Style Switcher

Predefined Colors

Step 1 of Retirement Success Plan: Investment and Portfolio Analysis

I'm giving you a choice of two Investments investment a and investment B both of them return 10 over the previous year which one would you rather have been invested [Music] oftentimes when I ask this question to a prospective client I'll get the response Troy it doesn't matter they both return 10 Give Me A or B but when it comes to retirement planning and this is why step one of the rrsp is so important the allocation meeting it's not about the return necessarily it's about how much risk did we have to take to get that return investment A and B both had a 10 percent return but this is just one outcome in an infinite set of possible outcomes remember these are two distinct Investments with different characteristics possibly different purposes so even though they return the same the question is how much risk did we take to earn this return are we being compensated enough from a reward standpoint based on the risk that we're taking so with a high degree of statistical confidence we could analyze and say investment a had a likely downside scenario of somewhere between five to fifteen percent if a different set of outcomes or circumstances occurred that's the risk profile but invest B had a possible downside of negative 20 to negative 40 percent now with that new bit of information which investment would you choose investment a or investment B all individual Investments or combination of Investments could be plotted somewhere along this chart this is what we call the efficient Frontier over here we have the return the expected return and over here we have the risk that we're taking so ideally we have Investments that are more to the left which represents lower risk and higher up the y-axis which represents higher return so if you own five different stocks that portfolio in and of itself could be plotted somewhere on this graph if you have one security let's say you're fully invested in your company stock you could plot it right here on this graph now if you have 20 or 30 or 50 different mutual funds or ETFs or individual stocks once again that set of Investments can be plotted somewhere on this graph so when we plot investment a and investment B on the graph here we can clearly see that they have a similar return profile but investment a has less risk so this makes it easier to identify as an investment that we would rather place our dollars now down here I have investment C could be a portfolio of stocks this could be maybe if you have a lot of money invested in your company stock but we clearly see that we're taking more risk without being rewarded for that risk that we're taking another way to think about this is think of your skills and the capability that you have in your current job or in your former job if you're if you're retired would you take a salary that was much much lower than Market in order to do that same job with those same responsibilities no you probably would not I know you would not that's what we're doing here with investment C essentially we are taking risk or taking on responsibilities in that example while not being compensated for it okay so think of these letters investment a investment being investment C this was the one we wanted to be in this is the one that we took a little bit more risk for the same return and over here we just don't want to be in I want to liken this to GPA grade point average because we're all pretty familiar with that either you from your schooling experience you have kids or grandkids an a investment or set of Investments kind of I put a in air quotes here that's the GPA so what we want to do with your portfolio in retirement is increase its GPA we want to reduce risk and increase expected return now that you have a good understanding of risk and return and how every set of Investments can be placed somewhere on that graph it's now important to tie that into retirement planning so the allocation determines how much income you can take how much money will be left later in life it determines how much tax you'll pay in retirement it can also impact your health care strategy or long-term care strategy and it definitely impacts your overall estate plan so those are the five steps of the RSP and this is why the allocation is so critical it's step one because it impacts everything else when you reach out to us for the first time all we do on that first visit is get to understand who you are and what's important to you we're going to gather some of the objective data under of course understand what your vision is for retirement your goals but the objective data is the current portfolio the financial statements the tax information how much we want to spend in retirement in between that first and the second visit we're going to go through an analysis to see where your portfolio falls on that Spectrum in order to understand if there's congruence between your willingness to take risk for the expected return that your portfolio can provide and where you currently are we first have to identify what is that willingness that you have to take on risk so we have to first understand your willingness to take risk so this is a pretty simple questionnaire here simply saying over the next six months you're comfortable risking this in order to make this potential return now this is what we call a symmetrical risk return profile we're essentially risking one dollar to earn one dollar but really what we're trying to identify here is what is your comfort zone on the downside because what we're going to try to do is create a portfolio that has an asymmetrical risk return profile so less risk to achieve more potential return so are you comfortable losing seven percent over the next six months in a recession or are you fine to let it stay invested and you believe long-term capital markets are going to do just fine so you're more comfortable in the short term possibly a 13 loss there's no right or wrong answer here but everyone's personal willingness to take risk is different so we have to identify that because if you have a portfolio that has too much risk that is the one thing that will absolutely be certain to blow up a long-term retirement plan if the market goes down you call us up panicking and say Troy I need to get out of the market I can't take it anymore well you most likely won't be in there for the rebound and all the planning that we've done up to that point can be significantly impacted because we were expecting the risk profile based on the conversations that we had to be structured properly and if it's not and the markets go down then we get out well all of a sudden everything is completely messed up so this is why your risk willingness is such an important concept because if we're putting a plan together we need to know that you're going to stick with it because markets will go down one other thing to point out here I like to focus on the dollar amount because percentages can be deceiving I had a client a long time ago or a prospective client come in and say Troy I'm comfortable losing about 10 percent he had two million dollars so I said okay if the market goes down and you lose 200 000 you're okay with that he said no I fire you instantly so there was a disconnect between the 10 percent and the two hundred thousand dollars so I like to talk about risk in terms of dollars because percentages seem just they don't really drill down into our willingness to take risk whereas if we focus on the dollar amount that hits home okay so this would be coming back on a second visit and we're looking at your actual portfolio and this is very similar to what we see someone maybe told us that they're they're comfortable let's say with about 50 stock but when we do the analysis what we often find is that there's more risk inside the portfolio but on top of there being more risk oftentimes it's not the most efficiently structured so we see down here we actually have bringing the GPA back a 3.1 so this means that it's not the most efficient from a risk-adjusted return standpoint means we're we're not where we want to be on that graph an annual range 3.42 so for taking this much risk we don't want to be rewarded with an annual range midpoint here of only 3.42 percent over the next six months now we also see with the potential risk and reward over the next six months there's a 95 percent probability that this portfolio to the downside could lose 16 percent over a six-month period and the upside is plus 19 so these are very very wide guard rails okay if we extrapolate that out over the course of one year we have a negative 32 percent and a plus 38 so most of our clients aren't comfortable losing potentially 38 percent in a single year so for this level of risk based on the questionnaire that we asked earlier and they come in around a 50 risk score this is not only too much risk inside the portfolio but it's really poorly constructed from an analytical standpoint and the guardrails are far too wide we're not being compensated for the risk that we're taking and that's what this GPA right here is telling us that's the analysis that we go through between the first and the second visit and that's often what we see it's not efficiently structured the portfolio possibly too much risk and oftentimes that GPA is a lower number meaning we're not being compensated with enough expected return for the risk that we're taking so in between that first and the second visit that's what our team is doing looking at your particular situation now once you become a client and we go through that allocation visit this is step one of the RSP what we're trying to do is to create a proposed portfolio that brings first and foremost the risk number in line with that questionnaire that we asked you before we're also trying to create some asymmetry in regards to the risk that we're taking in the expected Return of the set of Investments that we've put together so now what we've done is we've lowered the overall risk score of the portfolio to be more in line with the questions that we were asking in regards to that that slider that we had on the screen if you're not comfortable with potentially losing 19 percent in a six-month period we need to bring the risk score down in the portfolio so that's the first thing that we're trying to do the second thing is we're trying to create asymmetry here so you see this we're risking nine for the potential of 15.

