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What Retirement Income Puts You In The Top 1%

what income does it take to be in the top 1% of all retirees you'd think that'd be a relatively simple project to research turns out it wasn't so stick around and benefit from the work that I did to uncover these hardto find numbers let's go for a walk and and talk about it and you know the first thing I want to observe is that most of us probably would not recognize could not tell by the lifestyle folks that are in the top 10% of all Rey income when I get to the numbers I I think you'll you'll say okay I think I would be able to recognize people that are in the top 1% I'll give you a hint it's a it's a much bigger number than than I thought it was going to be okay and and so why is that you know why wouldn't we recognize uh the folks that are in the top 10% and it's because like a lot of things in life you know if you look at Millionaires and millionaires Lifestyles you know 70% of millionaires in America or self-made and and most of them most of us uh got there um by being you know uh uh careful with our money and and and being good Savers as as much as uh being fortunate and and receiving a a good salary along the way okay so I'm going to start off with what these numbers look like for all Americans and this is from a large data set they say it's the largest population data set uh in the world and the organization is called ipums and this is for all Americans not just retire so um to be in the top well first let's start off with median and and this is household this is household income the median household income uh in the United States for for everybody all ages is is $70,000 to be in the top 25% you've got to make about $130,000 000 to be in the top 10% you're making a little over $200,000 the household income a little over 200,000 it's 212,000 and to be in the top 1% you're making over $500,000 a year now um and the number is 570,000 what was interesting is each of those groups from um 2021 to 2022 so this is a data set uh that they released the results of at the end of 2022 each of those groups got a raise between 2021 and 2022 unfortunately from the median and Below on an inflation adjusted basis folks that are at the median below uh are actually making less on an inflation adjusted basis folks that are above the median are making more in 20122 and we've heard this play out in the press okay so so those are the income levels now now let's talk about savings and there's a really interesting point I want to I want to share with you here okay to be in the um to be in the top 1% of Savers in the United States this is the top 1% if you're between 65 and 69 75 and 79 or over 80 it's to be in the top 1% you've got to have $2.7 million in what's called net worth the net worth is just take all of your assets all of your savings accounts the value if you own a house the value of your house and subtract from it the the the debt that you have on that essentially so you just take all of your assets and you subtract all your liabilities your car loan your your mortgage your credit card debt hopefully you don't have too many of the latter too uh and that's your net worth so um if you have a net worth of $2.7 million a household net worth uh in the United States you're in the top 1% what I want to point out is you know if you look at the income boy that income is really staggering right I mean the top 1% of income is 570,000 or higher and you know some people will say well you know that number seemed a little low I was expecting that top 1% of income to be higher and I I agree but that's like the last person that made it into the top 1% so there's plenty of people in that category that are making a lot more money but think about this you know the the lowest income in the top 1% is almost $600,000 right it's $570,000 yet to be the top 1% in savings you just need $2.7 million or more um and what that tells me is you know as a society as a country it's no surprise we're not saving enough money and so um it's not enough to make a great salary you've got to be able to to save it but to me that was just staggering that you know essentially that top 1% you know if they were the Savers they essentially have saved um what five years worth of income uh and most of us could not retire if we had just saved five years worth of income right so that just shows just the the importance of living below your means and and saving as much as you can okay let's keep going now I'm going to Break It Out by desile and again this is household and this is according to the Congressional research service so the the lower quintile so there's five groups the lower 1 the lower 20% of Americans are making under $22,000 a year then the next group up from that are making you know between that 22,000 and 40,000 the next group up to that is is making between 40,000 and 65,000 um so you can see that you know 80% of Americans households are making less than $65,000 a year now I haven't got to retirement that's coming up here really soon um let me get to the top quintile the top quintile households in America are a little over $110,000 let's call it $111,000 okay so now let's get to what I finally was able to find out so I've shared a lot of information here and I think many of you are listening to this this uh these numbers and saying you know what I'm doing okay you know it's hard to get that high high salary but if you're saving and if if you're uh spending less than you earn if you're saving that and then importantly if you're investing that remember it's not enough to just save you have to invest it you have to get compounding working for you so a lot of you I think are looking at the at least the savings number and saying yeah we're doing okay we're doing okay and I hope you are I hope you are okay so now getting on to the uh uh the the top income in retirement uh and before I get there if you're enjoying this video take a quick second and hit the like button it really does help the algorithm uh find other people that this this video uh and my videos can help okay so um I'm going to break this out the top 10% the top 5% and the top 1% so people people 65 to 69 now this is people that are working and not working top 10% is 200,000 top 5% is$ 260,000 top 1% is essentially $1 million okay so that's 65 to 69 and now for people 70 to 74 numbers come down a little bit top 10% is $170,000 top 5% uh is $26 is that right yeah 265,000 and the last number is a million dollar so retirees to be in the top 1% of all people 65 and older you need to be making a million dollars a year just to put that in perspective that rule of 25 if that's what the uh if that's what the income is then they had they'd have to have $25 million in savings by the the rule of 4% I hope you found this video helpful if you did I know you're going to like this video up here that talks about average income for retirees in America and this video down here that talks about five reasons to retire as soon as you can thanks for watching bye-bye

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RETIREMENT PLANNING TIPS FOR AGE 59+

Are you planning for retirement and  you're just not sure of the next step.   By the end of this video,  you will have received seven   crucial tips to help you plan for  a successful, secure retirement. To learn more about securing your retirement  and all the different elements you need to know,   subscribe to our channel and hit the bell so  you'll be notified of every episode posted on   Mondays. We have helped hundreds of our clients  with these exact seven tips on planning for   their retirement, and they tell us they've never  been more confident about their retirement plan.   Now it's your turn. Let's dive in. Tip number one, understand your spending. This  is really important. Now, what you do not want   to do here is to think about what your salary is  currently, while you're working.

You want to think   about what is your bring home pay after you've put  money in your 401(k), after you've been able to   pay health insurance, or whatever that might be,  that comes out of your paycheck. Think what comes   home on a monthly basis. Now, do you save any of  that money that goes into your savings account   at the bank? Take that out. What we really want  to know is how much do you actually spend every   month? By the way, if you have a mortgage or some  payment that's going to go away by the time you   retire, subtract that.

That will let you know what  your spending will be when you're in retirement. Tip number two, break income needs into three  different areas. You have your essential needs,   your wants, and then your giveaway money. It  may seem simple, but it's really important   to understand what those actually are. Your  essential needs are the basics, paying the bills,   keeping the lights on, staying  fed, staying relatively happy.   Your wants are going to be things that you want  to do. I know we work hard to get to retirement,   we don't want to give up our wants so we  want to plan for those as well. Things like   having that membership to a golf club or a  health club, being able to travel in retirement,   so being able to take those vacations  that you've been looking forward to. Being able to spoil your grandkids or family  members. These are all wants that we want to   have planned into the budget for retirement. And  then the last is giveaway money. So whether you   want to be gifting throughout retirement or  whether you want to be donating to charity,   or whether you just want to have a plan in place  for what you're going to leave behind, that   really comes into the giveaway money.

So three  major topics, when it comes to your expenses,   your essential income needs, your  wants, and then your giveaway money. Tip number three, list all of your guaranteed  income that will be there after you retire.   Now, it's really important now that you  understand it needs to be guaranteed. So   what are we talking about? Well, that's  going to be things like social security,   a pension, if you have one, or  if you've secured an annuity.   It's really important that they be guaranteed  because this part of your income plan is what's   going to help take care of those essential needs  in retirement. You do not want to count things   like rent or dividends. While they're nice and  they might be secure, they're not guaranteed.

Tip number four, don't rely on the 4% rule. You  may be asking yourself, what is the 4% rule?   Well, very simply, it's basically saying you  can take out 4% of your assets. So for example,   let's say by the time you get to retirement,  you've accumulated a million dollars. 4% of that   is $40,000. The rule, and this is a rule of thumb  by the way, the rule says that you could live off   of $40,000 a year for the rest of your life and be  okay.

Now, we see a couple of flaws in this rule. What if you're invested in  the market and your million   falls because of market volatility. So go to a  2008 scenario where the average investor loss,   anywhere from 30 to 50%. What if you  lost 50%? Now your million is 500,000.   Are you still going to be able to withdraw 40,000  a year to keep up with your living expenses?   Probably not. So that is something that's  very important that we realize that we   cannot rely on the 4% rule and we need a plan  that is structured for our specific situation. Comment below and let us know, what is your  biggest retirement planning question? Tip   number five, make a list of all of the different  types of accounts you have. Now, why are we saying   types of accounts? What does that even  mean? Well, you're going to want to list,   do you have a 401(k), 403(b), a traditional IRA,  a Roth IRA, or a brokerage account or a savings   account in the bank? You want to list all of  those account types and the reason why is because   they get taxed differently.

