughts about these expenses and especially the thoughts on mortgage having a mortgage in retirement and i want to share another video about how increasing peace of mind and making sure that you get both parts needed for a successful retirement the sad thing is that in this industry the financial industry most of the time they focus on one thing but here's a video to watch that'll help you think about and prepare for both sides of retirement so hopefully i'll see you there and if you haven't already subscribe and then i'll see you in future videos take care you

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10 Essential Tips for Successful Retirement Planning

Hello and welcome to our channel. 
Today we will be discussing the   top 10 tips for retirement planning.
Before we get started, it's important   to note that retirement planning is a personal 
journey and what works for one person may not   work for another. It's important to take the time 
to understand your own financial goals and needs,   and to seek the advice of a financial professional 
if you have any questions or concerns.
  As always, make sure to Like and 
subscribe to the channel to stay   up-to-date on all of the latest news.
Now, without further ado, let's dive   into our top 10 tips for retirement planning:
Number 1. Start saving early. The earlier you   start saving for retirement, the more time your 
money has to grow through compound interest.

Even   if you can only save a small amount each month, 
it's important to start as early as possible. By   starting early, you may be able to retire earlier 
or have more flexibility in your retirement plans.   It's also important to increase your savings 
over time as your income and expenses change.
  Number 2. Contribute to a 401(k) or 
other employer-sponsored retirement plan.   Many employers offer 401(k) plans or 
other retirement savings plans that   allow you to contribute a portion 
of your salary on a pre-tax basis.   This means that the money you contribute to your 
401(k) is not subject to income tax at the time   of contribution, which can help you save more for 
retirement. These plans often come with employer   matching contributions, which can be an excellent 
way to boost your retirement savings.

For example,   if your employer offers a 50% match on your 401(k) 
contributions up to 6% of your salary, and you   contribute 6%, your employer will also contribute 
3% of your salary to your 401(k). It's important   to contribute enough to your 401(k) to take full 
advantage of any employer matching contributions.
  Number 3. Consider a Traditional or Roth IRA. If 
you don't have access to an employer-sponsored   retirement plan, or if you want to save more 
for retirement on top of what you're already   saving through your employer plan, you may want 
to consider opening a Traditional IRA or a Roth   IRA.

These are both individual retirement accounts 
that allow you to save and invest for retirement   on your own. A Traditional IRA allows you to 
contribute on a pre-tax basis, similar to a   401(k), but the contributions are tax-deductible. 
A Roth IRA allows you to contribute after-tax   dollars, but the money grows tax-free and 
can be withdrawn tax-free in retirement. Both   Traditional and Roth IRAs have annual contribution 
limits, so it's important to be aware of these   limits when making your contributions.
Number 4. Diversify your investments.   It's important to diversify your investments in 
order to spread out your risk and potentially   increase your chances of earning a return. This 
can be done by investing in a mix of asset classes   such as stocks, bonds, and cash. Within each 
asset class, you can also diversify by investing   in a variety of individual securities such as 
different types of stocks or bonds. For example,   you could invest in large, medium, and small 
company stocks, as well as international stocks.   This type of diversification can help reduce the 
impact of market fluctuations on your portfolio.
  Number 5.

Understand your risk tolerance. 
Different investment strategies come with   different levels of risk, and it's important to 
understand your own risk tolerance when planning   for retirement. If you're not comfortable 
with a lot of risk, you may want to focus   on more conservative investments such 
as bonds or cash. On the other hand,   if you're willing to take on more risk, you may 
want to invest a larger portion of your portfolio   in stocks. It's important to find the right 
balance for your own situation and to review   your investment strategy regularly to ensure 
it aligns with your goals and risk tolerance.
  Number 6.

Rebalance your portfolio regularly. 
As you get closer to retirement, it may be a   good idea to rebalance your portfolio to be more 
conservative. This can help reduce the potential   for loss as you near retirement and need to 
start withdrawing from your savings. Rebalancing   involves selling some of your higher-risk 
investments and buying more conservative   investments in order to bring your portfolio back 
into alignment with your desired asset allocation.   For example, if you originally had a 60/40 
asset allocation (60% stocks, 40% bonds),   but the value of your stocks has increased 
significantly, you may want to sell some   of your stocks and buy more bonds in order to 
bring your portfolio back to a 60/40 allocation.   Rebalancing should be done on a regular 
basis, such as annually or every few years,   to ensure that your portfolio stays in 
line with your goals and risk tolerance.
  Number 7.

Consider working with a financial 
advisor. A financial advisor can help you   develop a retirement plan that aligns with 
your financial goals and needs. They can help   you understand your options and make informed 
decisions about your retirement savings. They   can also help you create a financial plan that 
takes into account your current and future income,   expenses, and debt. Working with a financial 
advisor can be especially helpful if you have a   complex financial situation or if you're not sure 
where to start with your retirement planning.
  Number 8.

Plan for healthcare expenses. Healthcare 
expenses can be a significant factor in retirement   planning, especially as you age. It's important to 
consider how you will pay for healthcare expenses   in retirement, whether that be through Medicare, a 
private insurance plan, or out-of-pocket expenses.   Medicare is a government-run health 
insurance program for those 65 and older,   but it does not cover all medical expenses. You 
may need to purchase additional coverage, such   as a Medigap policy or a Medicare Advantage plan, 
to fill the gaps in coverage. It's also important   to consider the potential costs of long-term care, 
such as nursing home or assisted living expenses.
  Number 9.