This is over a six month period so we extrapolate that out over 12 months it's minus 18 for plus 30. that's asymmetry when it comes to the risk return profile additionally we've increased the GPA of the portfolio so the maximum according to the software is a 4.3 so this means we're being properly compensated for the risk that we're taking the expected return is the proper compensation for that risk now anything can happen Marcus can go up or down but what we've done is we've created an efficient portfolio that when markets are up or when markets are down our potential returns are in line with our willingness to take risks but also when we've tied this into your income plan tax plan and the rest of the RSP it's all creating a much more congruent financial planning experience also the expense ratio over here I don't know if you noticed before but we had an expense ratio in the mutual funds and that current portfolio in the proposed portfolio we've eliminated those fees so in summary here during the first visit we get to know where your willingness to take risk is in between the first and the second visit we're going through and doing an analysis of your current portfolio identifying the risk score see if there's any disconnect between your willingness to take risk in the actual risk inside your portfolio but then also looking at the potential return what is the GPA what is the expected return what is the Symmetry between these two once you become a client and we go through the allocation meeting here's where we look at the proposed portfolio where we get the risk number of the portfolio in a line with an alignment with your willingness to take risks try to increase the asymmetry between the risk and the potential return increase the GPA of the portfolio and increase the expected return now all of this is a shortened version of what the actual allocation visit looks like but it hopefully conveys how important this step is because it not only determines the amount of risk or the potential downside you could see to your values in retirement it also of course contributes to the potential return which then dominoes into your income for retirement the taxes the health care plan and also the estate strategy so step one allocation extremely critical when it comes to the retirement success plan this is why we do it first [Music] thank you

As found on YouTube

Retirement Planning Home

Read More

Is Retirement Even POSSIBLE?