And so when you're  building out your retirement income plan, taxes   are extremely important. So make sure you make  a list of all the different types of accounts. Tip number six, consider how you feel about  investing during retirement. Let's talk about   this, how would you feel if you lost 10% of  your entire retirement nest egg? Well, when I   say 10% and you may say, "Well, that doesn't feel  like much." But let's put it to a dollar amount.   Let's say you have a million dollars saved up and  you lose 10% of that.

Well, that's a $100,000.   That may feel a bit more than just saying 10%,  right? So let's think about that. When you're   working and you're putting money into these  retirement plans, like a 401(k), typically you   started young and you set up an allocation that's  probably pretty aggressive, and you just set it   and forget it. You're putting money in and it's  making money, you don't really think about it.

But then you get down the line closer to  retirement, and you're still invested that way   when you should be considering your risk exposure  more and more, as you get closer to retirement.   So that's something that we have to think  about as we are transitioning into this phase.   Now, what we talk about is, you got to know  your risk tolerance and you got to understand   how you're currently invested. So many times when  we talk to people, they come in the door and they   don't even realize how much risk they have  on their overall portfolio. So that's why we   talk about always looking at alternatives that  are going to fit your investment personality. Tip number seven, don't overly worry about the  question, do I have enough to retire? Well,   why did we say that? Well, we have clients that  have a few 100,000 and we have clients that have   a few million dollars. And sometimes clients  that have a few million dollars do not have   as good of a plan as the person who has a few  100,000.

Why is that? Well, if you're spending   so much money that you're draining your accounts  too rapidly, you're at a threat to run out of   money, no matter how much you have. So what's  the bigger issue? Our spending plan. We need to   really understand how we're spending money and how  that's going to play out throughout retirement. So, as you're thinking about your retirement,  focus on your spending plan, more than being   worried about, do I have enough to retire? Well,  that's our seven tips to help you get started   down the path to secure your retirement, but what  else is needed? Well, there's a lot of different   moving parts when it comes to planning for,  and living through retirement. We have created   a mini video series called Four Steps to Secure  Your Retirement. These videos walk you through   step-by-step so that you will know exactly what  you need to do to secure your retirement. We also   have a podcast called Secure Your Retirement. You  can subscribe to our podcast with the link below.

For more detailed retirement tips, watch these  videos, create your retirement income plan,   investing during retirement, buy and hold or  active management. If you like this video,   hit the like button and be sure to  subscribe and share it with your friends.
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The $65,000 Roth IRA Mistake To Avoid

– I've seen too many of
you making some mistakes when it comes to investing
in your Roth IRA. One of them could cost you
$65,000 and the other one could cost you almost $500,000. You guys are seriously going
to make my beard turn more gray than it already is if
you don't knock it off. So let me show you what to watch out for, that way, you don't lose more money than you have to and
I can save a few bucks on hair dye for a couple more years. A Roth IRA is a self-directed
retirement account where you can contribute after
tax dollars to be invested. Since the money going in is taxed, the growth of your investments are not taxed and the money withdrawal from the account are never taxed either, as long as you don't try to pull out some of the money before the age of 59.5. There is no such thing
as a joint Roth IRA. So if you and your spouse
want to contribute to one, then you'll have to do it individually, hence the name Individual
Retirement Account.

If you both have enough
earned income separately, then you can each invest up to the $6500 limit for the year. If one of you works and the other doesn't, but you file a joint tax return, then the person working can, of course, contribute to a Roth IRA and
your spouse can contribute to a Spousal Roth IRA as well. Remember, these accounts are
owned by the individual person and on paper, not co-owned by both people. I want to try to encourage you to max out your Roth IRA every single year, if possible, because if you
don't do it for that year, then in the future you
cannot go back and contribute for a previous year once that time limit has passed. A Roth IRA is one of those accounts where I would bend over backwards to make sure that I can
put in the full amount allowed every single year.

In my order of operations for
what to do with your money, I have maxing out a Roth
IRA right after investing up to your employer match and HSA. That is how important
this type of account is. The good news with this
is that you actually have a timeframe of 16
months to contribute for each calendar year. So if we are in 2023
right now, then you have from January 1st, 2023, up until
when taxes need to be filed for that year to contribute,
which in this case, would be April 15th, 2024. That's how it is every single year, so ignore the actual dates in my example and pay more attention to the timeframes since the date taxes are due
will change by a few days from year to year. Most brokerages will ask
you which year you want to contribute to. For example, I personally
invest using M1 Finance, which you can check out down
in the description below, and also get a deposit bonus as well.

If I contributed to my Roth
IRA through them right now, then they would ask if I wanted the money to go towards 2022 or 2023, since at the time of recording this, we haven't hit the date
where taxes are due. This is great because it
gives you some extra time beyond the current year to
contribute Roth IRA money for that year. Before I tell you the next mistake that I see way too many people making, please help support my dog Molly by hitting that thumbs up
button and sharing this video with anyone you think it would help. Once you deposit money into your Roth IRA, there's one more extremely important step you need to do that I see a ton of people missing, and that is
actually investing the money.

I can't tell you how
many people I've talked to over the years who just put money into the account assuming
it would automatically grow, or knowing that they
needed to invest the money, but just forgetting to do
it because life happens, and things naturally slip out of our mind, only to check their account
balance years later, realizing that it hasn't grown in value because they didn't invest the money. Stop the nonsense here and
just set up auto investing within your investment account, and if you're waiting because you think that you can time the market
to buy in at a lower price, you can't, because it's
nearly impossible to do, so just to get the money
invested right now. If you know how you want to
invest the money, then great. If you don't, then I personally
like the two fund portfolio for people who are in
the accumulation phase of investing and in the
three fund portfolio for when you're closer to
retirement or in retirement.

I'll have a link to a
playlist then I made just for you where I teach you
about both of those portfolios down in the description below
and above my head as well. When you contribute to a Roth IRA, all of your money is not
locked up until 59.5. You can withdraw the
contributions that you've made before that age without paying a penalty, but you cannot withdraw any of
the gains within the account. For example, if you've contributed $6500 and the account has grown to $10,000, then you can withdraw
the $6500 contribution, but you cannot touch the $3500 gain without paying a penalty until 59.5. I've gotta interject for a second to give my personal opinion on this.

While withdrawing money
penalty-free is an option, I want to encourage you not to do this. To be brutally honest, I think that doing this
is one of the dumbest, most irresponsible, short-sighted
things that you can do. Withdrawing just $6500
worth of contributions would cost you $65,000 in
future investment growth. So when any money is
taken out of this account before retirement, think
about how it's actually going to cost you 7,800 Chipotle burritos, or 65 new Apple iPhones, or anything else that you would buy for that amount of money. And yes, I am fully aware
that you can do a penalty-free early withdrawal up to
$10,000 before the age of 59.5 for a first time home purchase. But this is just as stupid as withdrawing your contributions early
because that $10,000 is costing you over $100,000
in future investment growth when you pull that money out. Average annual home appreciation over the past 12 years has been 6.11%, and the US stock market
has returned 12.27%. Leave your money in the freaking Roth IRA and go earn that $10,000 that
you need to buy the home. Responsible investing takes time, like five or 10-plus years, and this money needs time to grow. The second you withdraw
any of your contributions, you are cutting down that tree before it even has a chance to grow fruit.

Once you withdraw
contributions from the past, you cannot replace that
money in the future. I get that emergencies happen in life, so that's why you need
to have money set aside in an emergency fund to
pay for those things. Do not, under 99.999% of circumstances, use your Roth IRA money for anything other than when you retire. One thing I see way too many people doing is investing in a
taxable brokerage account before they have their Roth
IRA maxed out for the year. This is a huge mistake from a tax savings
perspective for some of you because of how each account is taxed. With a Roth IRA, you invest with money
that's already been taxed, so the money can grow tax-free
and be withdrawn tax-free. With a taxable brokerage
account, you are paying taxes for the ongoing dividend
distributions every single year. Then you have to pay capital gains tax when you go to withdraw the money. Since the money within
a Roth IRA will grow and can be withdrawn tax-free, realistically, you want
this account to get as large as possible, but not at the expense of
your personal risk tolerance.

You should not take on
additional levels of risk by investing in more
risky, unprofitable stocks that random YouTubers have been pumping over the past few years or actively manage funds to
try to achieve higher returns. 99% of people, including
myself, cannot handle investing in something with a
high risk and potential, potential, high return. So don't even bother. The money in this account
is for retirement, so is it really worth it to risk that 60-year-old's financial wellbeing because you decided to gamble with their money right now? I doubt it.

Some of you might be over
the income limit to be able to contribute to a Roth IRA, or some of you will be at
that point in the future as your income grows. You can still contribute to a Roth IRA to take advantage of the tax-free growth by doing a backdoor Roth. To simply explain the process,
all you do is contribute to a traditional IRA. Do not invest the money yet. Then contact your brokerage
to have them convert the money to a Roth IRA. Now, I have done it with M1 Finance before and it was extremely easy. It only took I think two or three days for the money to get into my Roth IRA. Only do this if it makes sense based on your current tax rates
and future financial plans.

