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Step 1 of Retirement Success Plan: Investment and Portfolio Analysis

I'm giving you a choice of two Investments investment a and investment B both of them return 10 over the previous year which one would you rather have been invested [Music] oftentimes when I ask this question to a prospective client I'll get the response Troy it doesn't matter they both return 10 Give Me A or B but when it comes to retirement planning and this is why step one of the rrsp is so important the allocation meeting it's not about the return necessarily it's about how much risk did we have to take to get that return investment A and B both had a 10 percent return but this is just one outcome in an infinite set of possible outcomes remember these are two distinct Investments with different characteristics possibly different purposes so even though they return the same the question is how much risk did we take to earn this return are we being compensated enough from a reward standpoint based on the risk that we're taking so with a high degree of statistical confidence we could analyze and say investment a had a likely downside scenario of somewhere between five to fifteen percent if a different set of outcomes or circumstances occurred that's the risk profile but invest B had a possible downside of negative 20 to negative 40 percent now with that new bit of information which investment would you choose investment a or investment B all individual Investments or combination of Investments could be plotted somewhere along this chart this is what we call the efficient Frontier over here we have the return the expected return and over here we have the risk that we're taking so ideally we have Investments that are more to the left which represents lower risk and higher up the y-axis which represents higher return so if you own five different stocks that portfolio in and of itself could be plotted somewhere on this graph if you have one security let's say you're fully invested in your company stock you could plot it right here on this graph now if you have 20 or 30 or 50 different mutual funds or ETFs or individual stocks once again that set of Investments can be plotted somewhere on this graph so when we plot investment a and investment B on the graph here we can clearly see that they have a similar return profile but investment a has less risk so this makes it easier to identify as an investment that we would rather place our dollars now down here I have investment C could be a portfolio of stocks this could be maybe if you have a lot of money invested in your company stock but we clearly see that we're taking more risk without being rewarded for that risk that we're taking another way to think about this is think of your skills and the capability that you have in your current job or in your former job if you're if you're retired would you take a salary that was much much lower than Market in order to do that same job with those same responsibilities no you probably would not I know you would not that's what we're doing here with investment C essentially we are taking risk or taking on responsibilities in that example while not being compensated for it okay so think of these letters investment a investment being investment C this was the one we wanted to be in this is the one that we took a little bit more risk for the same return and over here we just don't want to be in I want to liken this to GPA grade point average because we're all pretty familiar with that either you from your schooling experience you have kids or grandkids an a investment or set of Investments kind of I put a in air quotes here that's the GPA so what we want to do with your portfolio in retirement is increase its GPA we want to reduce risk and increase expected return now that you have a good understanding of risk and return and how every set of Investments can be placed somewhere on that graph it's now important to tie that into retirement planning so the allocation determines how much income you can take how much money will be left later in life it determines how much tax you'll pay in retirement it can also impact your health care strategy or long-term care strategy and it definitely impacts your overall estate plan so those are the five steps of the RSP and this is why the allocation is so critical it's step one because it impacts everything else when you reach out to us for the first time all we do on that first visit is get to understand who you are and what's important to you we're going to gather some of the objective data under of course understand what your vision is for retirement your goals but the objective data is the current portfolio the financial statements the tax information how much we want to spend in retirement in between that first and the second visit we're going to go through an analysis to see where your portfolio falls on that Spectrum in order to understand if there's congruence between your willingness to take risk for the expected return that your portfolio can provide and where you currently are we first have to identify what is that willingness that you have to take on risk so we have to first understand your willingness to take risk so this is a pretty simple questionnaire here simply saying over the next six months you're comfortable risking this in order to make this potential return now this is what we call a symmetrical risk return profile we're essentially risking one dollar to earn one dollar but really what we're trying to identify here is what is your comfort zone on the downside because what we're going to try to do is create a portfolio that has an asymmetrical risk return profile so less risk to achieve more potential return so are you comfortable losing seven percent over the next six months in a recession or are you fine to let it stay invested and you believe long-term capital markets are going to do just fine so you're more comfortable in the short term possibly a 13 loss there's no right or wrong answer here but everyone's personal willingness to take risk is different so we have to identify that because if you have a portfolio that has too much risk that is the one thing that will absolutely be certain to blow up a long-term retirement plan if the market goes down you call us up panicking and say Troy I need to get out of the market I can't take it anymore well you most likely won't be in there for the rebound and all the planning that we've done up to that point can be significantly impacted because we were expecting the risk profile based on the conversations that we had to be structured properly and if it's not and the markets go down then we get out well all of a sudden everything is completely messed up so this is why your risk willingness is such an important concept because if we're putting a plan together we need to know that you're going to stick with it because markets will go down one other thing to point out here I like to focus on the dollar amount because percentages can be deceiving I had a client a long time ago or a prospective client come in and say Troy I'm comfortable losing about 10 percent he had two million dollars so I said okay if the market goes down and you lose 200 000 you're okay with that he said no I fire you instantly so there was a disconnect between the 10 percent and the two hundred thousand dollars so I like to talk about risk in terms of dollars because percentages seem just they don't really drill down into our willingness to take risk whereas if we focus on the dollar amount that hits home okay so this would be coming back on a second visit and we're looking at your actual portfolio and this is very similar to what we see someone maybe told us that they're they're comfortable let's say with about 50 stock but when we do the analysis what we often find is that there's more risk inside the portfolio but on top of there being more risk oftentimes it's not the most efficiently structured so we see down here we actually have bringing the GPA back a 3.1 so this means that it's not the most efficient from a risk-adjusted return standpoint means we're we're not where we want to be on that graph an annual range 3.42 so for taking this much risk we don't want to be rewarded with an annual range midpoint here of only 3.42 percent over the next six months now we also see with the potential risk and reward over the next six months there's a 95 percent probability that this portfolio to the downside could lose 16 percent over a six-month period and the upside is plus 19 so these are very very wide guard rails okay if we extrapolate that out over the course of one year we have a negative 32 percent and a plus 38 so most of our clients aren't comfortable losing potentially 38 percent in a single year so for this level of risk based on the questionnaire that we asked earlier and they come in around a 50 risk score this is not only too much risk inside the portfolio but it's really poorly constructed from an analytical standpoint and the guardrails are far too wide we're not being compensated for the risk that we're taking and that's what this GPA right here is telling us that's the analysis that we go through between the first and the second visit and that's often what we see it's not efficiently structured the portfolio possibly too much risk and oftentimes that GPA is a lower number meaning we're not being compensated with enough expected return for the risk that we're taking so in between that first and the second visit that's what our team is doing looking at your particular situation now once you become a client and we go through that allocation visit this is step one of the RSP what we're trying to do is to create a proposed portfolio that brings first and foremost the risk number in line with that questionnaire that we asked you before we're also trying to create some asymmetry in regards to the risk that we're taking in the expected Return of the set of Investments that we've put together so now what we've done is we've lowered the overall risk score of the portfolio to be more in line with the questions that we were asking in regards to that that slider that we had on the screen if you're not comfortable with potentially losing 19 percent in a six-month period we need to bring the risk score down in the portfolio so that's the first thing that we're trying to do the second thing is we're trying to create asymmetry here so you see this we're risking nine for the potential of 15.

This is over a six month period so we extrapolate that out over 12 months it's minus 18 for plus 30. that's asymmetry when it comes to the risk return profile additionally we've increased the GPA of the portfolio so the maximum according to the software is a 4.3 so this means we're being properly compensated for the risk that we're taking the expected return is the proper compensation for that risk now anything can happen Marcus can go up or down but what we've done is we've created an efficient portfolio that when markets are up or when markets are down our potential returns are in line with our willingness to take risks but also when we've tied this into your income plan tax plan and the rest of the RSP it's all creating a much more congruent financial planning experience also the expense ratio over here I don't know if you noticed before but we had an expense ratio in the mutual funds and that current portfolio in the proposed portfolio we've eliminated those fees so in summary here during the first visit we get to know where your willingness to take risk is in between the first and the second visit we're going through and doing an analysis of your current portfolio identifying the risk score see if there's any disconnect between your willingness to take risk in the actual risk inside your portfolio but then also looking at the potential return what is the GPA what is the expected return what is the Symmetry between these two once you become a client and we go through the allocation meeting here's where we look at the proposed portfolio where we get the risk number of the portfolio in a line with an alignment with your willingness to take risks try to increase the asymmetry between the risk and the potential return increase the GPA of the portfolio and increase the expected return now all of this is a shortened version of what the actual allocation visit looks like but it hopefully conveys how important this step is because it not only determines the amount of risk or the potential downside you could see to your values in retirement it also of course contributes to the potential return which then dominoes into your income for retirement the taxes the health care plan and also the estate strategy so step one allocation extremely critical when it comes to the retirement success plan this is why we do it first [Music] thank you

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Step 1 of Retirement Success Plan: Investment and Portfolio Analysis

I'm giving you a choice of two Investments investment a and investment B both of them return 10 over the previous year which one would you rather have been invested [Music] oftentimes when I ask this question to a prospective client I'll get the response Troy it doesn't matter they both return 10 Give Me A or B but when it comes to retirement planning and this is why step one of the rrsp is so important the allocation meeting it's not about the return necessarily it's about how much risk did we have to take to get that return investment A and B both had a 10 percent return but this is just one outcome in an infinite set of possible outcomes remember these are two distinct Investments with different characteristics possibly different purposes so even though they return the same the question is how much risk did we take to earn this return are we being compensated enough from a reward standpoint based on the risk that we're taking so with a high degree of statistical confidence we could analyze and say investment a had a likely downside scenario of somewhere between five to fifteen percent if a different set of outcomes or circumstances occurred that's the risk profile but invest B had a possible downside of negative 20 to negative 40 percent now with that new bit of information which investment would you choose investment a or investment B all individual Investments or combination of Investments could be plotted somewhere along this chart this is what we call the efficient Frontier over here we have the return the expected return and over here we have the risk that we're taking so ideally we have Investments that are more to the left which represents lower risk and higher up the y-axis which represents higher return so if you own five different stocks that portfolio in and of itself could be plotted somewhere on this graph if you have one security let's say you're fully invested in your company stock you could plot it right here on this graph now if you have 20 or 30 or 50 different mutual funds or ETFs or individual stocks once again that set of Investments can be plotted somewhere on this graph so when we plot investment a and investment B on the graph here we can clearly see that they have a similar return profile but investment a has less risk so this makes it easier to identify as an investment that we would rather place our dollars now down here I have investment C could be a portfolio of stocks this could be maybe if you have a lot of money invested in your company stock but we clearly see that we're taking more risk without being rewarded for that risk that we're taking another way to think about this is think of your skills and the capability that you have in your current job or in your former job if you're if you're retired would you take a salary that was much much lower than Market in order to do that same job with those same responsibilities no you probably would not I know you would not that's what we're doing here with investment C essentially we are taking risk or taking on responsibilities in that example while not being compensated for it okay so think of these letters investment a investment being investment C this was the one we wanted to be in this is the one that we took a little bit more risk for the same return and over here we just don't want to be in I want to liken this to GPA grade point average because we're all pretty familiar with that either you from your schooling experience you have kids or grandkids an a investment or set of Investments kind of I put a in air quotes here that's the GPA so what we want to do with your portfolio in retirement is increase its GPA we want to reduce risk and increase expected return now that you have a good understanding of risk and return and how every set of Investments can be placed somewhere on that graph it's now important to tie that into retirement planning so the allocation determines how much income you can take how much money will be left later in life it determines how much tax you'll pay in retirement it can also impact your health care strategy or long-term care strategy and it definitely impacts your overall estate plan so those are the five steps of the RSP and this is why the allocation is so critical it's step one because it impacts everything else when you reach out to us for the first time all we do on that first visit is get to understand who you are and what's important to you we're going to gather some of the objective data under of course understand what your vision is for retirement your goals but the objective data is the current portfolio the financial statements the tax information how much we want to spend in retirement in between that first and the second visit we're going to go through an analysis to see where your portfolio falls on that Spectrum in order to understand if there's congruence between your willingness to take risk for the expected return that your portfolio can provide and where you currently are we first have to identify what is that willingness that you have to take on risk so we have to first understand your willingness to take risk so this is a pretty simple questionnaire here simply saying over the next six months you're comfortable risking this in order to make this potential return now this is what we call a symmetrical risk return profile we're essentially risking one dollar to earn one dollar but really what we're trying to identify here is what is your comfort zone on the downside because what we're going to try to do is create a portfolio that has an asymmetrical risk return profile so less risk to achieve more potential return so are you comfortable losing seven percent over the next six months in a recession or are you fine to let it stay invested and you believe long-term capital markets are going to do just fine so you're more comfortable in the short term possibly a 13 loss there's no right or wrong answer here but everyone's personal willingness to take risk is different so we have to identify that because if you have a portfolio that has too much risk that is the one thing that will absolutely be certain to blow up a long-term retirement plan if the market goes down you call us up panicking and say Troy I need to get out of the market I can't take it anymore well you most likely won't be in there for the rebound and all the planning that we've done up to that point can be significantly impacted because we were expecting the risk profile based on the conversations that we had to be structured properly and if it's not and the markets go down then we get out well all of a sudden everything is completely messed up so this is why your risk willingness is such an important concept because if we're putting a plan together we need to know that you're going to stick with it because markets will go down one other thing to point out here I like to focus on the dollar amount because percentages can be deceiving I had a client a long time ago or a prospective client come in and say Troy I'm comfortable losing about 10 percent he had two million dollars so I said okay if the market goes down and you lose 200 000 you're okay with that he said no I fire you instantly so there was a disconnect between the 10 percent and the two hundred thousand dollars so I like to talk about risk in terms of dollars because percentages seem just they don't really drill down into our willingness to take risk whereas if we focus on the dollar amount that hits home okay so this would be coming back on a second visit and we're looking at your actual portfolio and this is very similar to what we see someone maybe told us that they're they're comfortable let's say with about 50 stock but when we do the analysis what we often find is that there's more risk inside the portfolio but on top of there being more risk oftentimes it's not the most efficiently structured so we see down here we actually have bringing the GPA back a 3.1 so this means that it's not the most efficient from a risk-adjusted return standpoint means we're we're not where we want to be on that graph an annual range 3.42 so for taking this much risk we don't want to be rewarded with an annual range midpoint here of only 3.42 percent over the next six months now we also see with the potential risk and reward over the next six months there's a 95 percent probability that this portfolio to the downside could lose 16 percent over a six-month period and the upside is plus 19 so these are very very wide guard rails okay if we extrapolate that out over the course of one year we have a negative 32 percent and a plus 38 so most of our clients aren't comfortable losing potentially 38 percent in a single year so for this level of risk based on the questionnaire that we asked earlier and they come in around a 50 risk score this is not only too much risk inside the portfolio but it's really poorly constructed from an analytical standpoint and the guardrails are far too wide we're not being compensated for the risk that we're taking and that's what this GPA right here is telling us that's the analysis that we go through between the first and the second visit and that's often what we see it's not efficiently structured the portfolio possibly too much risk and oftentimes that GPA is a lower number meaning we're not being compensated with enough expected return for the risk that we're taking so in between that first and the second visit that's what our team is doing looking at your particular situation now once you become a client and we go through that allocation visit this is step one of the RSP what we're trying to do is to create a proposed portfolio that brings first and foremost the risk number in line with that questionnaire that we asked you before we're also trying to create some asymmetry in regards to the risk that we're taking in the expected Return of the set of Investments that we've put together so now what we've done is we've lowered the overall risk score of the portfolio to be more in line with the questions that we were asking in regards to that that slider that we had on the screen if you're not comfortable with potentially losing 19 percent in a six-month period we need to bring the risk score down in the portfolio so that's the first thing that we're trying to do the second thing is we're trying to create asymmetry here so you see this we're risking nine for the potential of 15.