Think about your lifestyle in 
retirement. It's important to consider what your   lifestyle will be like in retirement and how much 
money you will need to sustain it. Will you want   to travel or pursue hobbies? Will you need to pay 
for housing or will you have a mortgage-free home?   Understanding your retirement lifestyle can help 
you plan for the amount of money you will need to   save. It's also important to consider how long you 
expect to live in retirement and whether you will   have any sources of income besides your retirement 
savings, such as a pension or part-time work.
  Number 10. Keep an eye on your retirement 
accounts. As you get closer to retirement,   it's important to regularly check in on your 
retirement accounts and make sure they are   on track to meet your goals.

This can help 
you identify any areas that need improvement   and make any necessary adjustments to your 
retirement plan. It's also a good idea to   review your investment strategy and make sure 
it's still appropriate for your situation.   If you're working with a financial advisor, 
they can help you with this review and   make any necessary changes to your plan.
Thank you for watching. We hope these tips   have been helpful as you plan for your retirement. 
Remember to consult with a financial professional   if you have any questions or concerns.
Make sure to Like and subscribe below to   stay up to date on all of the latest 
news. We will see you next time!.

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3 Ways to Invest Your Retirement Money | CA Rachana Ranade

Well today, I am going to tell you a story, 
a story of an ant and a grasshopper. When it   was a nice sunny day, the grasshopper was 
merrily singing certain nice tunes and he   was enjoying the weather while, on the other 
side the ants were very busy gathering food   so that they don't have to face a problem 
on a rainy day. Then what happened that,   the rain started and when the rains were 
pouring heavily, the ants were enjoying the food   in their own small home. Poor grasshopper, what 
might have happened to him? You want to see that,   the grasshopper is also merrily enjoying food,   because he's not the grasshopper of that original 
story, he's the next gen grasshopper, he knows   how to plan for his future, maybe he's seen my 
lectures and that's why he's a smart grasshopper.   Hey folks, CA Rachana Ranade here and I welcome 
you all to a brand new video which is about   how to park your retirement corpus.

I am sure 
that grasshopper hasn't still left your mind,   you might be wondering how did he get that 
food, so it's all about proper planning,   proper goal setting and if you're still 
not aware about how to set smart goals,   just have a look at this lecture whenever time 
permits and I am sure that that grasshopper   might be very very keen on learning, he might 
have set his retirement goal very nicely,   that's why he was able to enjoy the summer 
as well as the post retirement phase. Well now, it's time to press the reset button, 
why? Because you were in the accumulation phase   of your life till now but, right now we're 
assuming that you have already reached that   retirement phase and now, you're going to go into 
the decumulation phase. You might be wondering,   what is this? So this video, to be very honest, is 
not targeted for people who are in 20s or in their   30s, this is more targeted towards people who 
are at their retirement age of let's say 60 years   or even if you are 30 years, maybe, you can 
definitely watch this video for your parents   right, because they are going to be the ones who 
might receive a lump sum amount at retirement   and then they might get confused as to how can I 
park these funds so that I can decumulate them, so   that I can utilize them, withdraw them very nicely 
and lead a very comfortable life post retirement.   So just to give you one more quick clarification, 
accumulation phase happens when you are working,   whenever you are keeping that small part of 
your income so that you can easily retire early,   retire rich and now once you have 
reached this retirement phase,   now it's all about withdrawing your 
investments and leading a peaceful life.

Many times people ask me on WhatsApp or through 
emails that Rachana, we have received an x amount   as a lump sum retirement amount, now where 
should we invest this. If you really ask me,   there's no single answer for that, I will give you 
an example for this as well. Assume that there are   three friends a, b and c. Almost 25, 30 years ago, 
all had decided that when we retire, we should   have a retirement corpus of one crore rupees and 
today all of these three people have retired.   Budgeted amount was how much, target amount 
was one crore but, let's understand actually   what have they achieved, Mr. A saved only 30 
lakh rupees so I can say today his investment   corpus is just 30 lakh rupees, for b it is 90 lakh 
rupees, 90 lakhs is very close to the target and c   has managed to invest two crore rupees for his 
retirement. Now you only tell me one thing,   can I give them one single strategy or 
the strategies have to be different?   Answer is, the strategies have to 
be different but what will be the   strategies is exactly what we are going 
to discuss in the next part of the video.   So now let's understand all these three cases one 
by one.

The very first one, if you remember is of   Mr. A, whose target saving for retirement was 
one crore but he actually ended up only with 30   lakh rupees. Now what do you think, out of these 
three strategies, what should be his focus on,   should it be on income generation, on corpus 
protection or on corpus growth? Ideally, it should   be mainly on income generation and of course 
on corpus protection. He can't take the risk to   grow his corpus by putting his corpus in risky 
instruments like equity post retirement right.   So what are few solutions for Mr.

A, solution 
number one, unfortunately he will still have to   make a point to earn additional income, now how, 
if he is a skilled person, he might still give   some certain consultancy services and earn money 
Possibility number two if that's not, I mean if   that's not doable, maybe if he's staying in his 
own house, he can sub rent a part of his house,   so let's say he can have a paying guest to whom 
he can just give like one bedroom of his house,   something like an Airbnb model, can be operated 
by him as well right.

One more possibility is   that if he is able to cut down luxury to 
almost zero percent levels, then he will be   able to survive through his retirement and one 
last point which he will have to do is that,   even if he's spending on essentials, he will have 
to spend on the essentials very very tightly. So   I hope all the young viewers out there, they 
might have understood that come what may,   I don't want to be Mr.A post retirement. Now let's 
go to the case of Mr. B, his targeted saving for   retirement were one crore rupees and how much did 
he end up saving, he ended up saving 90 lakhs,   almost hitting the target right. What should be 
his focus on? His focus should be on number one   corpus protection, because he's almost there. 
Now, he doesn't want to lose the corpus but,   simultaneously he also wants to generate certain 
income. So for that what will he have to do,   number one, he should ensure as I mentioned that 
his capital is not eroded, so, for that can he   invest in equity, direct equity? No. He has to 
ensure that capital is not eroded number one.   Number two, can he still afford a slight amount 
of luxury, why not slight amount of luxury is   affordable because he's very close to his target 
and number three, what he can do is that he can   invest a part of his funds in something like 
a conservative fund wherein, 75 to 80 percent   exposure is given to debt and a very minor 
portion is it is actually allocated to equity,   so I can say that corpus growth can be a very 
very slight point which may be considered but,   again I am repeating, major focus on what, major 
focus on corpus protection and income generation.   Let's move on to case number c.