There's two things that you can do. if you are someone who thinks that you might be over the income limit, but you are not going to 100%
know until the year is over. Number one, you can
either wait until January of the following year,
like we talked about in one of the previous mistakes that
I mentioned, or number two, you can just contribute the
money to a traditional IRA, then do a backdoor Roth within
the year to get the money into the account so it can be invested. That way, if you are
over the income limit, you've already done the backdoor Roth. If you're under the income limit, no big deal 'cause you had to pay taxes on that money that was going
into the Roth IRA anyways. A question I get a lot is
whether or not you can contribute to a Roth IRA on different brokerages.

The simple answer is yes. This is how it would play out. You can contribute up to the max for one year
on, say, M1 Finance. Then you can decide to contribute up to the max on fidelity the next year. Then you can contribute up to the max on Vanguard the following year. So by the end of that third year, you would have three different Roth IRAs with three different brokerages, and there is no problem with that. You can take it one step further. If you decide, hey, out of these three, I actually like M1 finance
better than the other two, you can convert the
Roth IRAs with Fidelity and Vanguard into your
M1 Finance Roth IRA. You can also split up your contribution for the same year among
different brokerages. So if for this year you want
to say contribute $4,000 to an M1 Finance Roth IRA and the remaining $2,500
into a Fidelity Roth IRA, then you can do that without any problems.

The only thing you
cannot do is try to game the system by saying contributing $6500 into an M1 Finance Roth IRA and $6500 into a Roth IRA with another brokerage. You cannot exceed the maximum
amount allowed per year across all of your Roth IRAs on all of your brokerage accounts. Technically, you could do that since all of the brokerages aren't talking
to each other to keep track of what you are contributing, so you have to self-manage this. I would highly, highly recommend making sure
that you do not do this, whether it's on purpose or on accident. I don't know what the penalty is for this, but all I know is that you do
not want to get caught trying to defraud the government
in any way, shape, or form. Long-term investing is the name
of the game with a Roth IRA. This money is for when
you are in retirement, so make sure to take that into account when investing this money. No gambling it on stocks
that random YouTubers are promoting. I think the two or three fund portfolio is perfect for your Roth IRA, which you can learn more about
in these videos to your left.

There's a bunch of free stocks and resources down in
the description below to help with all of your personal finance and investing needs. I'll see you in the next one, friends, go..

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401K to Gold IRA Rollover

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Your Tell-All Guide to Saving for Retirement

I'm Britt, the co-founder of Dow Janes, and 
every single week I have someone asked me   how they can start saving for retirement 
or how much they need or if it's too late   to start saving. Today, I'm going to share my 
top tips for starting to save for retirement.   And don't worry; it's easier than you think.
If you want more ideas for saving, investing,   and making the most of your money, 
don't forget to hit the subscribe button   and the bell so you don't miss any new 
videos. And if you liked this video,   definitely give it a thumbs up.
All right. So, there are some misconceptions   about retirement saving that I want to address. 
First, one thing people often ask us is how much   do I need for retirement? What's the magic number? 
And the truth is it varies widely.

It depends on   where you want to live or what lifestyle you 
want to have or when you want to retire. Are   you trying to retire at 40 or at 70?0.
If you take anything away from today, I want   you to just start saving 20% of your pre-tax 
income for your retirement, and you'll be fine.   To learn more though, keep listening.
Okay. So how do you start saving for   retirement? What you do is you follow the roadmap 
steps. You make sure you're doing things in the   right order. So we have a whole nother video 
on the roadmap steps, but just to recap,   the first thing you want to do is make sure 
you're spending less than you make each month.
  The second thing is to pay off any 
high-interest rate debt you have, which is   anything with an interest rate over 7%, then 
you want to build up an emergency fund.

And   then once you have those three things in place, 
you're ready to start saving for retirement.   So, to do that, you're going to find your monthly 
savings number. You can use a simple retirement   calculator to figure out how much you want to have 
in retirement. I'll link to one in the description   below. What you'll do is you'll add in your 
current savings, anything you've already saved   for retirement already, anything you expect to get 
from social security, and then you'll adjust the   savings amount to see exactly how much you need 
to save each month to be on track, to meet your   retirement goals. It's a super easy calculator, 
you just enter the numbers. It'll spit out exactly   what you need to do, and that number, that savings 
amount, that's going to be your monthly goal.
  So, if you don't already have an account, 
you'll open up a retirement account,   and that's where you'll begin to transfer that 
savings amount to that account each month.
  Where should you save your money? There are 
different types of retirement accounts.

So,   if your employer offers matching, then you'll 
want to open a 401(k) or 403(b). In addition,   you can open a Roth IRA or a traditional IRA. 
IRA stands for Individual Retirement Account.   If you're self-employed, you can also open a SEP 
IRA. So for the Roth traditional or SEP IRAs,   you can open those at any brokerage places 
like Vanguard, Charles Schwab, Fidelity,   or with a robo-advisor like Wealthfront or 
Betterment. Any of those places offer retirement   accounts. So, it's super easy to get started. 
Then if your employer offers 401(k) matching,   you definitely want to advantage of that.
So, what is 401(k) matching? It's when you   save money for your retirement and your company 
contributes the same amount that you save.   They'll often match up to a certain amount 
or a certain percentage of your salary.
  So, if your company matches 4% of your 
salary and you make $5,000 per month,   you could contribute $200 per month towards your 
retirement, and your company would contribute an   additional $200 per month.

So you basically get 
$200 in retirement money for free each month.
  It's a way for companies to incentivize 
their employees to save for retirement.   So, if your employer offers this, definitely take 
advantage of it. It's the easiest free money out   there. And make sure you're contributing the 
maximum amount that they're willing to match.
  Okay. The next thing you'll do, if your employer 
doesn't offer matching, or if you're, um, if   you've already maxed that out, the next thing 
you want to do is max out your contribution to   your Roth or your traditional IRA. So, each year, 
the IRS limits the amount that you're allowed to   contribute. In 2021, the amount is $6,000.
If you're over 50, you have an extra bonus. You   can contribute $7,000. So, try to contribute the 
maximum amount to those accounts each year. So,   max out your 401(k) to where your company matches 
max out your Roth or your traditional IRA. If   you're self-employed, you could also contribute to 
your SEP IRA. If you're a great saver and you're   saving more than those amounts, you can open 
your own brokerage account.

So, a non-retirement   account, and save the money there. You can use 
that money for whatever you want, but you can   know that you're saving that for retirement.
Once you've saved the money in those accounts,   what you're going to do is invest that savings. So 
for the easiest and simplest way to get invested,   you'll invest in target date funds. These 
are pre-made portfolios that allocate your   money to a mix of stocks and bonds that 
are appropriate based on your age.
  If you want to invest in index funds yourself, 
or if you're picking a fund that your employer   offers, then you can use these rules of thumb. 
Generally, you want your portfolio to be invested   in the percentage of stocks that is equal to 
120 minus your age.

So if you're 20 or younger,   you want to have 100% of your portfolio 
in stocks. If you're 30, you want 90%   in stocks, for example. And just a quick 
note that if you invest in target date funds,   that will do that for you. The allocation 
changes the allocation of stocks and bonds   changes over time as you get older.
One quick thing to know is that you   actually don't need to take your money, your 
retirement money, out the year that you retire.   You can leave it invested while you're in 
retirement and just take out what you need,   which means you actually have more time 
than you think for your money to grow.
  So, hopefully that gives you some peace of mind. 
If you're getting started later in the game,   if you're wondering how much you should be 
saving in retirement savings each month,   we have a couple of rules of thumb for you.

And 
the bottom line is the sooner you start saving for   retirement, the less you actually have to save, 
because if you start sooner and you invest that   money, it will grow and it will grow over a longer 
period of time. If you're starting later in life,   you have to save more because it has less 
time to grow. So, if you're in your twenties,   you can save 15% of your pre-tax income each 
month and you'll be set. If you're starting   in your thirties, you want to save 20% of your 
pre-tax income. If you don't have anything saved   and you're just starting to save for retirement in 
your forties or your fifties, you'll need to save   even more since you're starting later and your 
money has less time to grow. If this is you, watch   out for our next video on how to start saving 
for retirement if you're in your fifties.
  All right, the sooner you start saving for 
retirement, the easier it is.

So, here's a recap   of the steps: One, follow our wealth building 
roadmap, so you know what to do in what order.   Two, find your monthly savings. Number three, open 
a retirement account. Four, take advantage of free   money. Five, max out your contributions. Six, 
invest your retirement savings, and seven,   contribute to your retirement savings each 
month. If you want to learn more about how   to build your wealth and invest your retirement 
savings, then definitely check out our webinar,   Think Like an Investor. The link's in the comment 
below.