This is over a six month period so we extrapolate that out over 12 months it's minus 18 for plus 30. that's asymmetry when it comes to the risk return profile additionally we've increased the GPA of the portfolio so the maximum according to the software is a 4.3 so this means we're being properly compensated for the risk that we're taking the expected return is the proper compensation for that risk now anything can happen Marcus can go up or down but what we've done is we've created an efficient portfolio that when markets are up or when markets are down our potential returns are in line with our willingness to take risks but also when we've tied this into your income plan tax plan and the rest of the RSP it's all creating a much more congruent financial planning experience also the expense ratio over here I don't know if you noticed before but we had an expense ratio in the mutual funds and that current portfolio in the proposed portfolio we've eliminated those fees so in summary here during the first visit we get to know where your willingness to take risk is in between the first and the second visit we're going through and doing an analysis of your current portfolio identifying the risk score see if there's any disconnect between your willingness to take risk in the actual risk inside your portfolio but then also looking at the potential return what is the GPA what is the expected return what is the Symmetry between these two once you become a client and we go through the allocation meeting here's where we look at the proposed portfolio where we get the risk number of the portfolio in a line with an alignment with your willingness to take risks try to increase the asymmetry between the risk and the potential return increase the GPA of the portfolio and increase the expected return now all of this is a shortened version of what the actual allocation visit looks like but it hopefully conveys how important this step is because it not only determines the amount of risk or the potential downside you could see to your values in retirement it also of course contributes to the potential return which then dominoes into your income for retirement the taxes the health care plan and also the estate strategy so step one allocation extremely critical when it comes to the retirement success plan this is why we do it first [Music] thank you

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2 Retirement Tax Planning Strategies To Save THOUSANDS In Your Retirement Portfolio!

how would you like to save hundreds of thousands of dollars potentially in taxes in retirement well these two strategies I'm going to go through today when combined together have the potential to do just that now if you don't qualify for net unrealized appreciation because you don't have company stock inside your 401k you can still qualify for zero percent taxes on your long-term capital gains and dividends so when we combine these strategies together it creates a very powerful tax and income planning tool that you can use for your retirement [Music] foreign as you can tell I'm pretty excited about this video because we're going to discuss two tax planning strategies the net unrealized appreciation which I've not yet done a video on the YouTube channel about and also the zero percent taxation for long-term capital gains and dividends and you're going to want to stick around until the end of the video where I incorporate these two strategies into a real life financial planning case now unless you've searched net unrealized appreciation to find this video there's a pretty good chance you've never heard of net unrealized appreciation so in its most basic form it's when you have company stock that's been issued inside your 401k you have the option of rolling that money outside of your 401k not into an IRA but rolling it out only paying income tax on the basis that's been distributed and potentially pay long-term capital gains tax on the appreciation so that appreciation from where it was issued to where it is whenever you roll it out and retire or sever from service or become 59 and a half that's what's called your net unrealized appreciation we're here in Houston Texas where we have a lot of client clients that worked at Exxon Mobil or Chevron or some of the other big oil and gas companies we also have clients from all over the country that work for other companies that can take advantage of this net unrealized depreciation strategy so I'm going to use Exxon because we come across this plan a lot we're very familiar with the Exxon retirement plan and I want to illustrate how this concept works and there's some nuances here and there's also some financial planning considerations and of course tax ramifications that we're going to go through but if I worked at Exxon let's say from 1995 to 2020 and as part of my compensation I receive shares of stock each year over the course of my employment so these numbers are not historically accurate but I want to convey the the principle here so in the beginning years if Exxon was trading at twenty dollars and I received a hundred shares and then next year maybe I received them at 22 dollars per share and twenty five dollars per share and over time as I've received more shares as part of my compensation package the value has typically increases the price at which you were issued those shares in the year you received them is what's called your cost basis so if we do this Nua rollout that's the amount that you'll have to pay income taxes on but it's a really cool opportunity here because over time most stocks appreciate in value Exxon today is at a hundred and sixteen dollars per share so the concept of Nua is if I was issued stock at twenty dollars a share and I keep it in the IRA and now it's at 116 dollars a share that's a massive amount of capital appreciation and if I roll it to an IRA and distribute it at that point or at some point in the future I'm going to income taxes and that can can lead to a pretty big tax liability now we're down the road when I need income but if stocks appreciate it over time we typically have a mixed cost basis when it comes to the amount of shares that we've received from the company so first thing to know here and first thing to ask your company is do you guys provide a breakdown of the cost basis on an annual reporting period or do you take the average cost basis so we come across some companies here that they will provide you the information of the exact cost basis and the amount of shares that you've received in each year in that case we can really cherry pick which shares we want to roll out and really take advantage of this strategy because typically we're going to take the lower cost basis ones some companies don't allow you to cherry pick based on the lower basis shares that were issued they calculate an average cost basis for all the shares issued so this is not nearly as advantageous as being able to cherry pick sometimes it can still make sense especially if it's an older 401k or if it's a stock that has really really appreciated since those shares were issued in the average cost basis is down so this video my primary purpose is to help educate you around the financial planning considerations of the Nua rollout so I'm not going to cover all the rules and reg surrounding it I'll do that in a later video though but a couple things you should know this becomes an opportunity whenever you sever from service or typically when you're entering retirement there are some other qualifications but we'll cover those later now if you sever from service prior to age 55 you will be subject to a 10 penalty on the amount you distribute so just be aware that if you're under the age of 55 you've severed from service you have company stock inside your 401k that that 10 penalty for early distribution still applies we have Exxon this 401K here so the total value is about 1.5 million in this hypothetical example the shares the tote in totality the shares have been issued over the course of the working career equals about a six hundred thousand dollar cost basis so I'm going to use the example here where we can cherry pick the individual shares so the next question becomes which shares should I consider doing the Nua rollout because I don't have to roll all six hundred thousand basis out in the real world typically this 1.5 million of fair market value may also be comprised of mutual funds such as growth funds income Etc within the 401K for the purpose of this example Exxon stock is valued at 1.5 million dollars the cost basis of those Exxon shares within the 401K is 600 000.

Just want to point out in the real world typically everyone does not have all their money invested in their company stock but I've I've absolutely seen that over the years so the question becomes which shares do we want to take advantage of the annual rollout with the general rule of thumb is the lower cost basis Shares are more attractive and that's determined by the the value of the stock today anything above 50 percent cost basis to fair market value typically we don't want to consider for Nua now there are some extenuating circumstances sometimes with financial planning considerations that it may make sense but when we do the math and we extrapolate out looking at the value that you would have in the ira versus paying taxes on the basis now annual taxation for growth dividends Etc the Breakeven point isn't that attractive when we look at these shares that are above 50 percent cost basis to fair market value I personally like to see them around 20 or 30 percent really tops so whenever you have shares that are 10 15 20 25 cost basis to fair market value those are typically very attractive opportunities and in some situations Thirty thirty five forty percent could possibly make sense it just depends on the overall financial plan that you're putting together in other circumstances so this is a tax analysis so you may want to reach out to your CPA for help or assistance in doing this or your financial advisor if they're qualified and skilled enough to help you make these determinations I want to run through some numbers now so let's assume for whatever reason this person decides to do the whole Nua rollout so just so we understand the how this functionally works the 600 000 rolls out of the 401K into a non-ira account income tax is due on that six hundred thousand dollars you're probably looking at about a 27 28 maybe 30 percent effective tax rate we'll go with 30.

So 100 eighty thousand dollars of income taxes would be due on the basis being rolled out but in this scenario you're not just rolling out 600 000 That's the basis you're actually rolling 1.5 million dollars out of the 401K and only paying income tax on the basis now if you sell it immediately the net unrealized appreciation is the difference between the basis and the fair market value so you have nine hundred thousand dollars of gain there so if you sell that nine hundred thousand you're looking at the more preferential long-term capital gains tax that would be a pretty big tax still so the question becomes the are what planning considerations should we hold on to this stock do we feel comfortable having this much in one company what is our other wealth what if we break it out over a few years so this is what we're really going to dive into now I just want you to understand how this actually works in regards to the functionality okay let's cover how this actually works so we take the Exxon stock the basis is 600 000 but the full value is 1.5 million so if in this example we decide we want to do it all we would roll the full 1.5 million out of the 401K it will go into a non-ira account but you only owe income taxes on the basis the 600 000.

If you sell the stock immediately you will owe long-term capital gains tax which is a more preferential rate than income taxes at this level of income on the difference between the basis and the fair market value or nine hundred thousand there but you don't have to sell it right away if you don't sell it right away and then you sell it six months later you'll be subject to short-term capital gains tax because you're holding period rules take take into a place or taken to effect if you don't sell it immediately but if you wait 12 months after the distribution date 12 months in one day then you qualify for long-term capital gains tax treatment so some of the financial planning considerations are now what are the income taxes due what is my income and tax plan year one year two year three of retirement how does this fit into that overall tax and income plan and how do we optimize how do we reduce the total taxes we pay while maximizing the value that we retain if we have to pay income taxes on six hundred thousand dollars you're looking at an effective tax rate there of about 27 28 maybe 30 percent so 30 on 600 is a hundred and eighty Grand so you'd write that check to Uncle Sam and you would have 1.5 million outside of the 401K in the more preferential tax environment of long-term capital gains and dividends now you would have annual taxation on these dividends so that's something else we need to consider and we also need to consider future tax rates and make assumptions with what do we think income tax rates are going to be in the future long-term capital gains and dividend rates all of these things go into the analysis but for now this is the logistics of how it works we roll it all out pay income taxes on the basis we can either sell it immediately and pay long-term capital gains on the differential or we can hold it and if we hold it past the distribution date sell it within 12 months short-term capital gains sell it post 12 months long-term capital gains okay so I want to dive deeper into the two options we have just high level so option A is We Roll everything to the IRA we do not take advantage of the Nua rollout eligibility things that we have to consider here is future tax rates rmds other income sources and the secure act now this is not an exhaustive list this is just some of the big ones we have to take and consider future tax rates because when everything is inside that tax infested Ira when you distribute it in the future you have to pay income taxes you've given up the ability to take advantage of long-term capital gains and dividend taxes which are typically a preferential rate rmds Force distributions from your retirement account and when added with other income we oftentimes see people who did not plan for this have 150 200 250 even more of income because of required minimum distributions and their other income so when doing this analysis we have to extrapolate out and look at these factors to help make the decision today secure act I threw this in here because it forces distribution of your retirement accounts if they go to a non-spouse beneficiary that's more than 10 years younger than you full distribution of the retirement account within 10 years so if you have kids and it's important to leave this money to your children if they have income and they're working and now your retirement account has to be fully distributed within 10 years that could be a massive amount of income going on top of their income which now 30 40 50 60 potentially of your retirement account has gone to Uncle Sam if you live in a state with income taxes that could be an issue as well inheritance taxes so a lot of issues here rolling everything into the IRA you can be hit with um pretty big income taxes down the road option b is we do take advantage of the Nua rollout either wholly or in a partial Nua rollout how that works is we would take the shares that we do decide to take advantage of this strategy and we roll them into the non-ira account some things to consider there is that what are long-term capital gain rates now what are they possibly going to be in the future but also we have annual taxation of the dividends and if we're buying and selling inside that account whatever we do not roll into the non-ira account with the strategy the rest of the funds from your 401k go into the IRA and then of course whatever's left here we have the same considerations that I went through over here so now there are financial planning considerations here let's say I was at 35 cost basis to fair market value so I'm kind of right there where mathematically it may not make sense but how much non-qualified money do I have how much essentially I'm saying how much do you have outside of your retirement accounts because if you're entering retirement and all that money is inside that tax infested 401K then you don't have any ability to manipulate what goes on your 1040 your tax return by manipulate I mean we determine which accounts were withdrawing income from to manage our taxable income that we report to the IRS if we pull from our non-qualified accounts think your bank account well you don't have to report that so if you need a hundred thousand a year we pull 50 from your bank and 50 from your IRA you get your 100 000 but only fifty thousand goes on the tax return that's how we can manipulate that so how much non-qualified money do you have if you don't have much we may want to consider doing a little bit higher Nua rollout because even mathematically it may not make sense when we just compare that decision in isolation to do or not to do the Nua rollout but when we now look at the other benefits that we're receiving such as the ability to do Roth conversions the ability to manipulate what goes on our 1040 the ability to possibly qualify for a health care subsidy if you retire before the age of 65 by managing the reportable or taxable income that's reportable we can qualify for a subsidy so this is why we're so big on financial planning because as you can see it's not just about Investment Management in retirement that's important absolutely but when we tie in financial planning with Investment Management we can create some really optimal scenarios where we're creating a ton of value and helping you have more income pay less tax and ultimately have more value throughout the course of your retirement okay this is the part that I mentioned in the beginning of the video where we're going to tie into kind of a real world plan planning case so we laid the groundwork for what Nua is and some of the considerations that you have to make in order to determine if it makes sense for you to do the Nua rollout so what I want to point out here is the tax and income plan for retirement years one two and three for someone who takes advantage of the Nua rollout because the question becomes when do we sell that stock if we have 30 40 50 percent of our entire net worth in our company stock it's pretty risky to hold on to that position just so we don't pay more in taxes so here's where we're going to tie the financial planning considerations of the real world application and decisions we have to make on the Nua rollout with years one two and three of someone just entering retirement one of the big risks is if we roll it out the company's stock and we decide not to sell it because we don't want to pay the long-term capital gains immediately if we hold on to that that concentrated Equity position we have increased our risk now there are investment strategies that can be used such as buying a put option or what we call an Equity caller but I want to just talk about the tax and income plan here so in this scenario client rolls out the annual way so they have a large concentrated Equity position and they've paid income tax on the basis but do not want to sell the company stock yet so as part of the tax and income plan what I want to show you is we could break this up so year two year three and even year four possibly depending on the size of the concentrated Equity position Company stock where zero percent taxes essentially so we have total income here of a hundred and twenty thousand so what this is the tax and income strategy where we're generating income year two of retirement not year one because in year one you've done the the Nua rollout you have a big tax liability from paying income taxes on the cost basis of that company stock so here's your two so year two the the tax and income strategy is don't take anything out of the 401K no Roth conversions we're going to sell the company stock that we previously rolled out take advantage of Nua and we can have a hundred and twenty thousand dollars of income here as long as it's all capital gains and dividends your total tax liability 458 dollars now what I've done here is assumed twenty thousand dollars of dividends because if you have company stock and you roll it out it probably paid some dividends so 20K there and a hundred thousand of long-term capital gains we're realizing we're recognizing so this is darn near zero percent on a hundred and twenty thousand dollars of retirement income and we're divesting from that company stock now again some risk management strategies we could have an equity caller or put option helping to support downside volatility of that concentrated position but just taxing in complaining wise I want to show you how how this can work out so here now I've added 125 000 of long-term capital gains with twenty thousand dollars of dividends total AGI 145 000 the total tax 4208 on 145k of income 2.9 percent so again we've divested so maybe this is year two of retirement or year three we've divested from the company stock we've reduced our risk we've provided the income that we needed for retirement and we've done so in a way that's tax advantaged same thing goes on now I wanted to point this one out because I've here I've thrown in the same 20 000 of dividends 125 000 of long-term capital gains so we're selling the stock again but now we also take advantage of a twenty thousand dollar Ira distribution so this is which accounts do we pull income from in retirement how do we generate income what's the tax plan total AGI comes up to 165 the total tax is 7208 but here's the cool part the IRS ordering rules for how you pay tax on income based on where that income is generated the distribution from the IRA is actually tax-free but what happens is when you take money out of the IRA it brings some of those long-term capital gains into taxation so I did a video not too long ago where we talked about adjustments and Social Security and IRA distributions and wealth conversion taxes the tax code is filled with these where if we we take one more dollar of income it brings one other item into now a taxable State such as Social Security or long-term capital gains or dividends so just just be aware of that I guess 165 000 of income seven thousand two hundred and eight dollars in income taxes representing a four point four percent tax rate so now one two three four years into retirement we've divested the uh concentrated stock risk we provided income and a very tax advantaged manner we still have that Ira with a lot of money in it to deal with but once this is done we would probably at that point start down the Roth conversion path now every situation is different but hopefully these topics and ideas and and considerations when it comes to risk management income planning tax planning and retirement will help you have a better retirement if you want to learn in more detail how to potentially pay zero percent in long-term capital gains and on your dividends click this video right here I did a couple years ago where we do a deeper dive into the special tax advantage [Music] thank you