For case number 
c, he's at the most amazing position because his   target saving was one crore he has ended up saving 
to crore. Does he have to really bother about   something right now, no. Can he actually live 
his retirement life in luxury, absolutely yes.   Can he invest in equity as well, this person, 
yes, why not, because for him capital protection   is not very a big running crisis, he also has 
surplus corpus. So he can risk out some of his   money in equity. Now whether in direct equity or 
in equity mutual funds depends on his knowledge   right. So after understanding all these 
points, I hope you have understood that Mr.

C   has two further possibilities, possibility number 
one if he lives to the age where he had predicted,   let's say he had predicted that he lived 
to 70 and if he lives only till that age,   he will be able to keep some corpus even 
for his nominees, for his legal heirs.   If he outlives his expectation so for example he 
had planned that he will die at 70 as an example   and he lives till 80, still will he have 
the corpus to live that additional 10 years,   yes, because he has that additional quotient.

So 
all those youngsters out here watching the video,   I hope you understood that you surely love if you 
are Mr. C while you are at your retirement age.   Well before we move ahead to understanding the 
various investment options available, we have   to understand two prerequisites, which are these 
two, number one, even if you are in the retirement   phase, very very very important is the emergency 
fund. Now what is emergency fund, it's something   like you should have almost three to six months 
of your expenses very easily available with,   you it could be in your savings account, it could 
be in your FD, okay it could be in liquid fund but   it should be very much easily accessible. If 
you want to know more about emergency funds,   I have already made a video on that you can check 
it out later. Number two, very very important,   you should have a health insurance because as and 
how you grow more in age, chances that you might   face illness, you might face hospitalization 
or a shade higher so, you must have a proper   health insurance.

If you want to know more about 
health insurance again I have made a separate   video on that, I have recently released this on 
the channel. So be sure that you have knowledge   about both these two points and then only move on 
to understanding the various investment options. Emergency funds ticked off, health insurance 
ticked off, I am not saying tic toc, ticked   off okay.

Now with this let's move on to the 
government schemes and we are going to focus on   three schemes. The very first one is SCSS, senior 
citizen saving scheme. The second one is PMVVY   which is the Pradhan Mantri Yaya Vandana Yojana 
and the last one is POMIS which is post office   monthly income scheme. Well to be very honest, the 
first two are absolutely retirement focus schemes,   the third one can be opened even by people who 
have not attained the age of 60. So for example,   if I want to open a POMIS, I can, I can also open 
it in the name of a minor as well okay, but, then   why are we discussing it here, because it offers 
a benefit of a monthly income scheme, that's the   reason why I am discussing it in this section 
right. So let's understand all these three one   by one. Where can you open an account under SCSS, 
it can be opened up with any authorized bank or a   post office, for PMVVY it is solely operated by 
LIC. So if you want to open an account, you have   to approach an LIC agent or you can go directly 
to the LIC office.

For a monthly income scheme,   you have to open it with a post office I mean, you 
have to go to a post office and open an account.   Eligibility for SCSS, ideal eligibility is 60 
years but with certain uh conditions so for   example, if you have taken a early VRS, a special 
VRS, then age limit is taken down to 55. If you   are a defense personnel, the age limit is taken 
further down to 50 right, for PMVVY, it's a flat   age of 60 years and for POMIS as I mentioned, 
there is no age limit even a person of 20 years,   30 years, 40 years, 60 years also can open 
this account right. The next one is about term   tenure, for SCSS it is five years and it can be 
extended to further three years for VVY, it is   ten years and for POMIS, it is five years. How 
much are the interest rates? For the first two,   interest rates are seven point four percent 
for the quarter one of 21, 22.

So what does   this mean? Can the government change these 
interest rates periodically, unfortunately,   answer is yes. Can they do a downward revision, 
yes, can also they do an upward revision, yes   okay, but, recent past may they have been in 
a downward trend okay but, still I can say   that seven point four percent right now is not 
bad at all, okay. When you get paid out is the   big question now, if you're talking about SCSS, 
you get paid out quarterly, for VVY, you get, you   have an option you can choose monthly, quarterly, 
half yearly, yearly whatever and for POMIS,   as it's a monthly income scheme, it will be paid 
out on a monthly basis.

Minimum deposit, maximum   deposit is very well mentioned in this table you 
can see here, minimum is 1000 and its multiples   maximum is 15 lakhs. For VVY, 1.5 lakhs for a 
yearly pension and 15 lakhs for a monthly pension,   for post office MIS, it's thousand and it's and 
it's multiples and for maximum amounts it is 4.5   lakhs if it's a single account and 9 lakh if it's 
a joint account. There are certain clauses about   withdrawal and penalty as well, if you want you 
can just press the pause button, read out the   penalty and withdrawal clauses and then again play 
okay. So it's nothing like to be taught as such.   For taxation, for SCSS, PMVVY both are eligible 
under ATC, for POMIS it's not eligible under ATC.   If you check out, for all these three schemes, the 
aim is common and what is the aim, aim is income   generation and corpus protection.

Is there 100% 
corpus protection, yes, because all three schemes   are somewhere related directly to post office or 
to the government, so it's as good as saying that   government defaulted ,very rare scenario right. So 
in this case, I can say that corpus protection is   absolutely guaranteed, so go back again to case a, 
b and c. To whom is this absolutely suitable for,   it is absolutely suitable for the case a 
category.