All right. Thanks for watching..

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3 MASSIVE Ways To Help Your Money Last Longer In Retirement

Retirement is supposed to be stress-free! 
you're enjoying life you step away from all   of the nonsense of the workplace and all of the 
frustration and you're enjoying your life you're   sitting on the beach just chilling having a good 
time it's all good but there's one stressor that   I see with so many people that are retired 
and that's making your money last the markets   aren't easy to watch you're going to open up 
your accounts and one day you're up you know   $100,000 if you've got a million dollar you know 
10% gain is $100,000 but then if you have a 10%   loss that year you're down $100,000 that's hard 
to stomach when you've built you worked so hard   for all of this money for so long well we've got 
to figure out how to make your money last even   in a bad market so let's take a look here let's 
look at retired Roger I built this out with Nest   eg a software we use for clients here at Jazz 
Wealth and if we're looking Roger looks great   right this second he's got a 92% probability of 
success of having about $11 million at the end   of his life he's 61 years old he plans to live on 
5,100 a year he's got $800,000 little bits 25% of   that is in WTH the rest of it's in pre-tax just 
to give you a breakdown of where he's at so if   we're looking here he's planning to take Social 
Security at 70 he's actually not and I'll show   you a minute Ro Roger's one of those he's like 
ah my dad died early I I think I'm healthier but   I'm not giving that money to the government that 
that was my Roger voice if you didn't catch that   so if we're looking here and we say Okay Roger's 
going to take Social Security early all right well   perfect well let's go ahead and do that so we're 
going to make this adjustment here and we're going   to say he's going to take it early it gives him 
about a you know 5% probability less here though   you're not talking them big difference in money I 
mean $32,000 roughly $33,000 is the difference so   it's not a significant ific difference but what 
happens if the market has a massive pullback if   we see a massive pullback that's what we've got 
to look at here with Roger and figure out what is   best for his scenario now if we go right here 
and we say the markets the equity markets Dro   30% he's going to go down to 64% well personally 
as a planner I'm looking at 64% of probability   of success you know when you're in your 70s 70% 
80% you know it's not too bad because we're also   looking at this number we're also looking 
at something else called the cash flow the   cash flow is going to show us a whole different 
scenario when it comes to this where it's really   looking at things and it's saying okay we've got 
this as far as go it goes in a linear fashion so   he's going to get you know let's say a 7% return 
on his money every single year the money's coming   in the money's going out that's what we're 
looking at there but in this the Monte Carlo   looks at a thousand scenarios and it gives us 
this probability of success it's a little more   conservative but 64% I'm not Ultra comfortable 
telling Roger hey you know take Social Security   at 62 years old the markets just fell 30% now 
you would think that that's actually backwards   because a lot of times advisers will tell you 
hey take Social Security early if the market   Falls that's the option this is where planning 
comes into play because that's not always the   best scenario and in Rogers if we look here and we 
say well you know what Roger going to take Social   Security at 70 instead there's a 30% pullback 
he's now pushing 70% again we still have about   a 5% spread on the probability of success in his 
retirement but when you're in the 60s wouldn't you   rather have a 69% than a 64% I'd much rather give 
him that information and make him do that instead   so now let's go back because there's other stuff 
that Roger wants to do Roger wants to talk about   hey you know what I want to be really aggressive 
with my money and rightfully so if I'm looking   at this plan here and I look here at Roger let's 
get this back going he's sitting here and he says   I want want this to be 100% in equities and here 
is why I'm going to potentially have $2 million   at the end of my life that I can leave my kids 
versus 1.1 million and look here it's only a 1%   probability difference now you're probably saying 
well why is there a 1% Less in having $2 million   the reason for that is if you're investing in 
the stocks this probability of success and the   way this looks at it the Monte Carlo is saying 
there's 29 years of Rogers life still to cover   that's you know until age 90 looking at that 
specific scenario in his life there's 29 years   of Market return projections this gets a little 
bit risky if everything's 100% in the stock market   versus if you have a little bit of bonds or maybe 
some currently money market fund sitting in there   you're not just overly saturated just in the most 
aggressive portfolio that you can be and so in his   scenario though he wants to leave this money 
and he's looking at that well let's go ahead   and take a look now and let's see what this could 
look like now remember if he were to take Social   Security at 70 and the current allocation which 
is about a 6040 mix for his scenario here he would   have a 69.6 probability of success well remember 
he's got you know a lot of opportunity here he's   wanting to leave his kids $900,000 more if he gets 
aggressive but what happens if he gets aggressive   and then the market pulls back you're talking 
60% probability 9% difference 60% probability   of success I'm not comfortable again telling Roger 
hey man this is where you need to be so you've got   to think through not just what today is coming 
up with when it comes to your financial plan and   your retirement you've got to really think through 
the stress factors the stress test of what happens   when the market Falls because ultimately the 
markets will go down that's just an unfortunate   scenario that's going to happen if you look dayto 
day the markets go up the markets go down and   historically they've always appreciated or went 
up but in the short term there will be downfalls   there and so one other thing we got to look look 
at though is if you were wanting to make a big   purchase because remember we're wanting to make 
your retirement dollars last so what happens if   you're wanting to make a large purchase in a down 
Market well remember Roger had $800,000 well let's   just say that you know a 30% pullback would give 
him a lot a lot less money let's just say that   we have a little bit of a pullback and Rogers 
money is now $750,000 and he makes a purchase   he had $800,000 he made a $50,000 purchase well 
the next year when the market recovers Roger's   going to have 82,500 on a 7% return so you know 
eventually the markets fall they will start to   recover it's all about delaying the purchase and 
let me show you exactly why if you were to wait   for the recovery to happen and Roger says I've 
got $800,000 once the market recovers I'm back   to my break even here I get a 7% return I make a 
$5,000 purchase well he had $856,000 he's almost   got enough money to cover the taxes potentially 
depending on what tax bracket he's in and the   actual purchase that $50,000 purchase so it's 
really thinking through and trying to time when   you're in a down Market trying to time when the 
right time is to make this large purchase some   people just get antsy and they say you know what 
the Market's falling I want to get out of it I'm   going to go ahead and buy the car now or buy 
the the house or the RV in retirement because   I don't even know if my money's going to be there 
well that's not the best decision because you're   making an emotional decision so instead you want 
to make sure that you're removing the motion out   you're looking look at a financial plan you're 
not just looking at one scenario but you're really   starting to think through this to determine what 
is going to be best for you thanks for watching   if you want to learn more about jazzwealth 
and how we can help as fiduciary advisers go   to Jazzwealth.com if you want more educational 
content be sure to check out our videos here

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Is a Retirement Bucket Strategy Right for You?

Making your money last in retirement can be tricky, so it's worth asking if a bucketing strategy might help you address some of the biggest challenges you face. So in particular, we're talking about number one having the confidence to stop working and start spending. That can be terrifying even for those of you who are well prepared. You might have assets and a healthy income from social security and pensions, but still it's kind of terrifying to walk away from a job with a steady income and some nice health care. You might also need to invest at least some portion of your assets for long term growth, and that's because we all face the risk of inflation or rising prices over time.

So if your assets aren't growing then you may lose purchasing power over decades in retirement, and that can be a problem. Then a third issue is of course that sequence of returns risk, and this is when you are selling assets especially at the beginning of your retirement when markets are down, if there happens to be a crash at the beginning of your retirement years, if you're selling assets during that event it can really take a bigger bite out of your portfolio and increase the risk of you running out of money later in life, and we don't want that. So let's spend the next couple of minutes talking about retirement bucket strategies. We'll go over some examples, maybe look at how to start it and manage it over time, and then discuss if it's the right move for you. I will mention that I don't see a lot of clients using this beyond a two bucket approach, but it's still nice to know these concepts so that you can either rule it out if you're not going to use it or get some good ideas. Bucketing is also known as time segmentation.

In other words, you have different buckets of assets that you can pull from over different time frames, and the promise of this is that hopefully you would be able to avoid selling assets when they're down and you can be confident that you have the funds you need for your withdrawals and your spending. So you always have a cash bucket and this involves money that you might be spending next week or next month.

This is relatively safe money, and then beyond that you might have one or more additional buckets that are invested a bit differently, and we'll talk about that in just a minute. It's important for you to know that you can customize this in any way you want. We're just going to go over some examples that are concepts, but whether you use two buckets or three buckets or make the time frames different, maybe you want four years worth of cash for example, these are all things that you can customize to suit your preferences. One of the simplest approaches is a two bucket strategy.