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Retirement Planning From a CFP® Professional: 6 Keys to a Happy and Successful Retirement

sometimes I feel like I've lived through my 60s and 70s thousands of times sitting with people in retirement or those that are entering retirement we come across a lot of the same fears negative thoughts and feelings that really hold people back from having a happier retirement now we try to address those through retirement strategy and implementing plans but in today's video instead of talking about strategy I want to talk to you about how we look at retirement so you can hopefully look at retirement through a different lens and I believe this will help you have a happier retirement foreign [Music] Happy Gilmore recently and there's this place that he goes to and he calls it his happy place and if you remember the movie the lead actress she's sitting there by like a fountain of beer with pictures and Happy's grandmothers there and it's just his happy place and this helps Happy Gilmore putt a little bit better to find your happy place in retirement I want you to shift your focus away from simply trying to maximize return in retirement it's not about growing Your Nest Egg anymore what we want to do is have an acceptable level of risk something that when the market goes down we can still stay invested we can stay committed to that plan but at the same time for that level of risk we have an expected return that can help make sure that you don't run out of money and generate enough growth to provide the income that you need to maintain your standard of living so here is one of the tools that we use to help understand your willingness to take risk so risk tolerance really has two components it has a capacity component meaning given a certain level of income that you desire from your portfolio can your portfolio withstand a certain level of risk and still provide that income so that's what we call risk capacity but then you have your willingness to stay invested in a down market so when we look here this is a standard 60 40 portfolio 600 000 stocks 400 000 in bonds has a risk number on a scale of 1 to 99 of 54.

now in isolation that means absolutely nothing to you but when we start to break it down into percentages and also or I should say more importantly dollars over a six month period your standard 60 40 portfolio has the potential to lose a hundred thousand dollars with a million invested this is a statistical quantitative analysis of volatility of this portfolio going back many years now over a 12-month period that means you could lose two hundred and twelve thousand dollars mathematically speaking is that a comfortable level of risk for you if you have a million dollars it's not for me to answer that's for you to answer that's your willingness to take risk so over a 12-month period mathematically you should expect to lose at some point in time up to twenty percent you could lose more of course this is a 95 probability or what we call two standard deviations but we have what we want to achieve here is a more optimal level of risk for an expected return so we have asymmetry here where the possible upside mathematically speaking is 15.92 percent over a six month period so we do have some asymmetry here but when we look a little bit deeper the annual range midpoint is 5.27 so this would be the expected return kind of moving forward with a two percent dividend this GPA this is a pretty cool feature of this software it's designed to help you understand what we call risk adjusted returns and this is this concept is kind of what I'm talking about here they've developed this GPA and a 4.3 would be most Optimum now not every portfolio that fits your particular needs is going to be a 4.3 we're not necessarily trying to achieve that but the higher we can get to that it means we have more expected return for the For Less risk so the question really becomes are you comfortable with this range of expected outcome if not this is too aggressive of a portfolio for you but instead of just focusing on like most people do the upside we need to focus more on this downside in having a plan that is optimized or having an investment strategy that's optimized for your happy place number two I want you to start to look at all of your investment choices in retirement for what they actually are now this is much different than in the accumulation phase in the retirement phase your financial investments all the various choices out there they're really nothing more than tools tools that are used to accomplish a certain objective similar to ingredients in a recipe if you have too much sugar or too much salt or not enough herbs or spices is it may not come out the way you want it to taste we want to use the appropriate tools to accomplish the objectives that you have in retirement stocks for example they aren't used to accumulate anymore stocks are designed to help keep you ahead of inflation so you can generate income that lasts as long as you do now in the accumulation phase that's exactly what stocks are designed to do they're designed to give you the best opportunity historically speaking to accumulate a larger and larger Nest Egg of course that assumes that you save enough money but in retirement you are no longer accumulating you are Distributing so stocks are used to help keep you ahead of inflation now the downside to stocks you could lose a lot of money especially if you get too aggressive or if you invest in things that don't perform well now does that make stocks bad because you could lose a whole bunch of money no they're just a tool and once you understand how to use that tool in conjunction with other tools now you can actually construct whatever project that you're building or have a retirement plan that provides you the income you need to maintain your standard of living the number three key for a happier retirement I want you to accept that you're in the distribution phase don't expect your accounts to continue to grow each and every single year this may seem like common sense but in reality and in practice it's much harder for many people to do now you've seen your accounts hopefully grow grow grow you've been putting money in the market has performed well over most years in the past even when the market performed poorly you are still putting money into your 401k getting that match hopefully saving money elsewhere now that you're in the retirement phase you're putting a lot of stress on your portfolio through distributions now I'm not saying your accounts can't still continue to accumulate especially if we have consecutive years in the market that that does really really well but what I'm saying is don't expect it you are in the distribution phase that means you're probably taking three percent four percent five percent out when we have years where the market is also down your portfolio is down you're digging a bigger hole than you were in the accumulation phase that means that hole is harder and harder to climb out of this is why the allocation of your Investments is so important and not taking too much risk you don't want to dig such a big hole that you can never get out but at the same time you need a certain level of risk to achieve a return that can give you a Secure Retirement so mentally let's not look at our accounts every single year and say oh man they're not going up they're not increasing in value I'm going to run out I need to stop spending my money now actually if you look at it appropriately you should not expect your accounts to continue to appreciate every single year in retirement that very May well happen but if it doesn't if you're just staying level or even going down a little bit it's okay you just need to have a plan monitor your progress with respect to your goals and stay on top of it number four I want you to understand the value of secure income in retirement the more secure income you have the less you have to withdraw from your portfolio and the less emotionally you're impacted by the stock market ups and downs by political goings on by economic slow Downs if you don't have to withdraw large percentages from your Investments because you're living on passive income from Real Estate from Social Security from annuities from a pension but the point is the more income you have coming in from multiple different places that is independent of the stock market going up typically the happier you'll be in retirement also I don't want you to underestimate the power of Social Security as part of your overall retirement income plan now I hear a lot of people making comments on some of the Social Security videos that we do and also just day to day having conversations with clients that Social Security seems to be an extremely underestimated part of retirement many people want to take it early and that may be the case maybe it makes sense for you to take it early but if a husband and wife have combined Social Security of 60 000 a year and you live let's say 25 years that's 600 000 1.2 1.5 million dollars of retirement income and for many of you watch watching this your Social Security is going to be a lot more than sixty thousand dollars per year so we're talking anywhere from one million to possibly over three million dollars of retirement income for a married couple for someone who's single Social Security you can just basically cut that in half so it's a significant part don't underestimate the power of secure sources of income in retirement and also don't underestimate how valuable deferring Social Security could potentially be if you're going to live past age 80 81 or so number five I would like you to stop looking at short-term outcomes whether your portfolio is up or down whether you pull too much out whether you had an unforeseen expense and you had to spend x amount of dollars I'd like you to start looking at these short-term outcomes of things that happen to you or decisions that you've made as nothing more than bumps in the road don't get too high don't get too low retirement is a very long and windy and arduous Journey this is why it's so important to have a plan and stay connected to that because when you have visibility into the future and you're looking at things not in the short term lens but over a 20 25 30 year time frame you can see a lot of times how actually unimportant these short-term events are so don't get too high don't get too low understand that these are bumps in the road in the short term but if you have a plan these bumps in the road have been accounted for next time the Market's down and your portfolio is down 10 or 12 or 15 or more say you know what I have a plan I expected this to happen this is not a surprise and retirement is a very long journey this is nothing more than a bump in the road the number six key to a happier retirement and I know this is going to be virtually impossible for many of you watching but the number six key probably the number one is to not look at your accounts more than once a month I would prefer it once a quarter so I know some of you right now are saying Troy that's impossible I look at it every single day I need to know what my stocks are doing what my accounts are doing how am I ever going to know if I'm going to be okay well there are numerous studies on this I encourage you to look some of them up the more frequently you look at your accounts typically the worst performance you'll have over long periods of time but the person who looks at it every single day over a long period of time I think it's 25 or 30 years averages somewhere around two to three percent per year the person who looks at it once a month averages somewhere around four to five the person who looks at it once a year averages somewhere around six to seven and the person who never looks at it has averaged around 10 or 11 percent and it makes sense because we are emotional beings when we see that something isn't going right we want to Tinker we want to make adjustments this typically leads to holding on to bad Investments maybe a little bit too long or getting rid of good Investments that just haven't really had the Catalyst that maybe you were expecting and selling them too soon or we're selling our winners and cutting our losers without giving them a chance to really perform well whatever the situation may be Studies have proven this over and over again the more frequently you look at your portfolio the worse you should expect to do so instead of discussing strategy and execution in today's video hopefully today's content helps shift your perspective just a little bit with the goal of helping you to have a happier retirement [Music] foreign [Music]

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Retirement: I’m 60 Years Old with $900K in Savings. Can I Retire Now? What is My Risk Capacity?

so you're 60 years old with nine hundred thousand dollars saved and the question is can you retire in today's video we're going to look at a few different decisions that could be made the impact those decisions have on the plan with the overall goal of not running out of money hi I'm Troy sharp CEO of Oak Harvest Financial Group a certified financial planner professional host of the retirement income show and a certified tax specialist in today's case study we're going to look at a situation that's not too dissimilar from what we normally encounter in our day-to-day operations here at Oak Harvest Financial Group so we have James who's 60 years old he comes in and he says Troy I want to spend about seventy thousand dollars and I'm just tired of working I want to to this year to be my last year so I want to spend seventy thousand dollars I think I'm going to live to about 90 years old pretty good health and I want this fifty thousand dollars to increase with inflation over the course of my retirement but for the first 10 years and what I hear you talk about in this go go spending phase I want to spend an additional 20 000 per year bringing that first 10 years of spending up to 70 000 per year then that go go spending goes away and then we have the inflation adjusted 50 000 to plan for from age 70 to age 90.

Hey just a brief Interruption here to ask you to subscribe to the channel now what that does for you is that puts us Oak Harvest Financial Group and all the content we produce in your little TV Guide so you have a much easier way to come back and find it later share this video with a friend or family member and also comment down below I love to respond to the comments now if you have any questions about your particular situation or you'd like to consider becoming a client of Oak Harvest feel free to reach out to us there's a link in the description below but you can always reach out to us and give us a call and have a conversation to see if we might be a good fit for each other James tells us that since he wants to retire as soon as possible he he thinks it makes sense to take Social Security the first time available so claiming at 62 a little more than two thousand dollars a month at twenty five thousand dollars per year he also has that nine hundred thousand dollars broken out to four 401K money of 700 Grand then 200 000 in a taxable account or what we call non-qualified outside of the retirement account very important to point out here that the tax characteristic of these two accounts and the Investments inside them and the interest and dividends and the withdrawals from them are taxed differently so that's part of an overall tax plan now James also has a home that's completely paid for and worth six hundred thousand dollars but he's told me that I don't want to use this to fund any of my retirement goals I've lived in this home for a long time I want to stay in the home but we know from a planning perspective that we do have that in our back pocket if it's needed down the road so James's total net worth here is about 1.5 million looking at the paid off home of six hundred thousand the 700 Grand inside the 401K and the 200 000 of non-qualified or taxable account assets now as part of the process to understand where someone is and where they're trying to get to we have to understand how is the portfolio currently allocated so James tells us that Troy I know I've wanted to retire so I've been investing aggressively and trying to get ahead of the game but here we are in 2022 and the markets have pulled back some so that double-edged sword is starting to kind of rear its rear its head but we see James's 93 stock so one of the questions that we have from an internal planning perspective is if we keep this same level of risk while we retire and start taking income out of the portfolio what does that do for what we call the risk capacity or the portfolio's ability to take on risk while Distributing income in the retirement phase so we have to look at the guard rails and guard rails are essentially a statistical calculation of probabilities of the portfolio returning this much on the high side and a good year and this much on the downside in a bad year if these guard rails are too far apart and we're taking in income out if we run into a bad couple of years that bump up against that bottom guardrail but we significantly increase the risk of running out of money so part of the analysis of the planning is is this an appropriate guard rail for this type of portfolio given the desired income level so with everything we've looked at so far the question is if James continues doing what he's currently doing and retires with the desired spending level the assets that he's accumulated living until age 90 what is the probability that he has success well it comes in at about 61 so that's probably not a good retirement number it's something we want to see if we can work to improve so I'm going to pull up the what if analysis here and start to look at some of these different decisions that we could make and see if we can get this probability to increase okay so now we have the what if analysis where we have two different columns up here on the board right now they're identical we're going to keep this one the same as the base case everything that we just went through but now we're going to start to change some of these variables to see what the impact those decisions have on the overall retirement plan and this is much more of an art at this stage than it is a science because we want to start to explore different scenarios and then see what is most comfortable for you once you understand the impact of these different decisions you can take some time to kind of way think about them weigh the the pros and cons and now we're starting to work together to craft you a retirement plan that gives us increased probabilities of success but also something that you feel very very comfortable with so the first couple of options we have which are the most simple and usually have the biggest impact on the plan is that we can either work longer or spend less so James says no I don't want to spend less I have a specific plan I want to get my RV I want to travel the country I want to play some golf I've done my budget I need to spend that 70 000 for the first 10 years so the first thing we'll look at is the impact of working another couple of years so I've changed the age here to 63 as far as Retirement the only variable we're going to change at this time I don't want to change too many variables at once I want to see the impact of different decisions how they impact the overall plan okay so that gives us a bit of an increase but the next thing I want to look at here is social security so Social Security is a very valuable source of guaranteed lifetime income first it's an increasing stream of income it increases with inflation but two no matter what happens with the stock market that income is always going to be coming in so instead of taking the 62 and having a significant reduction in the lifetime income that we receive because I don't want to change spending we still have the 50 and 20 in here I want to change the Social Security from taking it a 62 to taking it at full retirement age okay so changing the Social Security election day gets us up to 76 we're definitely moving in the right direction here after a conversation with James and he realizing that you know what I do feel really secure with that increased social security income because if the market doesn't cooperate I know I'm still going to have that much higher income later in life so that would lead us down the road to say okay let's look at adding more guaranteed lifetime income if we can get your Baseline income to cover a majority of your spending needs then we don't need the market to perform necessarily as well later in life so now we want to look at the impact of adding more guaranteed income to the plan which has the effect of providing more security later in life because if the markets don't cooperate we know we have a certain level of income being deposited every single month no matter how long we live so if you go to our website here it's Oak harvestfinancialgroup.com com we have up top an income writer quote where this is constantly searching for the highest amounts of guaranteed lifetime income that are available in the marketplace simply input the variables here so in Texas age 60 Ira money income starts we're going to start looking at seven years here and I know the dollar amount I would want to put in 300 000.