Can case b, can Mr. B also invest   some part in this, absolutely yes, why not. A 
little less as compared to A and for c this,   can be a comparatively lower amount which 
can be invested in these three schemes. So I hope you have understood very well about 
the government schemes. Now let's move on to   investing in mutual funds. Ff you remember, I 
told you that depending on the risk appetite,   one can choose whether he should go for a debt 
fund or to a balanced fund, in that also we talked   about a conservative fund, you remember when I 
said 75 to 80 percent exposure will go to debt   ,only that balance small small portion to equity 
and the third one can be actually investing in   equity oriented funds but, that was for whom a? 
b? for c, because he had a lot of surplus corpus   as well right.

So let's understand one by one if 
I am talking again about Mr. A. is this option   available for him, none, neither debt, nor equity. 
Ideally, you should go ahead with a very safe   government scheme point only right. If I am 
talking about b, can b invest a part of his   corpus in debt funds, answer is yes, why not, he 
can do that. Now if he is interested in income   generation, what he can do is invest in debt 
fund and then go ahead with an SWP, what is SWP,   systematic withdrawal plan.

So like in SIP you 
transfer x amount monthly to that investment   that is mutual fund right, instead of investing 
monthly, here you withdraw monthly that is known   as a systematic withdrawal plan okay. So what is 
step number one, invest one chunk in debt fund   at one shot and keep on withdrawing part by part 
every month, that will give you a steady flow of   income per month right.

Possibility number two, 
if you want to go ahead with investing in equity,   now invest in equity was for whom ,ideally for 
Mr. C so now, let's understand how c will plan   his investment in equity mutual funds. Is he 
going to directly invest in equity mutual fund,   no understand how he would do it. So assume 
whatever chunk he has decided, first the entire   chunk will go in a debt mutual fund right and from 
the debt mutual fund, money will be systematically   transferred to the equity oriented mutual fund. 
So this is not called as an SWP, it is called   as an STP that is nothing but a systematic 
transfer plan.

So what will happen in this,   it is as good as an SIP only, but SIP is when? 
When you pay out of your own pocket every month,   in STP what happens, money has already gone out 
from your pocket you know it's there in the debt   fund, it's parked in the debt fund. Now money 
is only being transferred from a debt fund to   an equity fund. I hope you have understood what is 
a debt fund, who should invest in a debt fund. If   you remember we also talked about a conservative 
fund, a hybrid fund, we did talk about investing   in equity oriented mutual fund that was mainly for 
Mr. C, we also talked about SIP, SWP, STP wow, but   wait, still one big question remains how to choose 
which mutual fund, for that, I have a separate   course on magic of mutual funds so you can surely 
think about investing in this course, you'll get a   lot of knowledge about how to choose a mutual fund 
and so that you can invest with full confidence.

Let's move on with our last investment 
avenue, which is investing in equity,   my favorite one right. But then, is it 
applicable for Mr. A, no, b, no, for c,   yes. But then, how? Can you invest directly in 
equity ,that depends on whether that person has   that much knowledge on equity or not. If he does 
not have knowledge, he can acquire that as well.   I will definitely like to share a very nice 
experience which I had. So whoever enrolls for   my courses on various like basics of stock market, 
fundamental analysis, technical analysis whatever,   I do conduct a zoom meeting sessions every 
month with all these participants. There is   one participant named Shashi and she is I guess 
60 plus years. She has been a scientist, has zero   commerce background but then, post retirement she 
said, I would love to learn about stock markets.   She has learned a lot about stock market, she 
keeps on asking me questions every month and I   am so happy to answer her questions. That's how it 
shows that there is no age barrier for learning,   so if you still believe that you have that 
enthusiasm for learning, age is just a number,   right.

So, what you can do if you have that 
knowledge in stock market ,you can invest,   if you don't have, acquire the knowledge first and 
then invest in stock market but again coming back   to our case study, this one is not applicable for 
a, b it's applicable only for c. Next option can   be investing in Nifty bees. So if you don't know 
what are bees, what are Nifty bees, I have already   made a separate video on that. I have talked 
about various types of bees like gold bees,   Nifty bees, bank bees, in that video you will 
get a detailed input on what are nifty bees. You might stop working, but, your 
money might not stop working,   If, you have parked it efficiently.

I hope 
you have enjoyed this video. If you have,   don't forget to share it with your friends 
till then take care, Jai Hind and bye bye..

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Why Some Retirees Succeed and Others Live in Worry – 5 Retirement Truths