So you've got just that one bucket for several years worth of spending. You might set aside enough cash to satisfy let's say one to three years worth of withdrawals if you needed to take money out of investments and you didn't want to sell investments because they're down perhaps. The second bucket is maybe a total return portfolio. It might be invested according to whatever is right for your risk preferences, your needs, and your tolerance, and you would know that given that you have some cash set aside you don't need to dip into that bucket for at least four years or so. Now keep in mind that this isn't rigid so you don't need to necessarily start by spending from your cash bucket.

If the markets are doing well and your investments are gaining value it might make sense just to spend from those investments and leave that cash bucket as is and it's there for if you ever need it. So if there is ever a market crash it is already loaded with cash that you can draw on and you can worry a lot less about what the markets are doing. So you can see some of the investments in bucket number one. These are cash equivalents basically it might even be in a savings account or CDs. You could look at T bills if you wanted and other types of things. Again this is up to you but the point is you might feel really confident if you have this money set aside. And by the way it's probably a good idea to start building up this cash bucket a few years before retirement so that once you reach day one of retirement you have this money set aside already. In the second bucket of course you have a diversified portfolio so that might be mutual funds and ETFs, maybe some individual stocks and bonds, whatever it is that you invest in according to whatever is appropriate for you as an investor.

So if that's a 60 40 for example you do that maybe you have more risk or less risk or alternatives or something else. We'll look at some deeper examples next but first I want to mention I'm Justin Pritchard and I help people plan for retirement and invest for the future, and in the description below you're going to find more information on bucketing, some resources from Christine Benz, as well as just some general retirement planning resources and information. I think you will find all of that really helpful so please check that out. And by the way it's just a friendly reminder that this is just a short video it can't possibly cover everything. You can still run out of money even if you use a bucketing strategy so triple check all of this with some professionals and be aware that there is always some risk and uncertainty in the retirement planning world. Now moving on to a three bucket example we have those same two buckets as before but we've added an income bucket so this is in between the cash withdrawal bucket and the longer term growth bucket.

You might prefer to set aside an extra bucket. I'm not sure that you necessarily need this bucket but you could include things that kick off higher levels of income perhaps longer term bonds and CDs maybe some dividend stocks if you have the appetite for that kind of risk and anything else that comes to mind that might help create some income that can go into bucket number one. If we look at this three bucket example depending on how you set it up you might have roughly or almost 10 years worth of withdrawals in relatively safe assets.

You've got a couple of years in cash so that's going to be really safe and then the income is a little bit more risk but not quite everything in the stock market like your growth bucket you could potentially pull from those assets for up to 10 years before you need to go and sell from your growth bucket and of course the past doesn't necessarily repeat, there are no guarantees but if we look historically there's a decent chance that you wouldn't be selling at least at steep losses and you might not be selling at any losses if you have a diversified portfolio over a rolling 10 year period, again can't predict the future, then if you really wanted to you could add more buckets but that really gets complicated, and speaking of complicated, let's get into bucket maintenance or bucket management.

This is really where you start to see some cracks in getting too complicated with this strategy or using too many buckets it's easy enough to design a bucket strategy in theory so you can set up the amounts you want and figure out how many years they should last and on your retirement date and in the early months you will have a lovely set of buckets, you've got the exact amount in each one and the investment mix in each one is exactly what you want, but at some point, life might happen, if you get into an extended downturn or even a flat market or if you have huge expenses that you didn't expect at some point we need to figure out how exactly you're going to be moving assets from one bucket to the next again when things are going well you're typically going to maybe just sell from those investment assets and not even use bucket number one the safe money you might just take profits off the top of whatever your growth investments are doing during the good times and meanwhile you might be sending income let's say dividends or capital gains payments over from the income and growth buckets into bucket number one and that can help to build that up or replenish it from any withdrawals that you might have taken but if you really start drawing from bucket one that safe bucket how exactly do we decide when and how to put money back in well one way is to use a systematic approach and that might be one example is going to be just every time period whether it's every six months every year you take some money out of the subsequent buckets and pull it forward into your cash bucket that can kind of defeat the purpose of bucketing because the idea is that you don't want to do things systematically you want to be more opportunistic and not just sell every six months but you want to avoid selling when investments are down to make a slight improvement on that you could look at a rebalancing strategy so you just take profits off the top of whatever did well and sell those assets and put the proceeds into bucket number one so if stocks did really well you're taking money out of stocks putting it into cash if bonds did really well and stocks suffered you would sell some bonds to get back into balance and then move that money over into the cash bucket you could also look at more opportunistic approaches and these border on market timing but you might say that maybe you have some rules you could say if something rises by more than five percent during a quarter or during a month for example you're going to sell some of that get it back down to a smaller proportion and take the sales proceeds put that into cash your bucket maintenance gets really complicated at some point especially if the markets don't behave so I would say you want to do a lot more thinking ahead and a lot more research if this is something you're considering look at some of the discussions with Christine Benz from Morningstar there are a number of those here on YouTube and she talks about that in more detail and proposes maybe some simplified ways of going about this which might take us right back to the two bucket approach really quickly how do you set this up in the first place well one way to do it is to use different accounts so your cash bucket is in cash and that might be in savings accounts CDs banks credit unions or even a conservative brokerage account then you might have your other buckets in different accounts and that way you can keep a balance of whatever the assets are in that account you can rebalance that account and the cash bucket is unaffected so it might make sense to do that but if you prefer you could do all of this in one account so for example you could have a couple of years worth of withdrawals sitting in cash or in a money market fund in a brokerage account then the subsequent money or the rest of the buckets would be in other investments inside of that same account ultimately this comes down to your preferences and what's going to be easiest for you to keep track of because that's really important you have to manage this over time it isn't just setting it up once and then letting it run you really do need to keep paying attention to it so I've hinted at some of the potential challenges here and I'm going to propose what I think is a simpler way of doing that and explain exactly why I think that but again it can be hard to manage this over time you don't always know what the next step is and so you might be kind of figuring things out and winging it as you go and that kind of defeats the purpose of setting up a structured process at the beginning if you aren't really sure what you're going to do with it as the years pass this can also be a cash heavy approach so you might have several years worth of withdrawals sitting in cash and that's not necessarily a bad idea but for some people given how everything is set up that can potentially mean that they don't have much that is invested for longer term growth so you want to think about that as you explore all of this and of course there are no guarantees so there could be extended draw downs that cause you to wipe out one bucket then the next and then get right into those growth assets selling exactly when you don't want to sell you can still have problems with this approach so what are some decent alternatives to bucketing you're obviously looking for a solution that can provide some peace of mind and give you a reasonable path forward as you figure out how to spend down the assets that you have one solution might be total return investing and that's where you just have a diversified portfolio that is tailored to your needs it has the right risk level and then a cash reserve so basically we're just talking about two buckets here if you want to look at it that way you've got a couple of years let's say worth of money in cash that can satisfy withdrawals during market downturns and the rest of it is invested I think you'll find that this functions similarly to what everybody thinks about as a bucket strategy so what you're doing with that approach is you want to keep the portfolio in balance so a couple of options number one is you can just sell what's been doing well and generate cash that's kind of like what we were talking about with bucketing or you might keep the portfolio in balance every six months for example or when it gets out of different tolerance ranges you might get it back into balance but effectively you're still selling your winners there and then putting it into the portfolio balance and then whenever you want to add cash you would just sell everything proportionally but you have been previously selling your winners to keep the portfolio in balance it's not exactly the same as a three bucket strategy for example but it can function somewhat similarly and another approach is to look at guardrails this is different than bucketing and looking at what to sell and when but it might be a different way to figure out exactly how much you can spend and avoid running out of money during retirement that's a topic for another video but it's something to look into if you're exploring these ideas so I hope you found this helpful if you did please leave a quick thumbs up thank you and take care.

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The $65,000 Roth IRA Mistake To Avoid

– I've seen too many of
you making some mistakes when it comes to investing
in your Roth IRA. One of them could cost you
$65,000 and the other one could cost you almost $500,000. You guys are seriously going
to make my beard turn more gray than it already is if
you don't knock it off. So let me show you what to watch out for, that way, you don't lose more money than you have to and
I can save a few bucks on hair dye for a couple more years.

A Roth IRA is a self-directed
retirement account where you can contribute after
tax dollars to be invested. Since the money going in is taxed, the growth of your investments are not taxed and the money withdrawal from the account are never taxed either, as long as you don't try to pull out some of the money before the age of 59.5. There is no such thing
as a joint Roth IRA. So if you and your spouse
want to contribute to one, then you'll have to do it individually, hence the name Individual
Retirement Account. If you both have enough
earned income separately, then you can each invest up to the $6500 limit for the year. If one of you works and the other doesn't, but you file a joint tax return, then the person working can, of course, contribute to a Roth IRA and
your spouse can contribute to a Spousal Roth IRA as well. Remember, these accounts are
owned by the individual person and on paper, not co-owned by both people.