The good news here is you can input any of these different variables we don't ask for your information so it's a calculator tool that you can play with on your own Single Life payout and we get quote okay so here's the output screen we have all of these different companies over here when you see the same company twice it's because that company offers multiple different products with the same income Rider so an income writer is just an addendum or an attachment to a contract that guarantees no matter what the stock market does a certain amount of Lifetime income based on the specifications you input so about thirty three thousand dollars here so that's about 11 percent of the initial deposit with that income starting in year seven this is why we call it a deferred income annuity because it gets a guaranteed growth to calculate a guaranteed lifetime income that you then would incorporate into your plan so in this what-if analysis we come down here we I've already inputted so three hundred thousand dollars and then we just calculate these scenarios okay now we're up to 87 percent here so now things are starting to look a little bit better let's make a couple of different adjustments here because remember when I talked about the guard rails that's too aggressive of a portfolio given the income need especially in the beginning years but now that we've added some deferred income into the plan the portfolio's capacity for risk increases later in life and all that means is because there's so much income coming in the portfolio can withstand a bit more volatility later once Social Security and the Deferred income annuity kick on because you're needing to take less from the portfolio so let's make a couple more adjustments here so after retirement we don't want to keep the the current investment strategy let's get a little bit more conservative here go from an aggressive plan to something a little bit more conservative and then you know what let's also say now that we're starting to move in the right direction instead of retiring at 63 what happens if we retire at 62.

Get your retired one year earlier than some of these other numbers okay now we're at 83 percent retiring at 62. I want to look at one more variable here because you may want to get a part-time job James may want to be a starter at a golf course maybe he wants to work in the church and he can get ten thousand or fifteen thousand dollars a year maybe just wants to work two three months out of the year so the next thing I want to look at is if we've done all this now what happens if during this first 10 years of retirement he decides he wants to work three months out of the year or maybe just a part-time job and work one or two days a week so instead of needing twenty thousand dollars per year we just need another ten thousand let's say from the portfolio so really that's only earning ten thousand dollars extra in retirement income you could do that driving Uber many different choices there you know what I'm just going to decrease this no I'll leave it there now with James deciding to maybe work part-time here to reduce that spending need in the first 10 years let's see if we can also get them retired at 61.

Okay so now James has decided that working part-time and hey we're talking 10 grand here so this isn't a lot of money now I want to see what happens if we go back to the original goal that James had of retiring as soon as possible at age 61. so we're going to change this back to his original goal 61 calculate all scenarios and now this gets us up to 94 so we started at 61 if where James was originally at whenever he came in if he kept doing whatever he was already doing we got him up to 94 percent here okay I want to take a minute before we finish the final Concept in this video to discuss some of the adjustments we've made so far to get James from 61 to 94 so first and foremost we adjusted the Social Security election strategy secondly we added that deferred income annuity thirdly James has decided to work part-time to generate ten thousand dollars per year in those beginning years to help reduce the burden of taking out an additional twenty thousand dollars of retirement income and then finally we've brought the guardrails in on the Investment Portfolio which helps to eliminate very bad outcomes that could happen with his original 93 allocation to stocks we haven't totally went to bonds or cash we've just brought those guard rails in by reducing our Equity exposure in the beginning years of retirement we can always adjust that later now last thing I want to do is look at what we call the combined details all of these things together in a spreadsheet just so we can see how these different pieces are working together and then look at what we call different Monte Carlo analyzes so now I want to share with you some of the individual trial analysis that we run just like we would for a normal client to help identify not only where the weak spots are in the portfolio but how these different decisions that we're making impact the overall client balance and it's not just looking at what we call an average rate of return it's looking at a thousand different simulations we're going to look at a couple here and the Order of the return so check out the video if you want to understand more about this concept you can click the link up above and the title of the video is how eleven percent average returns could destroy your retirement and that'll really get home that concept of it's not about what you average but it's about the order in which you realize returns over the course of your retirement during the day distribution phase so here we have this individual trial and we're gonna it's the median scenario out of a thousand different scenarios so I just want to go through this fairly quickly with you and based on some of the adjustments to the portfolio we see the investment return column here so all of this I think averaged out to I think it was about four and a half percent gross returns I can go back and double check that in a second but you see it's it's never four four four four four four four four or six six six six this is what it looks like in the real world so James retires essentially the beginning of 2023 we have the Deferred income annuity clicking on here we've changed Social Security to click on here so if we add these two together come heck or high water there will be minimally 74 000 almost 75 000 deposited into his bank account every single year now if we look at the retirement need it's about sixty one thousand dollars plus the discretionary Go-Go spending is about twelve thousand two ninety nine so about seventy three thousand dollars but what this does is because we're getting so much from these two sources it really reduces the need for the portfolio to perform and if we kind of go out go on out through retirement you see Social Security isn't increasing income so later in life now we're up to about 89 almost 90 000 of income and our ninety thousand dollars inflation adjusted retirement income need is covered by the amount of guaranteed lifetime income that we have in the portfolio which then allows our portfolio balances to stabilize because we're not needing it to support our lifestyle later in life so this is just one example here but we see the ending portfolio value even though it spends down a little bit in the beginning years okay it starts to stabilize because the income provided from the decisions that we've made put us in a situation where we don't have to withdraw so much from the portfolio Okay so now I want to look at a different trial and just to confirm here the 500th scenario was an average of 4.6 but you saw the different order of those returns and how we actually got to 4.6 okay so if we slide this up here let's assume it's a pretty bad scenario this is going to let me change it here find a worse return okay so this brings the average down to 3.05 and we still see in bar graph form here that the portfolio value still is stabilized and it's primarily because that change in the Social Security decision and adding the Deferred income annuity it still puts us into that position to where if the market doesn't perform we have enough income from guaranteed sources that we're not dependent on the stock market to provide us income in retirement especially later in life when we typically are more conservative and most people that I've worked with don't have the same stomach at 80 or 82 to stay invested in Big Market pullbacks as they did when they were 52 or 62.

Now what I want to show you is the comparison to what we just looked at in the individual trial analysis to the original plan that came in at 61 percent with all the original inputs so if James just wanted to retire not go see anyone make any adjustments I want to show you what that looks like on the individual trial analysis so remember in this scenario we kept Social Security at 62 no job so the spending stayed at seventy thousand twenty thousand was that go go spending no change to the portfolio so we still have the aggressive portfolio which brings in the possibility of some pretty bad outcomes and no deferred income annuity here to help stabilize the income generation later in life as well as the volatility impact on the portfolio so when we when we look at this so here we go um had James has a 900 000.

You see we have none of the annuity income here Social Security starts out at about 26 000 for him a little more than two thousand a month now look at the investment returns here because it's a more aggressive portfolio the range the guard rails are increased here and then finally the spending we have the fifty thousand plus twenty thousand increasing for inflation with the Go-Go lasting 10 years so in the first 10 years of retirement we see things are going pretty well even at this spending level because we have some pretty good returns in here even though we have a couple bad years but what happens is the income because of inflation the income need increases later in life and we see it really just takes a couple of bad years here minus 21 minus 12 we go from a million to 755 and then it's pretty much all downhill from there in this particular scenario running out of income except for Social Security which is now only up to about forty four thousand dollars per year compared to the other plan with the Deferred Social Security so full retirement age and the Deferred income annuity we were at I wanted to say it was around 85 88 000 um of income not dependent on the stock market here we're only at 45 in the mid 80s so that means we have to take more out of the portfolio so it's more susceptible to bad returns later in retirement now the big takeaway here is this is what a good retirement planner does it's not necessarily about the investment returns it's about determining how much money you should have in the market when you should take Social Security we didn't even get into taxes here additional benefits could be provided through tax planning but what you should do with taxes and identifying those spending goals and those needs in order to get you retired and stay retired and then staying connected to this plan over time that's what a good retirement advisor does it's not about outperforming the market it's about finding a plan that gets you and keeps you retired just a brief reminder here to subscribe to the channel now what that does is that puts us in your TV Guide here on YouTube so it doesn't cost anything but if you subscribe to the channel you can come back to us much more easily down the road make sure to comment down below and also share this video with a friend or family member that you think could benefit from what we're talking about today [Music] foreign

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2 Retirement Tax Planning Strategies To Save THOUSANDS In Your Retirement Portfolio!

how would you like to save hundreds of thousands of dollars potentially in taxes in retirement well these two strategies I'm going to go through today when combined together have the potential to do just that now if you don't qualify for net unrealized appreciation because you don't have company stock inside your 401k you can still qualify for zero percent taxes on your long-term capital gains and dividends so when we combine these strategies together it creates a very powerful tax and income planning tool that you can use for your retirement [Music] foreign as you can tell I'm pretty excited about this video because we're going to discuss two tax planning strategies the net unrealized appreciation which I've not yet done a video on the YouTube channel about and also the zero percent taxation for long-term capital gains and dividends and you're going to want to stick around until the end of the video where I incorporate these two strategies into a real life financial planning case now unless you've searched net unrealized appreciation to find this video there's a pretty good chance you've never heard of net unrealized appreciation so in its most basic form it's when you have company stock that's been issued inside your 401k you have the option of rolling that money outside of your 401k not into an IRA but rolling it out only paying income tax on the basis that's been distributed and potentially pay long-term capital gains tax on the appreciation so that appreciation from where it was issued to where it is whenever you roll it out and retire or sever from service or become 59 and a half that's what's called your net unrealized appreciation we're here in Houston Texas where we have a lot of client clients that worked at Exxon Mobil or Chevron or some of the other big oil and gas companies we also have clients from all over the country that work for other companies that can take advantage of this net unrealized depreciation strategy so I'm going to use Exxon because we come across this plan a lot we're very familiar with the Exxon retirement plan and I want to illustrate how this concept works and there's some nuances here and there's also some financial planning considerations and of course tax ramifications that we're going to go through but if I worked at Exxon let's say from 1995 to 2020 and as part of my compensation I receive shares of stock each year over the course of my employment so these numbers are not historically accurate but I want to convey the the principle here so in the beginning years if Exxon was trading at twenty dollars and I received a hundred shares and then next year maybe I received them at 22 dollars per share and twenty five dollars per share and over time as I've received more shares as part of my compensation package the value has typically increases the price at which you were issued those shares in the year you received them is what's called your cost basis so if we do this Nua rollout that's the amount that you'll have to pay income taxes on but it's a really cool opportunity here because over time most stocks appreciate in value Exxon today is at a hundred and sixteen dollars per share so the concept of Nua is if I was issued stock at twenty dollars a share and I keep it in the IRA and now it's at 116 dollars a share that's a massive amount of capital appreciation and if I roll it to an IRA and distribute it at that point or at some point in the future I'm going to income taxes and that can can lead to a pretty big tax liability now we're down the road when I need income but if stocks appreciate it over time we typically have a mixed cost basis when it comes to the amount of shares that we've received from the company so first thing to know here and first thing to ask your company is do you guys provide a breakdown of the cost basis on an annual reporting period or do you take the average cost basis so we come across some companies here that they will provide you the information of the exact cost basis and the amount of shares that you've received in each year in that case we can really cherry pick which shares we want to roll out and really take advantage of this strategy because typically we're going to take the lower cost basis ones some companies don't allow you to cherry pick based on the lower basis shares that were issued they calculate an average cost basis for all the shares issued so this is not nearly as advantageous as being able to cherry pick sometimes it can still make sense especially if it's an older 401k or if it's a stock that has really really appreciated since those shares were issued in the average cost basis is down so this video my primary purpose is to help educate you around the financial planning considerations of the Nua rollout so I'm not going to cover all the rules and reg surrounding it I'll do that in a later video though but a couple things you should know this becomes an opportunity whenever you sever from service or typically when you're entering retirement there are some other qualifications but we'll cover those later now if you sever from service prior to age 55 you will be subject to a 10 penalty on the amount you distribute so just be aware that if you're under the age of 55 you've severed from service you have company stock inside your 401k that that 10 penalty for early distribution still applies we have Exxon this 401K here so the total value is about 1.5 million in this hypothetical example the shares the tote in totality the shares have been issued over the course of the working career equals about a six hundred thousand dollar cost basis so I'm going to use the example here where we can cherry pick the individual shares so the next question becomes which shares should I consider doing the Nua rollout because I don't have to roll all six hundred thousand basis out in the real world typically this 1.5 million of fair market value may also be comprised of mutual funds such as growth funds income Etc within the 401K for the purpose of this example Exxon stock is valued at 1.5 million dollars the cost basis of those Exxon shares within the 401K is 600 000.

Just want to point out in the real world typically everyone does not have all their money invested in their company stock but I've I've absolutely seen that over the years so the question becomes which shares do we want to take advantage of the annual rollout with the general rule of thumb is the lower cost basis Shares are more attractive and that's determined by the the value of the stock today anything above 50 percent cost basis to fair market value typically we don't want to consider for Nua now there are some extenuating circumstances sometimes with financial planning considerations that it may make sense but when we do the math and we extrapolate out looking at the value that you would have in the ira versus paying taxes on the basis now annual taxation for growth dividends Etc the Breakeven point isn't that attractive when we look at these shares that are above 50 percent cost basis to fair market value I personally like to see them around 20 or 30 percent really tops so whenever you have shares that are 10 15 20 25 cost basis to fair market value those are typically very attractive opportunities and in some situations Thirty thirty five forty percent could possibly make sense it just depends on the overall financial plan that you're putting together in other circumstances so this is a tax analysis so you may want to reach out to your CPA for help or assistance in doing this or your financial advisor if they're qualified and skilled enough to help you make these determinations I want to run through some numbers now so let's assume for whatever reason this person decides to do the whole Nua rollout so just so we understand the how this functionally works the 600 000 rolls out of the 401K into a non-ira account income tax is due on that six hundred thousand dollars you're probably looking at about a 27 28 maybe 30 percent effective tax rate we'll go with 30.

So 100 eighty thousand dollars of income taxes would be due on the basis being rolled out but in this scenario you're not just rolling out 600 000 That's the basis you're actually rolling 1.5 million dollars out of the 401K and only paying income tax on the basis now if you sell it immediately the net unrealized appreciation is the difference between the basis and the fair market value so you have nine hundred thousand dollars of gain there so if you sell that nine hundred thousand you're looking at the more preferential long-term capital gains tax that would be a pretty big tax still so the question becomes the are what planning considerations should we hold on to this stock do we feel comfortable having this much in one company what is our other wealth what if we break it out over a few years so this is what we're really going to dive into now I just want you to understand how this actually works in regards to the functionality okay let's cover how this actually works so we take the Exxon stock the basis is 600 000 but the full value is 1.5 million so if in this example we decide we want to do it all we would roll the full 1.5 million out of the 401K it will go into a non-ira account but you only owe income taxes on the basis the 600 000.