I want to share one of the most valuable pieces of retirement advice that I've ever heard if you're thinking about your retirement and you're wondering if you're doing the right thing or think that you should be doing something different or if you're just worried about all the things going on right now whether it's the economy or the markets or the value of your accounts be sure to watch this video because I'm going to share the retirement truths that every retiree goes through and it's these things right here we're going to cover today and every retiree goes through it and it they experience this in retirement so it's going to go over this and then also what to expect in retirement and then how to give yourself the best chances of maintaining your lifestyle in retirement as well now the negative of these retirement truths that we're going to look at is that many of them lead to increased uncertainty or worry about your retirement one of our goals though as we're thinking about it is really the opposite of uncertainty or worry in retirement it really should be more about confidence right the next years really all the way up until you pass away wait these are the the magic ears these could be the best years of your life and I know that because there's an actual study a research study uh proving this so let me pull that up really quick and show you the results and I'll link to it below people were asked to score their life satisfaction from zero to ten where 10 is the best possible life and then zero is the worst possible life and this is really just the average score by age and I thought it was encouraging to see that life satisfaction tends to increase as you can see as we get older and then it tends to Trail off as we get older but really the area the the period of time we want to focus on is that this is the magic time and we know this to be true as well because we've helped hundreds of pre-retirees move into retirement with confidence and excitement and these were the people who were coming to us that were feeling somewhat unsure or not 100 confident with their money plan and our firm streamline Financial has been around for 24 years and we've made it through quite a few bad Market periods with our clients and by the way if I haven't met you yet I'm Dave zoller and I own streamline Financial with Tim and Luke and Sean and if you're working with an advisor now that's mainly focused on investments and investment planning but doesn't talk about these key retirement strategies like the tax efficient withdrawal planning and income planning or just tax reduction overall feel free to reach out to us through the website now we don't always have time but I'll get back to you either way so let's get into this first truth in retirement it will be common to have that thought of maybe I should be be making a change or should I be doing something different it'll be normal to feel this way in retirement especially when you see the news or you're listening to friends talk about their finances there's this feeling or this thought of really making us doubt our current plan which causes some people to make more emotional decisions instead of making smart financial decisions and a good way to avoid this is really to avoid this feeling is by having an understanding of your plan which really leads to more confidence with what you're doing and having a plan for both the good times and also the bad Mark of times so that you know that you're prepared for either one of those and I'll give you some ways to achieve this coming up in this video now on to the second thing that comes up in retirement that we just have to be prepared for is we need to expect bear markets right you've most likely lived through a lot of them already and really in retirement though they feel a little bit different usually worse but because of the frequency creating a plan with bear markets in mind and really big Corrections built into the plan is a smart thing to do that way you don't have to worry when they eventually come now if you're not sure how to model out these various what-if scenarios or bad Market scenarios for your plan then you may want to talk to a cfp or check out my favorite retirement income planner below this video you should see a link to it it's one of the best consumer facing planners that I've seen and it doesn't cost thousands of dollars like the ones that we use for our clients the next thing to bring up is for pre-retirees who are close to stopping their wage especially if that's during bad markets they may think should I work a little bit longer maybe just one more year to kind of make it through this this difficult period we actually had a client call us up about five months ago and uh no she was five months into retirement and she said something like it seems like so much bad news is out there and what's going on with the markets I'm wondering if I it would have been better if I should have just kept working so we reviewed her plan and because we built in to her plan this expectation of bad markets everything looked great and and really the only reason to keep working would be if she really enjoyed this sort of work that she was doing and it brought her some some purpose but she didn't so it was great it was great confirmation that she was still on the right track so if this sounds like you take a look at another video I recorded I'm gonna either link on this screen or it'll be below and it gives a few real examples of what working an extra year might look like in a financial plan the next thing to know is that no one really knows what's going to happen next it seems like everybody has a prediction on TV or YouTube or at the dinner table with family or with friends and no one really knows what is definitely going to happen we know this uh in a logical way because you know there's that saying if you put 10 economists in the room together and they come up they need to come up with a conclusion they'll come up with 12 of different answers when they walk out knowing that it's important to prepare your investment plan for that four economic Seasons that we may go through in the future since we don't know which one we're going to go through next so just as as an example you've seen it before the four economic seasons are higher than expected economic growth or lower than expected economic growth and then higher than expected inflation or lower than expected inflation and there's asset classes that can do well in each one of those now again we don't know which way we're headed but having asset classes and each one of those potential Seasons that could be beneficial now that's just my opinion and really it's for all of this talk to your own Financial professionals before doing anything like this now on to the next one which really has more to do with human psychology than investment strategy and then after that I'll share the the really the most helpful piece of advice that I've heard related to retirement planning but if you'd like this so far please click on the the like button and and maybe this video can help somebody else going through the same things that that you're looking forward to so the next truth is in retirement we may have a tendency to compare ourselves to others the grass is always greener on the other side of the fence really throughout life that's we've got that tendency to compare it to others but it can harm us in retirement too if we do a video on this channel that mentions a dollar amount as an example we don't want that to really make you feel better or feel worse about your current situation because you know we help high net worth families at streamline Financial we sometimes mention big numbers but we don't want it to be about the numbers we really want to communicate just the principles and the strategies that can can really be applied to to anybody's finances and there's always going to be people with more than us and then there's always going to be people with less than us and the one who wins is the one who's content and at peace most at peace with their current situation you know that saying if I want to be able to practice being content with a little and I want to be able to practice being content with a lot and and you know healthy competition that's okay but comparing ourselves to someone else because uh you know if it causes us a feel of lack or less than that can hurt our retirement plans because that leads really back to that first point that we talked about in uh in this list of feeling like we should be doing something different for example if we see a guy on the internet and he's investing a certain way or he's deciding he's changing up his entire strategy um because of what's happening with the economy then that may cause us to feel like we should be doing something different and then start to increase the emotional level of uh of our decision making instead of staying to strictly logical or financial levels but again it's a normal feeling to feel that worry or fear or anxiety um with what's happening during during current periods but one of the most helpful pieces of advice that I've heard that we can apply to retirement planning is really the difference between those two words fear and anxiety knowing the difference between those two is actually very very helpful as we're planning retirement and talking about money that is if we want to feel better about what we're doing right now when we think about fear and anxiety we might think of them as being the same thing but actually they're completely different things and let me just pull up these two definitions if I can really quickly fear is a caution over a real and present danger and then anxiety is a worry over an imagined future danger now fear if we've got something right in front of us then it's obviously a very helpful tool for us as humans anxiety though is not always a helpful tool as as we're trying to process things partly because these anxieties there's nothing we can do to control or influence them you may have seen this drawing from Carl Richards before about things that matter and then things I can control here's a place to focus and then another way to look at it is we actually sent this to clients not too long ago on a video of what you can't control and what you can control so we can't control the markets and inflation and what they're doing with interest rates or what's happening in the news or the world or tax laws or the elections but a lot of these things actually do relate to things that we can control for instance you know markets are inflation or interest rates your portfolio allocation you can control that you can control when to pay taxes when it's related to in investing you know as we're talking about Roth conversions or the the costs the tax cost tax drag on some of the portfolio and not to get too nerdy about these things but two of the biggest things that we've seen is this idea of not controlling the news but what we can control is news consumption we've seen a big shift with uh some people who instead of someone who wants to consume the news they switch from TV news to reading news where you have a little bit more control of what's coming at you versus TV is just the next thing is coming at you if you know what I mean I don't know if that's if I if I'm explaining that the right way but back to the this video all the things that we mentioned before earlier here um a lot of these can be anxiety-inducing things as well right the severity of a bear Market or not being able to predict what's going to happen next in the world or comparing ourselves and doubting our plan or thinking that we don't have as much as as we wish we had when it comes to to money or the you know what if this happens and what if this happens how is that going to impact my plan and that can lead that sort of thinking can lead to paralysis and really no action being taken but what if you had a plan that was built in to show those different what-if scenarios so instead of the unknown future danger you're able to get more concrete scenarios in the plan as a result that's what I would recommend once you get get it out in the open then it becomes a lot less scary we both know that so either find a great certified financial planner who can show you that and show you the what-if scenarios or check out the the DIY planner or a different planner that helps you put in those what-if scenarios as well so it becomes less scary so don't forget anxiety is it can be the thief of Dreams it takes you away from enjoying the the present moment and it stops you from even taking the right action to make things better in the future because it really just makes you only focused on on the negative as you're you're moving through life that video that I mentioned earlier is called why delaying retirement might not be a good idea if you're pre-retirement and you're thinking you want to work a little bit longer because of what's going on take a look at that one coming up next or below and then I'll see you in the next video take care foreign [Music]