I want to try to encourage you to max out your Roth IRA every single year, if possible, because if you
don't do it for that year, then in the future you
cannot go back and contribute for a previous year once that time limit has passed. A Roth IRA is one of those accounts where I would bend over backwards to make sure that I can
put in the full amount allowed every single year. In my order of operations for
what to do with your money, I have maxing out a Roth
IRA right after investing up to your employer match and HSA. That is how important
this type of account is. The good news with this
is that you actually have a timeframe of 16
months to contribute for each calendar year. So if we are in 2023
right now, then you have from January 1st, 2023, up until
when taxes need to be filed for that year to contribute,
which in this case, would be April 15th, 2024.

That's how it is every single year, so ignore the actual dates in my example and pay more attention to the timeframes since the date taxes are due
will change by a few days from year to year. Most brokerages will ask
you which year you want to contribute to. For example, I personally
invest using M1 Finance, which you can check out down
in the description below, and also get a deposit bonus as well. If I contributed to my Roth
IRA through them right now, then they would ask if I wanted the money to go towards 2022 or 2023, since at the time of recording this, we haven't hit the date
where taxes are due. This is great because it
gives you some extra time beyond the current year to
contribute Roth IRA money for that year.

Before I tell you the next mistake that I see way too many people making, please help support my dog Molly by hitting that thumbs up
button and sharing this video with anyone you think it would help. Once you deposit money into your Roth IRA, there's one more extremely important step you need to do that I see a ton of people missing, and that is
actually investing the money. I can't tell you how
many people I've talked to over the years who just put money into the account assuming
it would automatically grow, or knowing that they
needed to invest the money, but just forgetting to do
it because life happens, and things naturally slip out of our mind, only to check their account
balance years later, realizing that it hasn't grown in value because they didn't invest the money.

Stop the nonsense here and
just set up auto investing within your investment account, and if you're waiting because you think that you can time the market
to buy in at a lower price, you can't, because it's
nearly impossible to do, so just to get the money
invested right now. If you know how you want to
invest the money, then great. If you don't, then I personally
like the two fund portfolio for people who are in
the accumulation phase of investing and in the
three fund portfolio for when you're closer to
retirement or in retirement.

I'll have a link to a
playlist then I made just for you where I teach you
about both of those portfolios down in the description below
and above my head as well. When you contribute to a Roth IRA, all of your money is not
locked up until 59.5. You can withdraw the
contributions that you've made before that age without paying a penalty, but you cannot withdraw any of
the gains within the account. For example, if you've contributed $6500 and the account has grown to $10,000, then you can withdraw
the $6500 contribution, but you cannot touch the $3500 gain without paying a penalty until 59.5. I've gotta interject for a second to give my personal opinion on this. While withdrawing money
penalty-free is an option, I want to encourage you not to do this. To be brutally honest, I think that doing this
is one of the dumbest, most irresponsible, short-sighted
things that you can do.

Withdrawing just $6500
worth of contributions would cost you $65,000 in
future investment growth. So when any money is
taken out of this account before retirement, think
about how it's actually going to cost you 7,800 Chipotle burritos, or 65 new Apple iPhones, or anything else that you would buy for that amount of money. And yes, I am fully aware
that you can do a penalty-free early withdrawal up to
$10,000 before the age of 59.5 for a first time home purchase. But this is just as stupid as withdrawing your contributions early
because that $10,000 is costing you over $100,000
in future investment growth when you pull that money out. Average annual home appreciation over the past 12 years has been 6.11%, and the US stock market
has returned 12.27%. Leave your money in the freaking Roth IRA and go earn that $10,000 that
you need to buy the home. Responsible investing takes time, like five or 10-plus years, and this money needs time to grow.

The second you withdraw
any of your contributions, you are cutting down that tree before it even has a chance to grow fruit. Once you withdraw
contributions from the past, you cannot replace that
money in the future. I get that emergencies happen in life, so that's why you need
to have money set aside in an emergency fund to
pay for those things. Do not, under 99.999% of circumstances, use your Roth IRA money for anything other than when you retire. One thing I see way too many people doing is investing in a
taxable brokerage account before they have their Roth
IRA maxed out for the year.

This is a huge mistake from a tax savings
perspective for some of you because of how each account is taxed. With a Roth IRA, you invest with money
that's already been taxed, so the money can grow tax-free
and be withdrawn tax-free. With a taxable brokerage
account, you are paying taxes for the ongoing dividend
distributions every single year. Then you have to pay capital gains tax when you go to withdraw the money.

Since the money within
a Roth IRA will grow and can be withdrawn tax-free, realistically, you want
this account to get as large as possible, but not at the expense of
your personal risk tolerance. You should not take on
additional levels of risk by investing in more
risky, unprofitable stocks that random YouTubers have been pumping over the past few years or actively manage funds to
try to achieve higher returns. 99% of people, including
myself, cannot handle investing in something with a
high risk and potential, potential, high return. So don't even bother. The money in this account
is for retirement, so is it really worth it to risk that 60-year-old's financial wellbeing because you decided to gamble with their money right now? I doubt it. Some of you might be over
the income limit to be able to contribute to a Roth IRA, or some of you will be at
that point in the future as your income grows. You can still contribute to a Roth IRA to take advantage of the tax-free growth by doing a backdoor Roth. To simply explain the process,
all you do is contribute to a traditional IRA.

Do not invest the money yet. Then contact your brokerage
to have them convert the money to a Roth IRA. Now, I have done it with M1 Finance before and it was extremely easy. It only took I think two or three days for the money to get into my Roth IRA. Only do this if it makes sense based on your current tax rates
and future financial plans. There's two things that you can do. if you are someone who thinks that you might be over the income limit, but you are not going to 100%
know until the year is over. Number one, you can
either wait until January of the following year,
like we talked about in one of the previous mistakes that
I mentioned, or number two, you can just contribute the
money to a traditional IRA, then do a backdoor Roth within
the year to get the money into the account so it can be invested.

That way, if you are
over the income limit, you've already done the backdoor Roth. If you're under the income limit, no big deal 'cause you had to pay taxes on that money that was going
into the Roth IRA anyways. A question I get a lot is
whether or not you can contribute to a Roth IRA on different brokerages. The simple answer is yes. This is how it would play out. You can contribute up to the max for one year
on, say, M1 Finance.

Then you can decide to contribute up to the max on fidelity the next year. Then you can contribute up to the max on Vanguard the following year. So by the end of that third year, you would have three different Roth IRAs with three different brokerages, and there is no problem with that. You can take it one step further. If you decide, hey, out of these three, I actually like M1 finance
better than the other two, you can convert the
Roth IRAs with Fidelity and Vanguard into your
M1 Finance Roth IRA.

You can also split up your contribution for the same year among
different brokerages. So if for this year you want
to say contribute $4,000 to an M1 Finance Roth IRA and the remaining $2,500
into a Fidelity Roth IRA, then you can do that without any problems. The only thing you
cannot do is try to game the system by saying contributing $6500 into an M1 Finance Roth IRA and $6500 into a Roth IRA with another brokerage. You cannot exceed the maximum
amount allowed per year across all of your Roth IRAs on all of your brokerage accounts. Technically, you could do that since all of the brokerages aren't talking
to each other to keep track of what you are contributing, so you have to self-manage this. I would highly, highly recommend making sure
that you do not do this, whether it's on purpose or on accident. I don't know what the penalty is for this, but all I know is that you do
not want to get caught trying to defraud the government
in any way, shape, or form.

Long-term investing is the name
of the game with a Roth IRA. This money is for when
you are in retirement, so make sure to take that into account when investing this money. No gambling it on stocks
that random YouTubers are promoting. I think the two or three fund portfolio is perfect for your Roth IRA, which you can learn more about
in these videos to your left. There's a bunch of free stocks and resources down in
the description below to help with all of your personal finance and investing needs. I'll see you in the next one, friends, go..

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Is a Retirement Bucket Strategy Right for You?

Making your money last in retirement can be tricky, so it's worth asking if a bucketing strategy might help you address some of the biggest challenges you face. So in particular, we're talking about number one having the confidence to stop working and start spending. That can be terrifying even for those of you who are well prepared. You might have assets and a healthy income from social security and pensions, but still it's kind of terrifying to walk away from a job with a steady income and some nice health care.

You might also need to invest at least some portion of your assets for long term growth, and that's because we all face the risk of inflation or rising prices over time. So if your assets aren't growing then you may lose purchasing power over decades in retirement, and that can be a problem. Then a third issue is of course that sequence of returns risk, and this is when you are selling assets especially at the beginning of your retirement when markets are down, if there happens to be a crash at the beginning of your retirement years, if you're selling assets during that event it can really take a bigger bite out of your portfolio and increase the risk of you running out of money later in life, and we don't want that. So let's spend the next couple of minutes talking about retirement bucket strategies.