If you sell the stock immediately you will owe long-term capital gains tax which is a more preferential rate than income taxes at this level of income on the difference between the basis and the fair market value or nine hundred thousand there but you don't have to sell it right away if you don't sell it right away and then you sell it six months later you'll be subject to short-term capital gains tax because you're holding period rules take take into a place or taken to effect if you don't sell it immediately but if you wait 12 months after the distribution date 12 months in one day then you qualify for long-term capital gains tax treatment so some of the financial planning considerations are now what are the income taxes due what is my income and tax plan year one year two year three of retirement how does this fit into that overall tax and income plan and how do we optimize how do we reduce the total taxes we pay while maximizing the value that we retain if we have to pay income taxes on six hundred thousand dollars you're looking at an effective tax rate there of about 27 28 maybe 30 percent so 30 on 600 is a hundred and eighty Grand so you'd write that check to Uncle Sam and you would have 1.5 million outside of the 401K in the more preferential tax environment of long-term capital gains and dividends now you would have annual taxation on these dividends so that's something else we need to consider and we also need to consider future tax rates and make assumptions with what do we think income tax rates are going to be in the future long-term capital gains and dividend rates all of these things go into the analysis but for now this is the logistics of how it works we roll it all out pay income taxes on the basis we can either sell it immediately and pay long-term capital gains on the differential or we can hold it and if we hold it past the distribution date sell it within 12 months short-term capital gains sell it post 12 months long-term capital gains okay so I want to dive deeper into the two options we have just high level so option A is We Roll everything to the IRA we do not take advantage of the Nua rollout eligibility things that we have to consider here is future tax rates rmds other income sources and the secure act now this is not an exhaustive list this is just some of the big ones we have to take and consider future tax rates because when everything is inside that tax infested Ira when you distribute it in the future you have to pay income taxes you've given up the ability to take advantage of long-term capital gains and dividend taxes which are typically a preferential rate rmds Force distributions from your retirement account and when added with other income we oftentimes see people who did not plan for this have 150 200 250 even more of income because of required minimum distributions and their other income so when doing this analysis we have to extrapolate out and look at these factors to help make the decision today secure act I threw this in here because it forces distribution of your retirement accounts if they go to a non-spouse beneficiary that's more than 10 years younger than you full distribution of the retirement account within 10 years so if you have kids and it's important to leave this money to your children if they have income and they're working and now your retirement account has to be fully distributed within 10 years that could be a massive amount of income going on top of their income which now 30 40 50 60 potentially of your retirement account has gone to Uncle Sam if you live in a state with income taxes that could be an issue as well inheritance taxes so a lot of issues here rolling everything into the IRA you can be hit with um pretty big income taxes down the road option b is we do take advantage of the Nua rollout either wholly or in a partial Nua rollout how that works is we would take the shares that we do decide to take advantage of this strategy and we roll them into the non-ira account some things to consider there is that what are long-term capital gain rates now what are they possibly going to be in the future but also we have annual taxation of the dividends and if we're buying and selling inside that account whatever we do not roll into the non-ira account with the strategy the rest of the funds from your 401k go into the IRA and then of course whatever's left here we have the same considerations that I went through over here so now there are financial planning considerations here let's say I was at 35 cost basis to fair market value so I'm kind of right there where mathematically it may not make sense but how much non-qualified money do I have how much essentially I'm saying how much do you have outside of your retirement accounts because if you're entering retirement and all that money is inside that tax infested 401K then you don't have any ability to manipulate what goes on your 1040 your tax return by manipulate I mean we determine which accounts were withdrawing income from to manage our taxable income that we report to the IRS if we pull from our non-qualified accounts think your bank account well you don't have to report that so if you need a hundred thousand a year we pull 50 from your bank and 50 from your IRA you get your 100 000 but only fifty thousand goes on the tax return that's how we can manipulate that so how much non-qualified money do you have if you don't have much we may want to consider doing a little bit higher Nua rollout because even mathematically it may not make sense when we just compare that decision in isolation to do or not to do the Nua rollout but when we now look at the other benefits that we're receiving such as the ability to do Roth conversions the ability to manipulate what goes on our 1040 the ability to possibly qualify for a health care subsidy if you retire before the age of 65 by managing the reportable or taxable income that's reportable we can qualify for a subsidy so this is why we're so big on financial planning because as you can see it's not just about Investment Management in retirement that's important absolutely but when we tie in financial planning with Investment Management we can create some really optimal scenarios where we're creating a ton of value and helping you have more income pay less tax and ultimately have more value throughout the course of your retirement okay this is the part that I mentioned in the beginning of the video where we're going to tie into kind of a real world plan planning case so we laid the groundwork for what Nua is and some of the considerations that you have to make in order to determine if it makes sense for you to do the Nua rollout so what I want to point out here is the tax and income plan for retirement years one two and three for someone who takes advantage of the Nua rollout because the question becomes when do we sell that stock if we have 30 40 50 percent of our entire net worth in our company stock it's pretty risky to hold on to that position just so we don't pay more in taxes so here's where we're going to tie the financial planning considerations of the real world application and decisions we have to make on the Nua rollout with years one two and three of someone just entering retirement one of the big risks is if we roll it out the company's stock and we decide not to sell it because we don't want to pay the long-term capital gains immediately if we hold on to that that concentrated Equity position we have increased our risk now there are investment strategies that can be used such as buying a put option or what we call an Equity caller but I want to just talk about the tax and income plan here so in this scenario client rolls out the annual way so they have a large concentrated Equity position and they've paid income tax on the basis but do not want to sell the company stock yet so as part of the tax and income plan what I want to show you is we could break this up so year two year three and even year four possibly depending on the size of the concentrated Equity position Company stock where zero percent taxes essentially so we have total income here of a hundred and twenty thousand so what this is the tax and income strategy where we're generating income year two of retirement not year one because in year one you've done the the Nua rollout you have a big tax liability from paying income taxes on the cost basis of that company stock so here's your two so year two the the tax and income strategy is don't take anything out of the 401K no Roth conversions we're going to sell the company stock that we previously rolled out take advantage of Nua and we can have a hundred and twenty thousand dollars of income here as long as it's all capital gains and dividends your total tax liability 458 dollars now what I've done here is assumed twenty thousand dollars of dividends because if you have company stock and you roll it out it probably paid some dividends so 20K there and a hundred thousand of long-term capital gains we're realizing we're recognizing so this is darn near zero percent on a hundred and twenty thousand dollars of retirement income and we're divesting from that company stock now again some risk management strategies we could have an equity caller or put option helping to support downside volatility of that concentrated position but just taxing in complaining wise I want to show you how how this can work out so here now I've added 125 000 of long-term capital gains with twenty thousand dollars of dividends total AGI 145 000 the total tax 4208 on 145k of income 2.9 percent so again we've divested so maybe this is year two of retirement or year three we've divested from the company stock we've reduced our risk we've provided the income that we needed for retirement and we've done so in a way that's tax advantaged same thing goes on now I wanted to point this one out because I've here I've thrown in the same 20 000 of dividends 125 000 of long-term capital gains so we're selling the stock again but now we also take advantage of a twenty thousand dollar Ira distribution so this is which accounts do we pull income from in retirement how do we generate income what's the tax plan total AGI comes up to 165 the total tax is 7208 but here's the cool part the IRS ordering rules for how you pay tax on income based on where that income is generated the distribution from the IRA is actually tax-free but what happens is when you take money out of the IRA it brings some of those long-term capital gains into taxation so I did a video not too long ago where we talked about adjustments and Social Security and IRA distributions and wealth conversion taxes the tax code is filled with these where if we we take one more dollar of income it brings one other item into now a taxable State such as Social Security or long-term capital gains or dividends so just just be aware of that I guess 165 000 of income seven thousand two hundred and eight dollars in income taxes representing a four point four percent tax rate so now one two three four years into retirement we've divested the uh concentrated stock risk we provided income and a very tax advantaged manner we still have that Ira with a lot of money in it to deal with but once this is done we would probably at that point start down the Roth conversion path now every situation is different but hopefully these topics and ideas and and considerations when it comes to risk management income planning tax planning and retirement will help you have a better retirement if you want to learn in more detail how to potentially pay zero percent in long-term capital gains and on your dividends click this video right here I did a couple years ago where we do a deeper dive into the special tax advantage [Music] thank you

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Retirement: I’m 60 Years Old with $900K in Savings. Can I Retire Now? What is My Risk Capacity?

so you're 60 years old with nine hundred thousand dollars saved and the question is can you retire in today's video we're going to look at a few different decisions that could be made the impact those decisions have on the plan with the overall goal of not running out of money hi I'm Troy sharp CEO of Oak Harvest Financial Group a certified financial planner professional host of the retirement income show and a certified tax specialist in today's case study we're going to look at a situation that's not too dissimilar from what we normally encounter in our day-to-day operations here at Oak Harvest Financial Group so we have James who's 60 years old he comes in and he says Troy I want to spend about seventy thousand dollars and I'm just tired of working I want to to this year to be my last year so I want to spend seventy thousand dollars I think I'm going to live to about 90 years old pretty good health and I want this fifty thousand dollars to increase with inflation over the course of my retirement but for the first 10 years and what I hear you talk about in this go go spending phase I want to spend an additional 20 000 per year bringing that first 10 years of spending up to 70 000 per year then that go go spending goes away and then we have the inflation adjusted 50 000 to plan for from age 70 to age 90.

Hey just a brief Interruption here to ask you to subscribe to the channel now what that does for you is that puts us Oak Harvest Financial Group and all the content we produce in your little TV Guide so you have a much easier way to come back and find it later share this video with a friend or family member and also comment down below I love to respond to the comments now if you have any questions about your particular situation or you'd like to consider becoming a client of Oak Harvest feel free to reach out to us there's a link in the description below but you can always reach out to us and give us a call and have a conversation to see if we might be a good fit for each other James tells us that since he wants to retire as soon as possible he he thinks it makes sense to take Social Security the first time available so claiming at 62 a little more than two thousand dollars a month at twenty five thousand dollars per year he also has that nine hundred thousand dollars broken out to four 401K money of 700 Grand then 200 000 in a taxable account or what we call non-qualified outside of the retirement account very important to point out here that the tax characteristic of these two accounts and the Investments inside them and the interest and dividends and the withdrawals from them are taxed differently so that's part of an overall tax plan now James also has a home that's completely paid for and worth six hundred thousand dollars but he's told me that I don't want to use this to fund any of my retirement goals I've lived in this home for a long time I want to stay in the home but we know from a planning perspective that we do have that in our back pocket if it's needed down the road so James's total net worth here is about 1.5 million looking at the paid off home of six hundred thousand the 700 Grand inside the 401K and the 200 000 of non-qualified or taxable account assets now as part of the process to understand where someone is and where they're trying to get to we have to understand how is the portfolio currently allocated so James tells us that Troy I know I've wanted to retire so I've been investing aggressively and trying to get ahead of the game but here we are in 2022 and the markets have pulled back some so that double-edged sword is starting to kind of rear its rear its head but we see James's 93 stock so one of the questions that we have from an internal planning perspective is if we keep this same level of risk while we retire and start taking income out of the portfolio what does that do for what we call the risk capacity or the portfolio's ability to take on risk while Distributing income in the retirement phase so we have to look at the guard rails and guard rails are essentially a statistical calculation of probabilities of the portfolio returning this much on the high side and a good year and this much on the downside in a bad year if these guard rails are too far apart and we're taking in income out if we run into a bad couple of years that bump up against that bottom guardrail but we significantly increase the risk of running out of money so part of the analysis of the planning is is this an appropriate guard rail for this type of portfolio given the desired income level so with everything we've looked at so far the question is if James continues doing what he's currently doing and retires with the desired spending level the assets that he's accumulated living until age 90 what is the probability that he has success well it comes in at about 61 so that's probably not a good retirement number it's something we want to see if we can work to improve so I'm going to pull up the what if analysis here and start to look at some of these different decisions that we could make and see if we can get this probability to increase okay so now we have the what if analysis where we have two different columns up here on the board right now they're identical we're going to keep this one the same as the base case everything that we just went through but now we're going to start to change some of these variables to see what the impact those decisions have on the overall retirement plan and this is much more of an art at this stage than it is a science because we want to start to explore different scenarios and then see what is most comfortable for you once you understand the impact of these different decisions you can take some time to kind of way think about them weigh the the pros and cons and now we're starting to work together to craft you a retirement plan that gives us increased probabilities of success but also something that you feel very very comfortable with so the first couple of options we have which are the most simple and usually have the biggest impact on the plan is that we can either work longer or spend less so James says no I don't want to spend less I have a specific plan I want to get my RV I want to travel the country I want to play some golf I've done my budget I need to spend that 70 000 for the first 10 years so the first thing we'll look at is the impact of working another couple of years so I've changed the age here to 63 as far as Retirement the only variable we're going to change at this time I don't want to change too many variables at once I want to see the impact of different decisions how they impact the overall plan okay so that gives us a bit of an increase but the next thing I want to look at here is social security so Social Security is a very valuable source of guaranteed lifetime income first it's an increasing stream of income it increases with inflation but two no matter what happens with the stock market that income is always going to be coming in so instead of taking the 62 and having a significant reduction in the lifetime income that we receive because I don't want to change spending we still have the 50 and 20 in here I want to change the Social Security from taking it a 62 to taking it at full retirement age okay so changing the Social Security election day gets us up to 76 we're definitely moving in the right direction here after a conversation with James and he realizing that you know what I do feel really secure with that increased social security income because if the market doesn't cooperate I know I'm still going to have that much higher income later in life so that would lead us down the road to say okay let's look at adding more guaranteed lifetime income if we can get your Baseline income to cover a majority of your spending needs then we don't need the market to perform necessarily as well later in life so now we want to look at the impact of adding more guaranteed income to the plan which has the effect of providing more security later in life because if the markets don't cooperate we know we have a certain level of income being deposited every single month no matter how long we live so if you go to our website here it's Oak harvestfinancialgroup.com com we have up top an income writer quote where this is constantly searching for the highest amounts of guaranteed lifetime income that are available in the marketplace simply input the variables here so in Texas age 60 Ira money income starts we're going to start looking at seven years here and I know the dollar amount I would want to put in 300 000.

The good news here is you can input any of these different variables we don't ask for your information so it's a calculator tool that you can play with on your own Single Life payout and we get quote okay so here's the output screen we have all of these different companies over here when you see the same company twice it's because that company offers multiple different products with the same income Rider so an income writer is just an addendum or an attachment to a contract that guarantees no matter what the stock market does a certain amount of Lifetime income based on the specifications you input so about thirty three thousand dollars here so that's about 11 percent of the initial deposit with that income starting in year seven this is why we call it a deferred income annuity because it gets a guaranteed growth to calculate a guaranteed lifetime income that you then would incorporate into your plan so in this what-if analysis we come down here we I've already inputted so three hundred thousand dollars and then we just calculate these scenarios okay now we're up to 87 percent here so now things are starting to look a little bit better let's make a couple of different adjustments here because remember when I talked about the guard rails that's too aggressive of a portfolio given the income need especially in the beginning years but now that we've added some deferred income into the plan the portfolio's capacity for risk increases later in life and all that means is because there's so much income coming in the portfolio can withstand a bit more volatility later once Social Security and the Deferred income annuity kick on because you're needing to take less from the portfolio so let's make a couple more adjustments here so after retirement we don't want to keep the the current investment strategy let's get a little bit more conservative here go from an aggressive plan to something a little bit more conservative and then you know what let's also say now that we're starting to move in the right direction instead of retiring at 63 what happens if we retire at 62.

Get your retired one year earlier than some of these other numbers okay now we're at 83 percent retiring at 62. I want to look at one more variable here because you may want to get a part-time job James may want to be a starter at a golf course maybe he wants to work in the church and he can get ten thousand or fifteen thousand dollars a year maybe just wants to work two three months out of the year so the next thing I want to look at is if we've done all this now what happens if during this first 10 years of retirement he decides he wants to work three months out of the year or maybe just a part-time job and work one or two days a week so instead of needing twenty thousand dollars per year we just need another ten thousand let's say from the portfolio so really that's only earning ten thousand dollars extra in retirement income you could do that driving Uber many different choices there you know what I'm just going to decrease this no I'll leave it there now with James deciding to maybe work part-time here to reduce that spending need in the first 10 years let's see if we can also get them retired at 61.