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Why This Investment System Can Help Retirees Worry Less About Their Retirement Plan

I want to share an investment system for retirees to hopefully assist you as you're thinking about and planning for your retirement we're also going to look at how to prepare your retirement for the multiple potential potential economic Seasons that we may be headed into so we want to look at the multiple seasons and then the Easy System that's going to help lower taxes and then lower risk as well now if I haven't met you yet I'm Dave zoller and we help people plan for and Implement these retirement strategies really for a select number of people at streamline Financial that's our retirement planning firm but because we can't help everyone we want to share this with you as well so if you like retirement specific videos about one per week be sure to subscribe so in order to create a proper investment plan in system we want to make sure that we build out the retirement income plan first because without the income plan it's much harder to design the right investment strategy it's kind of like without the income plan it's like you're guessing at well 60 40 portfolio sounds good or you know May maybe this amount in the conservative bucket sounds reasonable you already know and and you feel that as you get close to retirement that goal of just more money isn't the the end-all goal that we should really be aiming for for retirement it's more about sustainability and certainty and then really the certainty of income and possibly less risk than before the last 30 years uh the things that you did to be successful with the financial side are going to look different than the next 20 or 30 years now if you need help defining the the income plan a little bit then look at the DIY retirement course below this video now once you do Define your goals for retirement and then the income needed to achieve those goals then creating the investment system becomes a lot easier and within the investment plan we really know that we can only control three things in all three things we actually want to minimize through this investment system the first thing we can minimize or reduce is how much tax you pay when investing we had a a client who was not a client of streamline Financial but of a tax firm coming to the the CPA firm in March to pick up his tax return and he was completely surprised that he had sixty thousand dollars of extra income on his tax return that he had to pay tax on right away before April 15th and it was due to the capital gains being recognized and other distributions within his investment account and he said but I didn't sell anything and the account didn't even go up that much last year and I got to pay tax on it but he was already in the highest tax bracket paying about close to 37 percent on short-term capital gains and dividends and interest so that was an unpleasant surprise and we see it happen more often than it should but this can really be avoided and here's two ways we can control tax so that we don't have to have that happen and really just control tax and pay less of it is the goal and I'll keep this at a high level but it'll get the the point across number one is the kinds of Investments that you own some are maybe funds or ETFs or individual uh equities or things like that the funds and ETFs they could pass on capital gains and and distributions to you each year without you even doing anything without you selling or or buying but it happens within the fund a lot of times now we would use funds and ETFs that are considered tax efficient so that our clients they can decide when to recognize gains rather than letting the fund company decide now the second way is by using a strategy that's called tlh each year there's many many fluctuations or big fluctuations that happen in an investment account and the strategy that we call tlh that allows our clients that's tax loss harvesting it allows them to sell an investment that may be down for part of the year and then move it into a very similar investment right away so that the investment strategy stays the same and they can actually take a write-off on that loss on their taxes that year now there's some rules around this again we're going high level but it offsets uh you know for that one client who are not a client but who had the big sixty thousand dollars of income he could have been offsetting those capital gains by doing tlh or tax loss harvesting that strategy has really saved hundreds and thousands of of dollars for clients over a period of years so on to the next thing that we can control in our investment plan and that's cost this one's easier but many advisors they don't do it because it ends up paying them less now since we're certified financial planner professionals we do follow the fiduciary standard and we're obligated to do what's best for our clients so tell me this if you had two Investments and they had the exact same strategy the same Returns the same risk and the same tax efficiency would you rather want the one that costs 0.05 percent per year or the one that costs 12 times more at point six percent well I know that answer is obvious and we'd go with a lower cost funds if it was all the same low-cost funds and ETFs that's how we can really help reduce the cost or that's how you can help reduce the cost in your investment plan because every basis point or part of a percentage that's saved in cost it's added to your return each year and this adds up to a lot over time now the last thing that we want to minimize and control is risk and we already talked about the flaws of investing solely based on on risk tolerance and when it comes to risk a lot of people think that term risk tolerance you know how much risk can we on a scale of one to ten where are we on the the risk factor but there's another way to look at risk in your investment strategy and like King Solomon we believe that there's a season for everything or like the if it was the bird song There's a season for everything and we also believe that there's four different seasons in investing and depending on what season we're in some Investments perform better than others and the Four Seasons are pull it up right now it's higher than expected inflation which we might be feeling but there's also a season that can be lower than expected or deflation and then there's higher than expected economic growth or lower than expected economic growth and the goal is reduce the risk in investing by making sure that we're prepared for each and every one of those potential Seasons because there are individual asset classes that tend to do well during each one of those seasons and we don't know nobody knows what's really going to happen you know people would would speculate and say oh it's going to be this or this or whatever might happen but we don't know for sure that's why we want to make sure we just have the asset classes in the right spots so that the income plan doesn't get impacted so the investment system combined with the income system clients don't have to worry about the movements in the market because they know they've got enough to weather any potential season I hope this has been helpful for you so far as you're thinking about your retirement if it was please subscribe or like this video so that hopefully other people can be helped as well and then I'll see you in the next one take care thank you