We'll go over some examples, maybe look at how to start it and manage it over time, and then discuss if it's the right move for you. I will mention that I don't see a lot of clients using this beyond a two bucket approach, but it's still nice to know these concepts so that you can either rule it out if you're not going to use it or get some good ideas. Bucketing is also known as time segmentation. In other words, you have different buckets of assets that you can pull from over different time frames, and the promise of this is that hopefully you would be able to avoid selling assets when they're down and you can be confident that you have the funds you need for your withdrawals and your spending.

So you always have a cash bucket and this involves money that you might be spending next week or next month. This is relatively safe money, and then beyond that you might have one or more additional buckets that are invested a bit differently, and we'll talk about that in just a minute. It's important for you to know that you can customize this in any way you want. We're just going to go over some examples that are concepts, but whether you use two buckets or three buckets or make the time frames different, maybe you want four years worth of cash for example, these are all things that you can customize to suit your preferences. One of the simplest approaches is a two bucket strategy.

So you've got just that one bucket for several years worth of spending. You might set aside enough cash to satisfy let's say one to three years worth of withdrawals if you needed to take money out of investments and you didn't want to sell investments because they're down perhaps. The second bucket is maybe a total return portfolio. It might be invested according to whatever is right for your risk preferences, your needs, and your tolerance, and you would know that given that you have some cash set aside you don't need to dip into that bucket for at least four years or so. Now keep in mind that this isn't rigid so you don't need to necessarily start by spending from your cash bucket. If the markets are doing well and your investments are gaining value it might make sense just to spend from those investments and leave that cash bucket as is and it's there for if you ever need it. So if there is ever a market crash it is already loaded with cash that you can draw on and you can worry a lot less about what the markets are doing.

So you can see some of the investments in bucket number one. These are cash equivalents basically it might even be in a savings account or CDs. You could look at T bills if you wanted and other types of things. Again this is up to you but the point is you might feel really confident if you have this money set aside. And by the way it's probably a good idea to start building up this cash bucket a few years before retirement so that once you reach day one of retirement you have this money set aside already.

In the second bucket of course you have a diversified portfolio so that might be mutual funds and ETFs, maybe some individual stocks and bonds, whatever it is that you invest in according to whatever is appropriate for you as an investor. So if that's a 60 40 for example you do that maybe you have more risk or less risk or alternatives or something else. We'll look at some deeper examples next but first I want to mention I'm Justin Pritchard and I help people plan for retirement and invest for the future, and in the description below you're going to find more information on bucketing, some resources from Christine Benz, as well as just some general retirement planning resources and information.

I think you will find all of that really helpful so please check that out. And by the way it's just a friendly reminder that this is just a short video it can't possibly cover everything. You can still run out of money even if you use a bucketing strategy so triple check all of this with some professionals and be aware that there is always some risk and uncertainty in the retirement planning world. Now moving on to a three bucket example we have those same two buckets as before but we've added an income bucket so this is in between the cash withdrawal bucket and the longer term growth bucket. You might prefer to set aside an extra bucket. I'm not sure that you necessarily need this bucket but you could include things that kick off higher levels of income perhaps longer term bonds and CDs maybe some dividend stocks if you have the appetite for that kind of risk and anything else that comes to mind that might help create some income that can go into bucket number one.

If we look at this three bucket example depending on how you set it up you might have roughly or almost 10 years worth of withdrawals in relatively safe assets. You've got a couple of years in cash so that's going to be really safe and then the income is a little bit more risk but not quite everything in the stock market like your growth bucket you could potentially pull from those assets for up to 10 years before you need to go and sell from your growth bucket and of course the past doesn't necessarily repeat, there are no guarantees but if we look historically there's a decent chance that you wouldn't be selling at least at steep losses and you might not be selling at any losses if you have a diversified portfolio over a rolling 10 year period, again can't predict the future, then if you really wanted to you could add more buckets but that really gets complicated, and speaking of complicated, let's get into bucket maintenance or bucket management.

This is really where you start to see some cracks in getting too complicated with this strategy or using too many buckets it's easy enough to design a bucket strategy in theory so you can set up the amounts you want and figure out how many years they should last and on your retirement date and in the early months you will have a lovely set of buckets, you've got the exact amount in each one and the investment mix in each one is exactly what you want, but at some point, life might happen, if you get into an extended downturn or even a flat market or if you have huge expenses that you didn't expect at some point we need to figure out how exactly you're going to be moving assets from one bucket to the next again when things are going well you're typically going to maybe just sell from those investment assets and not even use bucket number one the safe money you might just take profits off the top of whatever your growth investments are doing during the good times and meanwhile you might be sending income let's say dividends or capital gains payments over from the income and growth buckets into bucket number one and that can help to build that up or replenish it from any withdrawals that you might have taken but if you really start drawing from bucket one that safe bucket how exactly do we decide when and how to put money back in well one way is to use a systematic approach and that might be one example is going to be just every time period whether it's every six months every year you take some money out of the subsequent buckets and pull it forward into your cash bucket that can kind of defeat the purpose of bucketing because the idea is that you don't want to do things systematically you want to be more opportunistic and not just sell every six months but you want to avoid selling when investments are down to make a slight improvement on that you could look at a rebalancing strategy so you just take profits off the top of whatever did well and sell those assets and put the proceeds into bucket number one so if stocks did really well you're taking money out of stocks putting it into cash if bonds did really well and stocks suffered you would sell some bonds to get back into balance and then move that money over into the cash bucket you could also look at more opportunistic approaches and these border on market timing but you might say that maybe you have some rules you could say if something rises by more than five percent during a quarter or during a month for example you're going to sell some of that get it back down to a smaller proportion and take the sales proceeds put that into cash your bucket maintenance gets really complicated at some point especially if the markets don't behave so I would say you want to do a lot more thinking ahead and a lot more research if this is something you're considering look at some of the discussions with Christine Benz from Morningstar there are a number of those here on YouTube and she talks about that in more detail and proposes maybe some simplified ways of going about this which might take us right back to the two bucket approach really quickly how do you set this up in the first place well one way to do it is to use different accounts so your cash bucket is in cash and that might be in savings accounts CDs banks credit unions or even a conservative brokerage account then you might have your other buckets in different accounts and that way you can keep a balance of whatever the assets are in that account you can rebalance that account and the cash bucket is unaffected so it might make sense to do that but if you prefer you could do all of this in one account so for example you could have a couple of years worth of withdrawals sitting in cash or in a money market fund in a brokerage account then the subsequent money or the rest of the buckets would be in other investments inside of that same account ultimately this comes down to your preferences and what's going to be easiest for you to keep track of because that's really important you have to manage this over time it isn't just setting it up once and then letting it run you really do need to keep paying attention to it so I've hinted at some of the potential challenges here and I'm going to propose what I think is a simpler way of doing that and explain exactly why I think that but again it can be hard to manage this over time you don't always know what the next step is and so you might be kind of figuring things out and winging it as you go and that kind of defeats the purpose of setting up a structured process at the beginning if you aren't really sure what you're going to do with it as the years pass this can also be a cash heavy approach so you might have several years worth of withdrawals sitting in cash and that's not necessarily a bad idea but for some people given how everything is set up that can potentially mean that they don't have much that is invested for longer term growth so you want to think about that as you explore all of this and of course there are no guarantees so there could be extended draw downs that cause you to wipe out one bucket then the next and then get right into those growth assets selling exactly when you don't want to sell you can still have problems with this approach so what are some decent alternatives to bucketing you're obviously looking for a solution that can provide some peace of mind and give you a reasonable path forward as you figure out how to spend down the assets that you have one solution might be total return investing and that's where you just have a diversified portfolio that is tailored to your needs it has the right risk level and then a cash reserve so basically we're just talking about two buckets here if you want to look at it that way you've got a couple of years let's say worth of money in cash that can satisfy withdrawals during market downturns and the rest of it is invested I think you'll find that this functions similarly to what everybody thinks about as a bucket strategy so what you're doing with that approach is you want to keep the portfolio in balance so a couple of options number one is you can just sell what's been doing well and generate cash that's kind of like what we were talking about with bucketing or you might keep the portfolio in balance every six months for example or when it gets out of different tolerance ranges you might get it back into balance but effectively you're still selling your winners there and then putting it into the portfolio balance and then whenever you want to add cash you would just sell everything proportionally but you have been previously selling your winners to keep the portfolio in balance it's not exactly the same as a three bucket strategy for example but it can function somewhat similarly and another approach is to look at guardrails this is different than bucketing and looking at what to sell and when but it might be a different way to figure out exactly how much you can spend and avoid running out of money during retirement that's a topic for another video but it's something to look into if you're exploring these ideas so I hope you found this helpful if you did please leave a quick thumbs up thank you and take care.