Okay so now James has decided that working part-time and hey we're talking 10 grand here so this isn't a lot of money now I want to see what happens if we go back to the original goal that James had of retiring as soon as possible at age 61. so we're going to change this back to his original goal 61 calculate all scenarios and now this gets us up to 94 so we started at 61 if where James was originally at whenever he came in if he kept doing whatever he was already doing we got him up to 94 percent here okay I want to take a minute before we finish the final Concept in this video to discuss some of the adjustments we've made so far to get James from 61 to 94 so first and foremost we adjusted the Social Security election strategy secondly we added that deferred income annuity thirdly James has decided to work part-time to generate ten thousand dollars per year in those beginning years to help reduce the burden of taking out an additional twenty thousand dollars of retirement income and then finally we've brought the guardrails in on the Investment Portfolio which helps to eliminate very bad outcomes that could happen with his original 93 allocation to stocks we haven't totally went to bonds or cash we've just brought those guard rails in by reducing our Equity exposure in the beginning years of retirement we can always adjust that later now last thing I want to do is look at what we call the combined details all of these things together in a spreadsheet just so we can see how these different pieces are working together and then look at what we call different Monte Carlo analyzes so now I want to share with you some of the individual trial analysis that we run just like we would for a normal client to help identify not only where the weak spots are in the portfolio but how these different decisions that we're making impact the overall client balance and it's not just looking at what we call an average rate of return it's looking at a thousand different simulations we're going to look at a couple here and the Order of the return so check out the video if you want to understand more about this concept you can click the link up above and the title of the video is how eleven percent average returns could destroy your retirement and that'll really get home that concept of it's not about what you average but it's about the order in which you realize returns over the course of your retirement during the day distribution phase so here we have this individual trial and we're gonna it's the median scenario out of a thousand different scenarios so I just want to go through this fairly quickly with you and based on some of the adjustments to the portfolio we see the investment return column here so all of this I think averaged out to I think it was about four and a half percent gross returns I can go back and double check that in a second but you see it's it's never four four four four four four four four or six six six six this is what it looks like in the real world so James retires essentially the beginning of 2023 we have the Deferred income annuity clicking on here we've changed Social Security to click on here so if we add these two together come heck or high water there will be minimally 74 000 almost 75 000 deposited into his bank account every single year now if we look at the retirement need it's about sixty one thousand dollars plus the discretionary Go-Go spending is about twelve thousand two ninety nine so about seventy three thousand dollars but what this does is because we're getting so much from these two sources it really reduces the need for the portfolio to perform and if we kind of go out go on out through retirement you see Social Security isn't increasing income so later in life now we're up to about 89 almost 90 000 of income and our ninety thousand dollars inflation adjusted retirement income need is covered by the amount of guaranteed lifetime income that we have in the portfolio which then allows our portfolio balances to stabilize because we're not needing it to support our lifestyle later in life so this is just one example here but we see the ending portfolio value even though it spends down a little bit in the beginning years okay it starts to stabilize because the income provided from the decisions that we've made put us in a situation where we don't have to withdraw so much from the portfolio Okay so now I want to look at a different trial and just to confirm here the 500th scenario was an average of 4.6 but you saw the different order of those returns and how we actually got to 4.6 okay so if we slide this up here let's assume it's a pretty bad scenario this is going to let me change it here find a worse return okay so this brings the average down to 3.05 and we still see in bar graph form here that the portfolio value still is stabilized and it's primarily because that change in the Social Security decision and adding the Deferred income annuity it still puts us into that position to where if the market doesn't perform we have enough income from guaranteed sources that we're not dependent on the stock market to provide us income in retirement especially later in life when we typically are more conservative and most people that I've worked with don't have the same stomach at 80 or 82 to stay invested in Big Market pullbacks as they did when they were 52 or 62.

Now what I want to show you is the comparison to what we just looked at in the individual trial analysis to the original plan that came in at 61 percent with all the original inputs so if James just wanted to retire not go see anyone make any adjustments I want to show you what that looks like on the individual trial analysis so remember in this scenario we kept Social Security at 62 no job so the spending stayed at seventy thousand twenty thousand was that go go spending no change to the portfolio so we still have the aggressive portfolio which brings in the possibility of some pretty bad outcomes and no deferred income annuity here to help stabilize the income generation later in life as well as the volatility impact on the portfolio so when we when we look at this so here we go um had James has a 900 000.

You see we have none of the annuity income here Social Security starts out at about 26 000 for him a little more than two thousand a month now look at the investment returns here because it's a more aggressive portfolio the range the guard rails are increased here and then finally the spending we have the fifty thousand plus twenty thousand increasing for inflation with the Go-Go lasting 10 years so in the first 10 years of retirement we see things are going pretty well even at this spending level because we have some pretty good returns in here even though we have a couple bad years but what happens is the income because of inflation the income need increases later in life and we see it really just takes a couple of bad years here minus 21 minus 12 we go from a million to 755 and then it's pretty much all downhill from there in this particular scenario running out of income except for Social Security which is now only up to about forty four thousand dollars per year compared to the other plan with the Deferred Social Security so full retirement age and the Deferred income annuity we were at I wanted to say it was around 85 88 000 um of income not dependent on the stock market here we're only at 45 in the mid 80s so that means we have to take more out of the portfolio so it's more susceptible to bad returns later in retirement now the big takeaway here is this is what a good retirement planner does it's not necessarily about the investment returns it's about determining how much money you should have in the market when you should take Social Security we didn't even get into taxes here additional benefits could be provided through tax planning but what you should do with taxes and identifying those spending goals and those needs in order to get you retired and stay retired and then staying connected to this plan over time that's what a good retirement advisor does it's not about outperforming the market it's about finding a plan that gets you and keeps you retired just a brief reminder here to subscribe to the channel now what that does is that puts us in your TV Guide here on YouTube so it doesn't cost anything but if you subscribe to the channel you can come back to us much more easily down the road make sure to comment down below and also share this video with a friend or family member that you think could benefit from what we're talking about today [Music] foreign

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2 Retirement Tax Planning Strategies To Save THOUSANDS In Your Retirement Portfolio!

how would you like to save hundreds of thousands of dollars potentially in taxes in retirement well these two strategies I'm going to go through today when combined together have the potential to do just that now if you don't qualify for net unrealized appreciation because you don't have company stock inside your 401k you can still qualify for zero percent taxes on your long-term capital gains and dividends so when we combine these strategies together it creates a very powerful tax and income planning tool that you can use for your retirement [Music] foreign as you can tell I'm pretty excited about this video because we're going to discuss two tax planning strategies the net unrealized appreciation which I've not yet done a video on the YouTube channel about and also the zero percent taxation for long-term capital gains and dividends and you're going to want to stick around until the end of the video where I incorporate these two strategies into a real life financial planning case now unless you've searched net unrealized appreciation to find this video there's a pretty good chance you've never heard of net unrealized appreciation so in its most basic form it's when you have company stock that's been issued inside your 401k you have the option of rolling that money outside of your 401k not into an IRA but rolling it out only paying income tax on the basis that's been distributed and potentially pay long-term capital gains tax on the appreciation so that appreciation from where it was issued to where it is whenever you roll it out and retire or sever from service or become 59 and a half that's what's called your net unrealized appreciation we're here in Houston Texas where we have a lot of client clients that worked at Exxon Mobil or Chevron or some of the other big oil and gas companies we also have clients from all over the country that work for other companies that can take advantage of this net unrealized depreciation strategy so I'm going to use Exxon because we come across this plan a lot we're very familiar with the Exxon retirement plan and I want to illustrate how this concept works and there's some nuances here and there's also some financial planning considerations and of course tax ramifications that we're going to go through but if I worked at Exxon let's say from 1995 to 2020 and as part of my compensation I receive shares of stock each year over the course of my employment so these numbers are not historically accurate but I want to convey the the principle here so in the beginning years if Exxon was trading at twenty dollars and I received a hundred shares and then next year maybe I received them at 22 dollars per share and twenty five dollars per share and over time as I've received more shares as part of my compensation package the value has typically increases the price at which you were issued those shares in the year you received them is what's called your cost basis so if we do this Nua rollout that's the amount that you'll have to pay income taxes on but it's a really cool opportunity here because over time most stocks appreciate in value Exxon today is at a hundred and sixteen dollars per share so the concept of Nua is if I was issued stock at twenty dollars a share and I keep it in the IRA and now it's at 116 dollars a share that's a massive amount of capital appreciation and if I roll it to an IRA and distribute it at that point or at some point in the future I'm going to income taxes and that can can lead to a pretty big tax liability now we're down the road when I need income but if stocks appreciate it over time we typically have a mixed cost basis when it comes to the amount of shares that we've received from the company so first thing to know here and first thing to ask your company is do you guys provide a breakdown of the cost basis on an annual reporting period or do you take the average cost basis so we come across some companies here that they will provide you the information of the exact cost basis and the amount of shares that you've received in each year in that case we can really cherry pick which shares we want to roll out and really take advantage of this strategy because typically we're going to take the lower cost basis ones some companies don't allow you to cherry pick based on the lower basis shares that were issued they calculate an average cost basis for all the shares issued so this is not nearly as advantageous as being able to cherry pick sometimes it can still make sense especially if it's an older 401k or if it's a stock that has really really appreciated since those shares were issued in the average cost basis is down so this video my primary purpose is to help educate you around the financial planning considerations of the Nua rollout so I'm not going to cover all the rules and reg surrounding it I'll do that in a later video though but a couple things you should know this becomes an opportunity whenever you sever from service or typically when you're entering retirement there are some other qualifications but we'll cover those later now if you sever from service prior to age 55 you will be subject to a 10 penalty on the amount you distribute so just be aware that if you're under the age of 55 you've severed from service you have company stock inside your 401k that that 10 penalty for early distribution still applies we have Exxon this 401K here so the total value is about 1.5 million in this hypothetical example the shares the tote in totality the shares have been issued over the course of the working career equals about a six hundred thousand dollar cost basis so I'm going to use the example here where we can cherry pick the individual shares so the next question becomes which shares should I consider doing the Nua rollout because I don't have to roll all six hundred thousand basis out in the real world typically this 1.5 million of fair market value may also be comprised of mutual funds such as growth funds income Etc within the 401K for the purpose of this example Exxon stock is valued at 1.5 million dollars the cost basis of those Exxon shares within the 401K is 600 000.

Just want to point out in the real world typically everyone does not have all their money invested in their company stock but I've I've absolutely seen that over the years so the question becomes which shares do we want to take advantage of the annual rollout with the general rule of thumb is the lower cost basis Shares are more attractive and that's determined by the the value of the stock today anything above 50 percent cost basis to fair market value typically we don't want to consider for Nua now there are some extenuating circumstances sometimes with financial planning considerations that it may make sense but when we do the math and we extrapolate out looking at the value that you would have in the ira versus paying taxes on the basis now annual taxation for growth dividends Etc the Breakeven point isn't that attractive when we look at these shares that are above 50 percent cost basis to fair market value I personally like to see them around 20 or 30 percent really tops so whenever you have shares that are 10 15 20 25 cost basis to fair market value those are typically very attractive opportunities and in some situations Thirty thirty five forty percent could possibly make sense it just depends on the overall financial plan that you're putting together in other circumstances so this is a tax analysis so you may want to reach out to your CPA for help or assistance in doing this or your financial advisor if they're qualified and skilled enough to help you make these determinations I want to run through some numbers now so let's assume for whatever reason this person decides to do the whole Nua rollout so just so we understand the how this functionally works the 600 000 rolls out of the 401K into a non-ira account income tax is due on that six hundred thousand dollars you're probably looking at about a 27 28 maybe 30 percent effective tax rate we'll go with 30.

So 100 eighty thousand dollars of income taxes would be due on the basis being rolled out but in this scenario you're not just rolling out 600 000 That's the basis you're actually rolling 1.5 million dollars out of the 401K and only paying income tax on the basis now if you sell it immediately the net unrealized appreciation is the difference between the basis and the fair market value so you have nine hundred thousand dollars of gain there so if you sell that nine hundred thousand you're looking at the more preferential long-term capital gains tax that would be a pretty big tax still so the question becomes the are what planning considerations should we hold on to this stock do we feel comfortable having this much in one company what is our other wealth what if we break it out over a few years so this is what we're really going to dive into now I just want you to understand how this actually works in regards to the functionality okay let's cover how this actually works so we take the Exxon stock the basis is 600 000 but the full value is 1.5 million so if in this example we decide we want to do it all we would roll the full 1.5 million out of the 401K it will go into a non-ira account but you only owe income taxes on the basis the 600 000.