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What Retirement Income Puts You In The Top 1%

what income does it take to be in the top 1% of all retirees you'd think that'd be a relatively simple project to research turns out it wasn't so stick around and benefit from the work that I did to uncover these hardto find numbers let's go for a walk and and talk about it and you know the first thing I want to observe is that most of us probably would not recognize could not tell by the lifestyle folks that are in the top 10% of all Rey income when I get to the numbers I I think you'll you'll say okay I think I would be able to recognize people that are in the top 1% I'll give you a hint it's a it's a much bigger number than than I thought it was going to be okay and and so why is that you know why wouldn't we recognize uh the folks that are in the top 10% and it's because like a lot of things in life you know if you look at Millionaires and millionaires Lifestyles you know 70% of millionaires in America or self-made and and most of them most of us uh got there um by being you know uh uh careful with our money and and and being good Savers as as much as uh being fortunate and and receiving a a good salary along the way okay so I'm going to start off with what these numbers look like for all Americans and this is from a large data set they say it's the largest population data set uh in the world and the organization is called ipums and this is for all Americans not just retire so um to be in the top well first let's start off with median and and this is household this is household income the median household income uh in the United States for for everybody all ages is is $70,000 to be in the top 25% you've got to make about $130,000 000 to be in the top 10% you're making a little over $200,000 the household income a little over 200,000 it's 212,000 and to be in the top 1% you're making over $500,000 a year now um and the number is 570,000 what was interesting is each of those groups from um 2021 to 2022 so this is a data set uh that they released the results of at the end of 2022 each of those groups got a raise between 2021 and 2022 unfortunately from the median and Below on an inflation adjusted basis folks that are at the median below uh are actually making less on an inflation adjusted basis folks that are above the median are making more in 20122 and we've heard this play out in the press okay so so those are the income levels now now let's talk about savings and there's a really interesting point I want to I want to share with you here okay to be in the um to be in the top 1% of Savers in the United States this is the top 1% if you're between 65 and 69 75 and 79 or over 80 it's to be in the top 1% you've got to have $2.7 million in what's called net worth the net worth is just take all of your assets all of your savings accounts the value if you own a house the value of your house and subtract from it the the the debt that you have on that essentially so you just take all of your assets and you subtract all your liabilities your car loan your your mortgage your credit card debt hopefully you don't have too many of the latter too uh and that's your net worth so um if you have a net worth of $2.7 million a household net worth uh in the United States you're in the top 1% what I want to point out is you know if you look at the income boy that income is really staggering right I mean the top 1% of income is 570,000 or higher and you know some people will say well you know that number seemed a little low I was expecting that top 1% of income to be higher and I I agree but that's like the last person that made it into the top 1% so there's plenty of people in that category that are making a lot more money but think about this you know the the lowest income in the top 1% is almost $600,000 right it's $570,000 yet to be the top 1% in savings you just need $2.7 million or more um and what that tells me is you know as a society as a country it's no surprise we're not saving enough money and so um it's not enough to make a great salary you've got to be able to to save it but to me that was just staggering that you know essentially that top 1% you know if they were the Savers they essentially have saved um what five years worth of income uh and most of us could not retire if we had just saved five years worth of income right so that just shows just the the importance of living below your means and and saving as much as you can okay let's keep going now I'm going to Break It Out by desile and again this is household and this is according to the Congressional research service so the the lower quintile so there's five groups the lower 1 the lower 20% of Americans are making under $22,000 a year then the next group up from that are making you know between that 22,000 and 40,000 the next group up to that is is making between 40,000 and 65,000 um so you can see that you know 80% of Americans households are making less than $65,000 a year now I haven't got to retirement that's coming up here really soon um let me get to the top quintile the top quintile households in America are a little over $110,000 let's call it $111,000 okay so now let's get to what I finally was able to find out so I've shared a lot of information here and I think many of you are listening to this this uh these numbers and saying you know what I'm doing okay you know it's hard to get that high high salary but if you're saving and if if you're uh spending less than you earn if you're saving that and then importantly if you're investing that remember it's not enough to just save you have to invest it you have to get compounding working for you so a lot of you I think are looking at the at least the savings number and saying yeah we're doing okay we're doing okay and I hope you are I hope you are okay so now getting on to the uh uh the the top income in retirement uh and before I get there if you're enjoying this video take a quick second and hit the like button it really does help the algorithm uh find other people that this this video uh and my videos can help okay so um I'm going to break this out the top 10% the top 5% and the top 1% so people people 65 to 69 now this is people that are working and not working top 10% is 200,000 top 5% is$ 260,000 top 1% is essentially $1 million okay so that's 65 to 69 and now for people 70 to 74 numbers come down a little bit top 10% is $170,000 top 5% uh is $26 is that right yeah 265,000 and the last number is a million dollar so retirees to be in the top 1% of all people 65 and older you need to be making a million dollars a year just to put that in perspective that rule of 25 if that's what the uh if that's what the income is then they had they'd have to have $25 million in savings by the the rule of 4% I hope you found this video helpful if you did I know you're going to like this video up here that talks about average income for retirees in America and this video down here that talks about five reasons to retire as soon as you can thanks for watching bye-bye