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The $65,000 Roth IRA Mistake To Avoid

– I've seen too many of
you making some mistakes when it comes to investing
in your Roth IRA. One of them could cost you
$65,000 and the other one could cost you almost $500,000. You guys are seriously going
to make my beard turn more gray than it already is if
you don't knock it off. So let me show you what to watch out for, that way, you don't lose more money than you have to and
I can save a few bucks on hair dye for a couple more years. A Roth IRA is a self-directed
retirement account where you can contribute after
tax dollars to be invested. Since the money going in is taxed, the growth of your investments are not taxed and the money withdrawal from the account are never taxed either, as long as you don't try to pull out some of the money before the age of 59.5.

There is no such thing
as a joint Roth IRA. So if you and your spouse
want to contribute to one, then you'll have to do it individually, hence the name Individual
Retirement Account. If you both have enough
earned income separately, then you can each invest up to the $6500 limit for the year. If one of you works and the other doesn't, but you file a joint tax return, then the person working can, of course, contribute to a Roth IRA and
your spouse can contribute to a Spousal Roth IRA as well.

Remember, these accounts are
owned by the individual person and on paper, not co-owned by both people. I want to try to encourage you to max out your Roth IRA every single year, if possible, because if you
don't do it for that year, then in the future you
cannot go back and contribute for a previous year once that time limit has passed. A Roth IRA is one of those accounts where I would bend over backwards to make sure that I can
put in the full amount allowed every single year. In my order of operations for
what to do with your money, I have maxing out a Roth
IRA right after investing up to your employer match and HSA. That is how important
this type of account is. The good news with this
is that you actually have a timeframe of 16
months to contribute for each calendar year. So if we are in 2023
right now, then you have from January 1st, 2023, up until
when taxes need to be filed for that year to contribute,
which in this case, would be April 15th, 2024.

That's how it is every single year, so ignore the actual dates in my example and pay more attention to the timeframes since the date taxes are due
will change by a few days from year to year. Most brokerages will ask
you which year you want to contribute to. For example, I personally
invest using M1 Finance, which you can check out down
in the description below, and also get a deposit bonus as well. If I contributed to my Roth
IRA through them right now, then they would ask if I wanted the money to go towards 2022 or 2023, since at the time of recording this, we haven't hit the date
where taxes are due. This is great because it
gives you some extra time beyond the current year to
contribute Roth IRA money for that year. Before I tell you the next mistake that I see way too many people making, please help support my dog Molly by hitting that thumbs up
button and sharing this video with anyone you think it would help.

Once you deposit money into your Roth IRA, there's one more extremely important step you need to do that I see a ton of people missing, and that is
actually investing the money. I can't tell you how
many people I've talked to over the years who just put money into the account assuming
it would automatically grow, or knowing that they
needed to invest the money, but just forgetting to do
it because life happens, and things naturally slip out of our mind, only to check their account
balance years later, realizing that it hasn't grown in value because they didn't invest the money. Stop the nonsense here and
just set up auto investing within your investment account, and if you're waiting because you think that you can time the market
to buy in at a lower price, you can't, because it's
nearly impossible to do, so just to get the money
invested right now.

If you know how you want to
invest the money, then great. If you don't, then I personally
like the two fund portfolio for people who are in
the accumulation phase of investing and in the
three fund portfolio for when you're closer to
retirement or in retirement. I'll have a link to a
playlist then I made just for you where I teach you
about both of those portfolios down in the description below
and above my head as well.

When you contribute to a Roth IRA, all of your money is not
locked up until 59.5. You can withdraw the
contributions that you've made before that age without paying a penalty, but you cannot withdraw any of
the gains within the account. For example, if you've contributed $6500 and the account has grown to $10,000, then you can withdraw
the $6500 contribution, but you cannot touch the $3500 gain without paying a penalty until 59.5. I've gotta interject for a second to give my personal opinion on this. While withdrawing money
penalty-free is an option, I want to encourage you not to do this.

To be brutally honest, I think that doing this
is one of the dumbest, most irresponsible, short-sighted
things that you can do. Withdrawing just $6500
worth of contributions would cost you $65,000 in
future investment growth. So when any money is
taken out of this account before retirement, think
about how it's actually going to cost you 7,800 Chipotle burritos, or 65 new Apple iPhones, or anything else that you would buy for that amount of money. And yes, I am fully aware
that you can do a penalty-free early withdrawal up to
$10,000 before the age of 59.5 for a first time home purchase. But this is just as stupid as withdrawing your contributions early
because that $10,000 is costing you over $100,000
in future investment growth when you pull that money out. Average annual home appreciation over the past 12 years has been 6.11%, and the US stock market
has returned 12.27%.

Leave your money in the freaking Roth IRA and go earn that $10,000 that
you need to buy the home. Responsible investing takes time, like five or 10-plus years, and this money needs time to grow. The second you withdraw
any of your contributions, you are cutting down that tree before it even has a chance to grow fruit. Once you withdraw
contributions from the past, you cannot replace that
money in the future. I get that emergencies happen in life, so that's why you need
to have money set aside in an emergency fund to
pay for those things.

Do not, under 99.999% of circumstances, use your Roth IRA money for anything other than when you retire. One thing I see way too many people doing is investing in a
taxable brokerage account before they have their Roth
IRA maxed out for the year. This is a huge mistake from a tax savings
perspective for some of you because of how each account is taxed. With a Roth IRA, you invest with money
that's already been taxed, so the money can grow tax-free
and be withdrawn tax-free.

With a taxable brokerage
account, you are paying taxes for the ongoing dividend
distributions every single year. Then you have to pay capital gains tax when you go to withdraw the money. Since the money within
a Roth IRA will grow and can be withdrawn tax-free, realistically, you want
this account to get as large as possible, but not at the expense of
your personal risk tolerance. You should not take on
additional levels of risk by investing in more
risky, unprofitable stocks that random YouTubers have been pumping over the past few years or actively manage funds to
try to achieve higher returns.

99% of people, including
myself, cannot handle investing in something with a
high risk and potential, potential, high return. So don't even bother. The money in this account
is for retirement, so is it really worth it to risk that 60-year-old's financial wellbeing because you decided to gamble with their money right now? I doubt it. Some of you might be over
the income limit to be able to contribute to a Roth IRA, or some of you will be at
that point in the future as your income grows. You can still contribute to a Roth IRA to take advantage of the tax-free growth by doing a backdoor Roth.

To simply explain the process,
all you do is contribute to a traditional IRA. Do not invest the money yet. Then contact your brokerage
to have them convert the money to a Roth IRA. Now, I have done it with M1 Finance before and it was extremely easy. It only took I think two or three days for the money to get into my Roth IRA. Only do this if it makes sense based on your current tax rates
and future financial plans. There's two things that you can do. if you are someone who thinks that you might be over the income limit, but you are not going to 100%
know until the year is over. Number one, you can
either wait until January of the following year,
like we talked about in one of the previous mistakes that
I mentioned, or number two, you can just contribute the
money to a traditional IRA, then do a backdoor Roth within
the year to get the money into the account so it can be invested.

That way, if you are
over the income limit, you've already done the backdoor Roth. If you're under the income limit, no big deal 'cause you had to pay taxes on that money that was going
into the Roth IRA anyways. A question I get a lot is
whether or not you can contribute to a Roth IRA on different brokerages. The simple answer is yes. This is how it would play out. You can contribute up to the max for one year
on, say, M1 Finance. Then you can decide to contribute up to the max on fidelity the next year. Then you can contribute up to the max on Vanguard the following year. So by the end of that third year, you would have three different Roth IRAs with three different brokerages, and there is no problem with that.

You can take it one step further. If you decide, hey, out of these three, I actually like M1 finance
better than the other two, you can convert the
Roth IRAs with Fidelity and Vanguard into your
M1 Finance Roth IRA. You can also split up your contribution for the same year among
different brokerages. So if for this year you want
to say contribute $4,000 to an M1 Finance Roth IRA and the remaining $2,500
into a Fidelity Roth IRA, then you can do that without any problems.

The only thing you
cannot do is try to game the system by saying contributing $6500 into an M1 Finance Roth IRA and $6500 into a Roth IRA with another brokerage. You cannot exceed the maximum
amount allowed per year across all of your Roth IRAs on all of your brokerage accounts. Technically, you could do that since all of the brokerages aren't talking
to each other to keep track of what you are contributing, so you have to self-manage this.

I would highly, highly recommend making sure
that you do not do this, whether it's on purpose or on accident. I don't know what the penalty is for this, but all I know is that you do
not want to get caught trying to defraud the government
in any way, shape, or form. Long-term investing is the name
of the game with a Roth IRA. This money is for when
you are in retirement, so make sure to take that into account when investing this money. No gambling it on stocks
that random YouTubers are promoting. I think the two or three fund portfolio is perfect for your Roth IRA, which you can learn more about
in these videos to your left.

There's a bunch of free stocks and resources down in
the description below to help with all of your personal finance and investing needs. I'll see you in the next one, friends, go..

As found on YouTube

401K to Gold IRA Rollover

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