If you sell the stock immediately you will owe long-term capital gains tax which is a more preferential rate than income taxes at this level of income on the difference between the basis and the fair market value or nine hundred thousand there but you don't have to sell it right away if you don't sell it right away and then you sell it six months later you'll be subject to short-term capital gains tax because you're holding period rules take take into a place or taken to effect if you don't sell it immediately but if you wait 12 months after the distribution date 12 months in one day then you qualify for long-term capital gains tax treatment so some of the financial planning considerations are now what are the income taxes due what is my income and tax plan year one year two year three of retirement how does this fit into that overall tax and income plan and how do we optimize how do we reduce the total taxes we pay while maximizing the value that we retain if we have to pay income taxes on six hundred thousand dollars you're looking at an effective tax rate there of about 27 28 maybe 30 percent so 30 on 600 is a hundred and eighty Grand so you'd write that check to Uncle Sam and you would have 1.5 million outside of the 401K in the more preferential tax environment of long-term capital gains and dividends now you would have annual taxation on these dividends so that's something else we need to consider and we also need to consider future tax rates and make assumptions with what do we think income tax rates are going to be in the future long-term capital gains and dividend rates all of these things go into the analysis but for now this is the logistics of how it works we roll it all out pay income taxes on the basis we can either sell it immediately and pay long-term capital gains on the differential or we can hold it and if we hold it past the distribution date sell it within 12 months short-term capital gains sell it post 12 months long-term capital gains okay so I want to dive deeper into the two options we have just high level so option A is We Roll everything to the IRA we do not take advantage of the Nua rollout eligibility things that we have to consider here is future tax rates rmds other income sources and the secure act now this is not an exhaustive list this is just some of the big ones we have to take and consider future tax rates because when everything is inside that tax infested Ira when you distribute it in the future you have to pay income taxes you've given up the ability to take advantage of long-term capital gains and dividend taxes which are typically a preferential rate rmds Force distributions from your retirement account and when added with other income we oftentimes see people who did not plan for this have 150 200 250 even more of income because of required minimum distributions and their other income so when doing this analysis we have to extrapolate out and look at these factors to help make the decision today secure act I threw this in here because it forces distribution of your retirement accounts if they go to a non-spouse beneficiary that's more than 10 years younger than you full distribution of the retirement account within 10 years so if you have kids and it's important to leave this money to your children if they have income and they're working and now your retirement account has to be fully distributed within 10 years that could be a massive amount of income going on top of their income which now 30 40 50 60 potentially of your retirement account has gone to Uncle Sam if you live in a state with income taxes that could be an issue as well inheritance taxes so a lot of issues here rolling everything into the IRA you can be hit with um pretty big income taxes down the road option b is we do take advantage of the Nua rollout either wholly or in a partial Nua rollout how that works is we would take the shares that we do decide to take advantage of this strategy and we roll them into the non-ira account some things to consider there is that what are long-term capital gain rates now what are they possibly going to be in the future but also we have annual taxation of the dividends and if we're buying and selling inside that account whatever we do not roll into the non-ira account with the strategy the rest of the funds from your 401k go into the IRA and then of course whatever's left here we have the same considerations that I went through over here so now there are financial planning considerations here let's say I was at 35 cost basis to fair market value so I'm kind of right there where mathematically it may not make sense but how much non-qualified money do I have how much essentially I'm saying how much do you have outside of your retirement accounts because if you're entering retirement and all that money is inside that tax infested 401K then you don't have any ability to manipulate what goes on your 1040 your tax return by manipulate I mean we determine which accounts were withdrawing income from to manage our taxable income that we report to the IRS if we pull from our non-qualified accounts think your bank account well you don't have to report that so if you need a hundred thousand a year we pull 50 from your bank and 50 from your IRA you get your 100 000 but only fifty thousand goes on the tax return that's how we can manipulate that so how much non-qualified money do you have if you don't have much we may want to consider doing a little bit higher Nua rollout because even mathematically it may not make sense when we just compare that decision in isolation to do or not to do the Nua rollout but when we now look at the other benefits that we're receiving such as the ability to do Roth conversions the ability to manipulate what goes on our 1040 the ability to possibly qualify for a health care subsidy if you retire before the age of 65 by managing the reportable or taxable income that's reportable we can qualify for a subsidy so this is why we're so big on financial planning because as you can see it's not just about Investment Management in retirement that's important absolutely but when we tie in financial planning with Investment Management we can create some really optimal scenarios where we're creating a ton of value and helping you have more income pay less tax and ultimately have more value throughout the course of your retirement okay this is the part that I mentioned in the beginning of the video where we're going to tie into kind of a real world plan planning case so we laid the groundwork for what Nua is and some of the considerations that you have to make in order to determine if it makes sense for you to do the Nua rollout so what I want to point out here is the tax and income plan for retirement years one two and three for someone who takes advantage of the Nua rollout because the question becomes when do we sell that stock if we have 30 40 50 percent of our entire net worth in our company stock it's pretty risky to hold on to that position just so we don't pay more in taxes so here's where we're going to tie the financial planning considerations of the real world application and decisions we have to make on the Nua rollout with years one two and three of someone just entering retirement one of the big risks is if we roll it out the company's stock and we decide not to sell it because we don't want to pay the long-term capital gains immediately if we hold on to that that concentrated Equity position we have increased our risk now there are investment strategies that can be used such as buying a put option or what we call an Equity caller but I want to just talk about the tax and income plan here so in this scenario client rolls out the annual way so they have a large concentrated Equity position and they've paid income tax on the basis but do not want to sell the company stock yet so as part of the tax and income plan what I want to show you is we could break this up so year two year three and even year four possibly depending on the size of the concentrated Equity position Company stock where zero percent taxes essentially so we have total income here of a hundred and twenty thousand so what this is the tax and income strategy where we're generating income year two of retirement not year one because in year one you've done the the Nua rollout you have a big tax liability from paying income taxes on the cost basis of that company stock so here's your two so year two the the tax and income strategy is don't take anything out of the 401K no Roth conversions we're going to sell the company stock that we previously rolled out take advantage of Nua and we can have a hundred and twenty thousand dollars of income here as long as it's all capital gains and dividends your total tax liability 458 dollars now what I've done here is assumed twenty thousand dollars of dividends because if you have company stock and you roll it out it probably paid some dividends so 20K there and a hundred thousand of long-term capital gains we're realizing we're recognizing so this is darn near zero percent on a hundred and twenty thousand dollars of retirement income and we're divesting from that company stock now again some risk management strategies we could have an equity caller or put option helping to support downside volatility of that concentrated position but just taxing in complaining wise I want to show you how how this can work out so here now I've added 125 000 of long-term capital gains with twenty thousand dollars of dividends total AGI 145 000 the total tax 4208 on 145k of income 2.9 percent so again we've divested so maybe this is year two of retirement or year three we've divested from the company stock we've reduced our risk we've provided the income that we needed for retirement and we've done so in a way that's tax advantaged same thing goes on now I wanted to point this one out because I've here I've thrown in the same 20 000 of dividends 125 000 of long-term capital gains so we're selling the stock again but now we also take advantage of a twenty thousand dollar Ira distribution so this is which accounts do we pull income from in retirement how do we generate income what's the tax plan total AGI comes up to 165 the total tax is 7208 but here's the cool part the IRS ordering rules for how you pay tax on income based on where that income is generated the distribution from the IRA is actually tax-free but what happens is when you take money out of the IRA it brings some of those long-term capital gains into taxation so I did a video not too long ago where we talked about adjustments and Social Security and IRA distributions and wealth conversion taxes the tax code is filled with these where if we we take one more dollar of income it brings one other item into now a taxable State such as Social Security or long-term capital gains or dividends so just just be aware of that I guess 165 000 of income seven thousand two hundred and eight dollars in income taxes representing a four point four percent tax rate so now one two three four years into retirement we've divested the uh concentrated stock risk we provided income and a very tax advantaged manner we still have that Ira with a lot of money in it to deal with but once this is done we would probably at that point start down the Roth conversion path now every situation is different but hopefully these topics and ideas and and considerations when it comes to risk management income planning tax planning and retirement will help you have a better retirement if you want to learn in more detail how to potentially pay zero percent in long-term capital gains and on your dividends click this video right here I did a couple years ago where we do a deeper dive into the special tax advantage [Music] thank you

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Retirement: I’m 60 Years Old with $900K in Savings. Can I Retire Now? What is My Risk Capacity?

Hey simply a short Disturbance right here to ask you to subscribe to the channel now what that does for you is that places us Oak Harvest Financial Team and also all the material we produce in your little TV Overview so you have a much simpler means to come back and find it later share this video with a good friend or family participant and likewise comment down below I enjoy to respond to the comments now if you have any concerns concerning your particular circumstance or you'' d like to consider ending up being a client of Oak Harvest really feel complimentary to get to out to us there'' s a link in the summary listed below however you can always reach out to us and also provide us a call and have a discussion to see if we may be a great fit for each various other James informs us that given that he desires to retire as quickly as feasible he he thinks it makes sense to take Social Protection the very first time readily available so declaring at 62 a little even more than two thousand dollars a month at twenty five thousand dollars per year he additionally has that nine hundred thousand bucks damaged out to 4 401K money of 700 Grand after that 200 000 in a taxable account or what we call non-qualified outside of the retired life account extremely vital to aim out below that the tax characteristic of these two accounts and the Investments inside them as well as the rate of interest and also dividends as well as the withdrawals from them are taxed in different ways so that'' s component of a total tax obligation plan currently James also has a residence that ' s totally paid for and also worth six hundred thousand dollars yet he'' s told me that I put on'' t desire to utilize this to fund any of my retirement goals I'' ve lived in this residence for a long time I desire to remain in the residence however we understand from a preparation point of view that we do have that in our back pocket if it'' s needed down the roadway so James'' s overall web worth right here is about 1.5 million looking at the paid off house of 6 hundred thousand the 700 Grand inside the 401K and the 200 000 of non-qualified or taxable account properties currently as part of the process to comprehend where somebody is and where they'' re attempting to get to we have to understand just how is the profile currently alloted so James informs us that Troy I understand I'' ve wanted to retire so I'' ve been spending boldy and attempting to get in advance of the game yet here we are in 2022 as well as the markets have actually pulled back some so that double-edged sword is starting to kind of back its back its head yet we see James'' s 93 supply so one of the concerns that we have from an inner planning perspective is if we maintain this very same degree of threat while we retire and begin taking revenue out of the profile what does that do for what we call the risk capacity or the profile'' s ability to take on danger while Distributing revenue in the retired life phase so we have to look at the guard rails as well as guard rails are essentially an analytical calculation of likelihoods of the portfolio returning this much on the high side and also a great year and also this much on the drawback in a poor year if these guard rails are as well far apart and also we'' re taking in income out if we run right into a bad pair of years that bump up against that bottom guardrail however we dramatically raise the risk of running out of cash so part of the analysis of the planning is is this a proper guard rail for this kind of profile given the preferred revenue level so with every little thing we'' ve looked at so much the question is if James continues doing what he'' s presently doing and also retires with the desired investing degree the possessions that he'' s gathered living until age 90 what is the likelihood that he has success well it comes in at regarding 61 so that'' s possibly not a great retirement number it'' s something we want to see if we can function to boost so I ' m going to pull up the what if evaluation here as well as start to look at some of these different decisions that we might make and also see if we can obtain this probability to enhance all right so currently we have the what if evaluation where we have 2 different columns up right here on the board right currently they'' re similar we ' re going to maintain this one the same as the base situation every little thing that we simply went via however now we'' re going to begin to change some of these variables to see what the impact those choices have on the total retired life strategy and this is much even more of an art at this phase than it is a scientific research due to the fact that we want to begin to check out different situations and also then see what is most comfortable for you once you comprehend the effect of these various decisions you can take some time to kind of method assume about them evaluate the the pros and disadvantages and also now we'' re beginning to work with each other to craft you a retired life plan that provides us boosted likelihoods of success however also something that you feel really really comfy with so the first couple of choices we have which are the most easy as well as typically have the biggest effect on the strategy is that we can either function longer or invest much less so James states no I wear'' t desire to spend less I have a specific plan I desire to get my Recreational vehicle I desire to travel the nation I want to play some golf I'' ve done my spending plan I need to invest that 70 000 for the first 10 years so the initial thing we'' ll appearance at is the influence of functioning another couple of years so I'' ve altered the age right here to 63 as much as Retirement the only variable we'' re going to alter at this time I don'' t want to transform as well lots of variables at once I want to see the influence of different choices exactly how they affect the general plan alright so that gives us a little bit of an increase however the following point I desire to look at right here is social safety and security so Social Safety is a really beneficial resource of guaranteed lifetime earnings initially it'' s a raising stream of earnings it increases with rising cost of living but two no matter what takes place with the stock market that earnings is always going to be coming in so rather of taking the 62 and also having a substantial decrease in the life time income that we receive due to the fact that I don'' t want to transform investing we still have the 50 and also 20 in below I desire to transform the Social Safety and security from taking it a 62 to taking it at full retired life age all right so altering the Social Security election day gets us up to 76 we'' re certainly moving in the best instructions right here after a discussion with James as well as he understanding that you recognize what I do feel truly safe and secure with that enhanced social security revenue due to the fact that if the market doesn'' t comply I'recognize I ' m still going to have that a lot greater revenue later on in life so that would certainly lead us down the roadway to say fine let'' s look at adding extra guaranteed lifetime earnings if we can obtain your Baseline income to cover a majority of your spending requires after that we put on'' t require the market to carry out necessarily as well later in life so now we desire to look at the effect of adding more surefire earnings to the strategy which has the effect of providing even more safety later on in life because if the markets put on'' t coordinate we know we have a specific level of revenue being deposited every single month no matter exactly how long we live so if you go to our web site here it'' s Oak harvestfinancialgroup.com com we have up leading an income author quote where this is continuously looking for the highest possible amounts of assured life time earnings that are available in the industry simply input the variables here so in Texas age 60 Individual retirement account money income starts we ' re going to start looking at seven years below and I recognize the buck quantity I would certainly desire to place in 300 000. I want to look at one more variable right here since you may want to get a part-time job James might want to be a starter at a golf course perhaps he wants to work in the church and he can get ten thousand or fifteen thousand dollars a year maybe just desires to function 2 3 months out of the year so the next point I want to look at is if we ' ve done all this now what occurs if throughout this very first 10 years of retirement he chooses he desires to function 3 months out of the year or maybe simply a part-time work as well as work one or 2 days a week so instead of needing twenty thousand dollars per year we simply need another 10 thousand allowed ' s say from the profile so actually that ' s just gaining ten thousand bucks extra in retired life income you might do that driving Uber many various selections there you understand what I ' m just going to reduce this no I ' ll leave it there now with James deciding to perhaps work part-time right here to reduce that investing demand in the initial 10 years allow ' s see if we can likewise get them retired at 61. We'' re going to transform this back to his original objective 61 determine all situations as well as now this gets us up to 94 so we started at 61 if where James was originally at whenever he came in if he maintained doing whatever he was currently doing we obtained him up to 94 percent below alright I desire to take a minute before we finish the last Concept in this video clip to discuss some of the modifications we ' ve made so much to get James from 61 to 94 so initial and also primary we readjusted the Social Safety and security election strategy second of all we included that deferred earnings annuity thirdly James has chosen to work part-time to produce ten thousand dollars per year in those beginning years to help reduce the concern of taking out an extra twenty thousand dollars of retired life revenue and after that finally we ' ve brought the guardrails in on the Financial investment Portfolio which helps to remove extremely bad end results that might happen with his initial 93 allotment to supplies we haven ' t entirely went to bonds or cash we ' ve simply brought those guard rails in by decreasing our Equity direct exposure in the starting years of retirement we can constantly change that later on currently last thing I want to do is look at what we call the mixed information all of these things with each other in a spread sheet just so we'can see just how these different pieces are working with each other as well as after that look at what we call different Monte Carlo analyzes so currently I want to share with you some of the specific test evaluation that we run simply like we would certainly for a typical customer to assist recognize not only where the weak areas are in the profile however just how these different decisions that we ' re making impact the overall client equilibrium and it ' s not just looking at what we call a typical price of return it ' s looking at a thousand different simulations we ' re going to look at a pair right here and also the Order of the return so inspect out the video if you want to recognize even more'regarding this principle you can click the web link up above and also the title of the video clip is how eleven percent average returns could destroy your retirement as well as that ' ll really get home that idea of it ' s not about what you balance yet it ' s regarding the order in which you recognize returns over the course of your retired life during the day distribution phase so here we have this private test and also we ' re gon na it ' s the average circumstance out of a thousand different situations so I simply want to go'with this rather swiftly with you as well as based on some of the adjustments to the portfolio we see the financial investment return column below so all of this I think balanced out to I think it was concerning 4 and also a half percent gross returns I can go'back and also double check that in a 2nd yet you see it ' s it ' s never ever 4 4 4 four four 4 4 4 or 6 six 6 six this is what it looks like in the actual globe so James retires essentially the start of 2023 we have the Deferred income annuity clicking on right here we ' ve altered Social Protection to click on below so if we include these two with each other come hell or high water there'will certainly'be minimally 74 000 nearly 75 000 transferred into his bank account every solitary year currently if we look at the retirement require it ' s about sixty one thousand bucks plus the discretionary Go-Go investing is concerning twelve thousand two ninety nine so about seventy three thousand dollars yet what this does is due to the fact that we ' re getting so a lot from these 2 sources it really minimizes the need for the profile to do and if we kind of go out go on out via retired life you see Social Security isn ' t boosting revenue so later on in life currently we ' re up to regarding 89 practically 90 000 of earnings as well as our ninety thousand dollars inflation adjusted retirement revenue requirement is covered by the amount of assured life time revenue that we have in the profile which then allows our profile equilibriums to support because we ' re not needing it to sustain our way of life later on in life so this is just one instance right here however we see the ending profile worth also though it spends down a little bit in the beginning years fine it begins to support since the revenue provided from the choices that we ' ve made placed us in a situation where we put on ' t have to take out so a lot from the profile Okay so now I want to look at a different test as well as simply to validate below the 500th situation was a standard of 4.6 but you saw the various order of those returns and exactly how we really obtained to 4.6 all right so if we move this up here allow ' s think it ' s a rather negative scenario this is going to let me alter it here find a worse return all right so this brings the average down to 3.05 and also we still see in bar chart kind below that the portfolio value still is stabilized and it ' s mainly because that adjustment in the Social Safety decision as well as adding the Deferred earnings annuity it still places us into that position to where if the market doesn ' t execute we have sufficient revenue from assured sources'that we ' re not reliant on the stock market to offer us income in retirement specifically later on in life when we generally are much more conventional as well as a lot of individuals that I ' ve worked with put on ' t have the same stomach at 80 or 82 to remain spent in Big Market pullbacks as they did when they were 52 or 62.