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Why This Investment System Can Help Retirees Worry Less About Their Retirement Plan

I want to share an investment system for retirees to hopefully assist you as you're thinking about and planning for your retirement we're also going to look at how to prepare your retirement for the multiple potential potential economic Seasons that we may be headed into so we want to look at the multiple seasons and then the Easy System that's going to help lower taxes and then lower risk as well now if I haven't met you yet I'm Dave zoller and we help people plan for and Implement these retirement strategies really for a select number of people at streamline Financial that's our retirement planning firm but because we can't help everyone we want to share this with you as well so if you like retirement specific videos about one per week be sure to subscribe so in order to create a proper investment plan in system we want to make sure that we build out the retirement income plan first because without the income plan it's much harder to design the right investment strategy it's kind of like without the income plan it's like you're guessing at well 60 40 portfolio sounds good or you know May maybe this amount in the conservative bucket sounds reasonable you already know and and you feel that as you get close to retirement that goal of just more money isn't the the end-all goal that we should really be aiming for for retirement it's more about sustainability and certainty and then really the certainty of income and possibly less risk than before the last 30 years uh the things that you did to be successful with the financial side are going to look different than the next 20 or 30 years now if you need help defining the the income plan a little bit then look at the DIY retirement course below this video now once you do Define your goals for retirement and then the income needed to achieve those goals then creating the investment system becomes a lot easier and within the investment plan we really know that we can only control three things in all three things we actually want to minimize through this investment system the first thing we can minimize or reduce is how much tax you pay when investing we had a a client who was not a client of streamline Financial but of a tax firm coming to the the CPA firm in March to pick up his tax return and he was completely surprised that he had sixty thousand dollars of extra income on his tax return that he had to pay tax on right away before April 15th and it was due to the capital gains being recognized and other distributions within his investment account and he said but I didn't sell anything and the account didn't even go up that much last year and I got to pay tax on it but he was already in the highest tax bracket paying about close to 37 percent on short-term capital gains and dividends and interest so that was an unpleasant surprise and we see it happen more often than it should but this can really be avoided and here's two ways we can control tax so that we don't have to have that happen and really just control tax and pay less of it is the goal and I'll keep this at a high level but it'll get the the point across number one is the kinds of Investments that you own some are maybe funds or ETFs or individual uh equities or things like that the funds and ETFs they could pass on capital gains and and distributions to you each year without you even doing anything without you selling or or buying but it happens within the fund a lot of times now we would use funds and ETFs that are considered tax efficient so that our clients they can decide when to recognize gains rather than letting the fund company decide now the second way is by using a strategy that's called tlh each year there's many many fluctuations or big fluctuations that happen in an investment account and the strategy that we call tlh that allows our clients that's tax loss harvesting it allows them to sell an investment that may be down for part of the year and then move it into a very similar investment right away so that the investment strategy stays the same and they can actually take a write-off on that loss on their taxes that year now there's some rules around this again we're going high level but it offsets uh you know for that one client who are not a client but who had the big sixty thousand dollars of income he could have been offsetting those capital gains by doing tlh or tax loss harvesting that strategy has really saved hundreds and thousands of of dollars for clients over a period of years so on to the next thing that we can control in our investment plan and that's cost this one's easier but many advisors they don't do it because it ends up paying them less now since we're certified financial planner professionals we do follow the fiduciary standard and we're obligated to do what's best for our clients so tell me this if you had two Investments and they had the exact same strategy the same Returns the same risk and the same tax efficiency would you rather want the one that costs 0.05 percent per year or the one that costs 12 times more at point six percent well I know that answer is obvious and we'd go with a lower cost funds if it was all the same low-cost funds and ETFs that's how we can really help reduce the cost or that's how you can help reduce the cost in your investment plan because every basis point or part of a percentage that's saved in cost it's added to your return each year and this adds up to a lot over time now the last thing that we want to minimize and control is risk and we already talked about the flaws of investing solely based on on risk tolerance and when it comes to risk a lot of people think that term risk tolerance you know how much risk can we on a scale of one to ten where are we on the the risk factor but there's another way to look at risk in your investment strategy and like King Solomon we believe that there's a season for everything or like the if it was the bird song There's a season for everything and we also believe that there's four different seasons in investing and depending on what season we're in some Investments perform better than others and the Four Seasons are pull it up right now it's higher than expected inflation which we might be feeling but there's also a season that can be lower than expected or deflation and then there's higher than expected economic growth or lower than expected economic growth and the goal is reduce the risk in investing by making sure that we're prepared for each and every one of those potential Seasons because there are individual asset classes that tend to do well during each one of those seasons and we don't know nobody knows what's really going to happen you know people would would speculate and say oh it's going to be this or this or whatever might happen but we don't know for sure that's why we want to make sure we just have the asset classes in the right spots so that the income plan doesn't get impacted so the investment system combined with the income system clients don't have to worry about the movements in the market because they know they've got enough to weather any potential season I hope this has been helpful for you so far as you're thinking about your retirement if it was please subscribe or like this video so that hopefully other people can be helped as well and then I'll see you in the next one take care thank you

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