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Step 4 of Retirement Success Plan: Health Care Planning

in between medical insurance costs medicare costs and also out-of-pocket expenses like prescriptions co-pays and deductibles you'' re expected to invest well over two hundred thousand bucks on Health Care over the training course of your retired life which doesn'' t include the capacity for long-lasting treatment costs later in life this is why Health and wellness Care preparation is tip 4 of the retirement success plan foreign step one the allotment this is exactly how we spread your Dollars around numerous Investments according to your determination to take threat and your capability to take risk to create revenue which then income preparation is tip two tax preparation is step three and also Health Care preparing right here at step four needs to be done in this series since truly what wellness treatment preparation is if you retire prior to 65 it'' s actually income and also tax preparation and the result of that is what you ' ll pay in wellness care costs so I want to go with several of the devices that we use that you can use in your home however additionally begin to consider the bigger photo as well as just how these different choices influence your overall retired life prepare the very first step in this procedure is to truly determine what selections we have and after that comprehending the influence that those choices can make so several of you will certainly have extra options than others as an example if you have every one of your cash inside your pension anytime you take cash out of that account you need to pay tax on it that raises what'' s called your changed adjusted gross income which then determines whether you get approved for an exceptional tax credit scores approve aid for a health and wellness treatment strategy or if you do not so if we conserve cash today by managing where we take distributions from in retirement how does that impact United States in 5 years in one decade in 20 years as soon as we have that clear image of exactly how these decisions can impact you today as well as into the future we can really begin to discuss the benefits as well as factors to consider for going down each course a number of you around you have a great deal of money inside your 401k or an IRA whenever we take cash out once again those distributions are subject to earnings tax there'' s nothing we can do regarding that here we have a longer term contrast of dealing with the tax obligation infestation in your retirement account by doing Roth conversions at a critical Speed over an established variety of years currently the strategy always transforms since account worths transform the tax obligation regulations can change yet from a high degree sight we see we could potentially pay 269 000 in tax obligations if we address this challenge versus over here if we adhere to the conventional wisdom path we'' re looking at regarding 7 150 Grand in taxes so this is a significant lasting obstacle the inquiry currently ends up being do we address this first or do we attempt to purposefully take money from perhaps your non-qualified which is cash that'' s beyond your pension in mix with pension withdrawals or we delay the retired life account merely pull from Bank financial savings or other possessions that aren'' t inside a retired life account do we turn Social Security on what influence does that carry the tax computation this is the ordinary healthcare costs for a pair retiring in this nation prior to age 65.

So it'' s regarding twenty four thousand 9 hundred and seventy one for a person that'' s retiring this is a couple concerning two thousand dollars a month before Medicare to make sure that'' s twenty four thousand bucks a year that ' s cash today that if we do tactically prepare for for reducing those expenses now we do have to defer the pension planning so the question becomes do we intend to save money today or is it more crucial to deal with the longer term obstacle so that 24 000 and that'' s the average price for medical insurance costs and also out-of-pocket prices now your situation might be a bit different but we sit with hundreds of individuals and when they retire before 65 that'' s a pretty excellent quote of what you ' re mosting likely to be confronted with when it involves cash outlays for Healthcare coverage prior to Medicare from a preparation viewpoint there are means that we can maintain those health insurance policy costs down we have to be very mindful of what'' s called our modified adjusted gross earnings so this is a really vital number in the tax code and also in retirement planning in basic it influences various elements of of the code but additionally it'' s computed in different ways for numerous facets of the code as an example when we'' re checking out any kind of Medicare costs increases the estimation for changed adjusted gross earnings is different than the estimation for superior tax obligation debts for decreasing your wellness insurance prices same exact same word customized adjusted gross income but it'' s calculated 2 various methods so we need to recognize several of these subtleties we'' re mosting likely to undergo these yet right here is just a calculator that we can utilize it'' s from the Kaiser Foundation there ' s a whole bunch of these online but I just desire to go through how it functions so you can enter your state right here we'' re just taking a look at the U.S average your household income so thirty 5 thousand bucks is insurance coverage offered no for your from your spouse'' s task this is health coverage number of individuals in your family members variety of grownups 21 to 64.

any kids no so the variety of the earnings number there that is the changed adjusted gross income we'' re going to obtain into in just a min just how you determine that yet we see right here we can certify if this was our circumstance the average advantage is two thousand and also three bucks each month so that'' s 24 000 a year in a tax obligation credit report that will certainly buck for buck reduce your medical insurance premiums now at the end of the year due to the fact that you have to inform the federal government what we expect our earnings remaining in advance if it ends up being various than what we'' ve informed them we may get a costs at the end of the year yet also we make it a refund if it'' s actually much less and and our aid can potentially be a lot more so just want to present you to this tool there are a number of other tools available but in order to effectively utilize this device you need to know just how to determine your modified adjusted gross revenue so this is straight from healthcare.gov it'' s important to keep in mind though that not every state joins the federal exchange we simply lately had a client we were collaborating with in New York and despite the fact that it'' s imitated the Affordable Care Act legislation the regulations are a bit various a minimum of we were told that of exactly how tweaked adjusted gross revenue is calculated it especially involves which deductions you can take to lower your modified adjusted gross earnings number down so if your state does take part in the government exchange you can most likely to healthcare.gov I'' m going to reveal you where to look as well as what to search for if your state does not participate you'' re mosting likely to need to contact them straight there should be a website and a number for some sort of hotline for help to aid figure this out you can just Google healthcare.gov m-a-g-i computation that need to obtain you here so Social Protection it'' s essential to comprehend this since a great deal of times people intend to take Social Safety early as soon as they retire yet you need to comprehend that it increases your customized adjusted gross earnings for this estimation and afterwards that can result in you paying extra in wellness insurance coverage sets you back so net you'' re not actually getting any fringe benefit by transforming Social Safety on or a minimized benefit Social Safety and security is either 100 free of tax 50 tax obligation free or 15 percent tax obligation cost-free to relying on you guessed it changed it just a gross earnings but think what it'' s likewise a various calculation than what we ' ve spoke about previously so just recognize turning your social safety and security benefit on can influence your certification for a medical care aid if you'' re retiring prior to 65. Any kind of earnings so if a spouse is still working any type of self-employment earnings and also any kind of joblessness compensation Social Safety these are every one of the revenues that enter into determining your total customized adjusted gross revenue when you'' ve determined your revenue an approximated basis for the approaching year we now have to take right into consideration any type of reduction so just listed below this chart I simply revealed you it says can I take reductions for my income if we click that this page shows up we can subtract these expenses we can not subtract these expenses so overall earnings minus certain reductions is going to equal your changed adjusted gross earnings for the function of doing this estimation this estimation once again is not the very same for all aspects of the tax code that depend on Magi to identify if you certify or do except other various other parts other benefits spousal support if your separation was wrapped up prior to January 1st 2019. educator costs if you'' re an educator as well as you pay out of pocket student funding rate of interest as well as any health interest-bearing account payment so you do not need to be functioning to make a wellness savings account payment that money can go in there on a tax obligation insurance deductible basis it grows tax deferred as well as if you take cash out for certified health care expenditures it'' s 100 tax-free every little thing so the HSA is one of the most incredible accounts out there if you'' re not making use of it something you ought to absolutely check into philanthropic contributions reliant or childcare costs clinical costs home mortgage interest a great deal of real estate tax state revenue tax obligations tuition sets you back a great deal of the expenditures that you usually would get to deduct to calculate your tax obligation responsibility you do not obtain to subtract when computing your customized adjusted gross earnings level fine currently you have a good understanding of exactly how this estimation is made to assist establish whether you qualify for an aid or not because again keep maintain let'' s keep concentrated below we'' re trying to reduce the out-of-pocket price that you spend for your health insurance coverage premiums however we do have to evaluate this choice versus the longer term tax obligation obstacles that we have inside the retirement so one of the tools that we use right here is the tax planning software that enables us as soon as we get as soon as we'' ve got this information from you we can begin to place it in right here and after that begin to have fun with a few of the numbers so let'' s claim we have a dividend portfolio that tip one the allotment visit we'' ve chose we wanted a dividend profile IRA circulations so allow'' s state we were considering doing a forty thousand buck Roth conversion right here now you'' ve come in as well as'you ' ve taken Social Protection so you just retired as well as the gross Social Security in between 2 spouses is forty 6 thousand bucks so currently we boil down below first the software application is truly cool this is mosting likely to show us other chances as an example if one spouse is still working we might make a Roth individual retirement account contribution since we'' re under the limits a few other things right here individual retirement account contribution this is very essential since this is just one of the devices we can make use of to aid reduce your customized adjuster gross earnings to get a higher aid but really this is what I'' m searching for so customized adjusted gross earnings for ACA premium tax credit report alright can be found in at a hundred and also 9 thousand bucks so currently if we go back to the Kaiser Structure site we take this mhei get in 109 000.

boil down right here send okay so we still get approved for one thousand 2 hundred as well as seventy 9 bucks or fifteen thousand 3 forty seven annually so we can still perhaps do the Roth conversion we can have that dividend as well as interest and still certify for some kind of aid right here now we'' re checking out this is based off a silver strategy one of the most you need to pay is eight and also a half percent according to the law without financial help your plan would certainly have cost concerning 2 thousand dollars a month so you have various other information down below regarding bronze strategies gold prepares so this is something where you'' re mosting likely to need to locate a specialist that collaborates with these different wellness insurance plans yet actually you have to learn see to it that these plans are going to cover whatever requires that you may have there are specific restrictions that establish the optimum out of pocket costs this is not our location of expertise the health and wellness insurance Marketplace so you certainly intend to locate someone that can help you browse the selections that you have and see to it they fit you and your medical requirements at this phase of life however strictly from a financial perspective we see just how we'' re beginning to currently do planning where we'' re incorporating the various choices that you have to make where you take earnings from do you turn Social Safety and security on are we doing Roth conversions and also looking at this analysis to determine what your Magi is and currently an additional tool where we can go in as well as plug it in and also seek to see if we certify for a subsidy so allow'' s consider if we didn ' t do the Roth conversion so let'' s state even if we began Social Protection if it'' s been just a couple of months you do have the alternative of either putting on hold Social Safety or paying it back so we can in fact reverse this decision we have a pair of ways of doing that so let'' s state we look at every little thing as well as because social safety and security has a surefire boost to it each year that we delay it allow'' s state we decide you know what I such as that principle Troy I don'' t want to take Social Protection currently we begin to examine no social safety revenue therefore you understand what I have these cost savings where I put on'' t really require to pull earnings out and let ' s look at possibly refraining a Roth conversion simply to kind of see what that is still mosting likely to have the rewards since we have money spent and we put on'' t want to allow the the tax tail necessarily Wag the Pet dog meaning we require to generate income we have an investment strategy so we'' re simply gathering info so we come down right here as well as we see now our changed insurance adjuster gross earnings is twenty 3 thousand so we can go back and forth we can say what is the boost to the costs if we do a 60 or 70 or 80 000 conversion in any case we can check out that come back to the calculator it need to be quite comparable to what it remained in the start however just to show you twenty 3 thousand whatever else is the same we struck send 2051 back to twenty four thousand bucks a year so possibly we can do an additional Roth conversion so there'' s no real exact right solution below you can start to see now how it'' s kind of great since we still have this tax problem long term to where if we put on'' t address this and also especially right currently where we have a much larger chance to fill up these tax obligation buckets up due to the Trump tax obligation cuts which are vanishing in 2026 so it'' s an equilibrium right we have to make a few of these decisions however I just intended to kind of show you why step 4 of the retired life success plan is so vital is because these choices can assist place even more cash in your pocket today and also when we start to look at these choices I'' m constantly a large proponent of keeping even more cash in the pocket today since rmds put on'' t beginning on that particular retired life account till you'' re 73 potentially 75 depending on your age we have even more time to deal with that issue where this is an assurance where if we do these points let'' s claim take no cash out of the individual retirement account do not transform Social Safety and security on live off the non-qualified or non-ira counts if we can place two thousand bucks added monthly in your pocket today it'' s an assured win I like that I'' m aboard with it the 2nd component of medical care planning is the long-lasting treatment side of points a lot of of you have taken treatment of a moms and dad or you recognize a person that has or perhaps you'' re experiencing that now and you understand not just the monetary problem that that can develop yet likewise the emotional and time concern so we have to decide do we intend to self-insure do we want to acquire what'' s called a standard long-lasting care insurance plan or do we wish to take a look at some more long-term choices so when we'' ve done those initial 3 actions we can start to extrapolate out right into the future do a level of sensitivity analysis to see okay ideal instance situation most likely or or mean scenario and afterwards worst situation situation and see roughly just how much money that we are anticipated to have less so below we have the Genworth expense of treatment calculator so you can Google this it'' s simply generous price of care calculator enter your ZIP code take a look at the hourly day-to-day monthly prices we have a little slider where we can check into the future to see what the projected costs are these are based on median expense so not the most you can pay not the least yet right there you understand between in Houston presently for for residence health and wellness treatment forty five hundred a month is the average I moved this out 25 years it'' s estimated to be 9 500 each month now we have customers right currently that are investing twenty thousand dollars a month to deal with their parents for house healthcare most of you recognize the individual tale that I completed my grandparents this was practically twenty years ago I was ideal out of college I took three years to look after them due to the fact that my grandfather had two aortic aneurysms and also in country North Carolina they were being charged 40 000 monthly 2 registered nurses 12 hr changes 24 hr a day 40 Grand each month so these prices are throughout the board yet this is an useful calculator to type of allow you know what the mean remains in your particular location but please understand you might likewise invest a lot even more currently some people will need look after thirty days some people will certainly need look after a long time if it'' s something like Alzheimer'' s or dementia so you have to consider your individual situations however what I'' m attempting to access is we'' re just trying to make use of data to assist understand just how much we can possibly need to pay in the future if this sort of care is important to us because then we can work that right into the economic strategy once we'' ve gathered a few of this info and involved just how essential to intend for long-term care it is to you or your partner we can start to make use of the financial planning software application to truly check out what are a few of things that we'' re terrified of as well as among them for numerous clients is healthcare as well as lasting care prices so let'' s say one partner at age 80 needs treatment lasting for 3 years and it'' s ninety 2 thousand bucks a year as well as state the second partner after that requires treatment for two years beginning at 92.

however it'' s not substantial care but still inflation So based upon all the planning that we'' ve done earlier having this kind of treatment scenario for both spouses reduces a plan from a 99 probability of success to an 89 so in the conversation is are you comfy keeping that now for some plans it'' s mosting likely to reduce it a whole lot much more if we'' re actually checking out your personal circumstances the possible cost in your location so lasting care is the second step when it concerns Wellness Treatment planning the very first step for most of you when you'' re retiring we ' re going to knock that out in the first couple of months of you being a customer because it involves the earnings and also the overall tax prepare for the long-lasting treatment side of points normally we'' re going to have this conversation within the first one year unless you tell us that this is a priority and also we want to relocate it up in the timeline so in summary the initial part of medical care preparation is if you'' re retiring before 65 we have to establish where your income is going to come from because where we take income and also just how the money is spent establishes exactly how much tax you pay it additionally establishes what'' s called your modified adjusted gross earnings that Magi number figure out if you receive an aid to help reduce your medical insurance costs so the initial part is figuring all that out putting the items of the problem together the 2nd component is longer term Healthcare preparing lasting treatment so for several of you this might be very very beneficial details for others perhaps you make too much cash or you'' re past the age of 65 you put on'' t need to fret about the very first component in any case everyone'' s financial strategy is personalized as well as these are points that you need to be considering whenever you'' re structure your monetary prepare for retirement [ Music] thanks

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