We want to thank Google's Science Journal App for supporting PBS Digital Studios. Imagine you had a time machine and with the
press of a button you could transport yourself to your own 75th birthday. Assuming you’re still around, what do you
hope to find yourself doing? Writing your memoirs? Sailing around the world? Partying in San Junipero? Very few of us would answer “cleaning toilets
at a fast-food joint,” or “begging for change on the street.” No one wants their story to end that way,
yet shockingly few of us are taking the basic steps to avoid it. The
simple fact is that if we’re lucky to live long enough, one day we will lose our desire
(or physical ability) to keep earning a paycheck. The older we get, the harder it becomes to
maintain a rigid work schedule. And as modern medicine allows us to live longer
and longer, the time we expect to spend in retirement might easily pass 30 years. Think of that for a second. 30 years without income. Nervous yet? Good. So how much would you need to not spend those
years in abject poverty.

Well, that depends on your personal needs,
standard of living, health issues, etc., but as a starting point, the AARP recommends that
to replace a $40,000 per year income for 30 years, you’ll need to start your retirement
with–take a deep breath–$1.18 million. If that number makes you feel a little dizzy…
well, you’re not alone. In one survey, Americans between 55 and 64
reported a median retirement savings of $120,000–only 10% of the amount advised by the AARP! Another survey found that 75% of Americans
over 40 are behind saving for retirement and 28% over 55 have no retirement savings at
all! There are many factors that contributed to
this problem. For one thing, wage growth declined in the
70s and 80s. It picked back up in the 90s, but then the
housing boom convinced a lot of Americans to go into debt to buy overpriced homes, and,
well, we know how that turned out. We’ve also seen an increase in cultural
pressure to show “visual displays of wealth.” A study published in the Quarterly Journal
of Economics suggests that Americans are uniquely concerned about seeming poor to others, so
they spend a disproportionate amount on things like shoes, clothes and cars.

It’s been great business for designer labels
and advertisers–not so much for our savings accounts. Lastly, changes in government policies have
made it easier to not save money. In the past, employees were automatically
enrolled in “defined benefit plans” with pre-set funding amounts to match their retirement
needs. Today’s workers have to “opt in” to
retirement plans like 401(k)s, and figure out for themselves how much to set aside. Furthermore, these plans are often “leaky,”
meaning you’re allowed to remove funds prematurely, which makes it easy to steal from your own
retirement. Does all this mean that saving for retirement
is hopeless and you should just blow your extra dough leasing a sports car? No! It’s still very possible to save up large
amounts of money on a modest income. The three special ingredients are Good Markets,
Compound Interest, and Time. To show you how these elements work together,
it’s time to… RUN THE NUMBERS! Betty is 30 years old and makes $50,000/yr.

She hasn’t saved a dime for retirement yet,
but this year she’s decided to start. Between the amount she is going to save into
her Roth IRA, her 401(k) at work, and her 401(k) match, she’s putting away $625 a
month, or $7,500 a year, That’s 15% of her income–which many experts recommend as a
good savings target. At this rate, by the time she’s 65, Betty
will have personally deposited $262,500 into her retirement account. Impressive, but still a long way from the
million dollars plus she’ll need to retire. But now we add our special ingredients! Over the last 90 years, the stock market has
grown an average of 9.8% per year. But let’s assume a little less than that…
say, 7.5% If Betty can put together a decent portfolio, she can expect her savings to grow
by an average of 7.5% per year. And as long as Betty doesn’t touch that
account, the dividends and interest she earns will generate even more dividends and interest! And over time, her savings doesn’t just
increase in a straight line… it increases exponentially! Now, by the time she’s 65, that $262,500
of her original money has ballooned to $1,277,158.92.

Nice job Betty! A couple things to keep in mind with this
scenario. It’s very likely that goods and services
will cost more in the future due to inflation. However, it’s also very likely that a 30
year old like Betty will see her salary increase as she gains more experience and skill. If she sticks to that same 15% of her salary,
she can expect to have even more set aside for retirement. What if you’re older than Betty and getting
a late start? Well, that may mean that you need to set aside
more of your paycheck, say 20 or 25 percent.

Or you may have to wait until your 70s to
retire. Either of these options is better than doing
nothing or counting on winning the lottery. There are many other factors that can change
your specific situation. Inheritances, social security, pensions, medical
conditions. If you’re not sure where to begin, you can
seek out the help of a financial planner who is a sworn fiduciary. They can outline a plan that fits your needs
and show you that preparing for retirement is not as intimidating as you may think. You don’t have to be into shuffleboard or
bird-watching to expect a little time off in your golden years. And some people want to work as long as they
can. But everyone wants the power to decide that
for themselves, especially after a lifetime of hard work. Of course, if you do manage to get access
to a time machine, you can always fall back on the old “Sports Almanac Retirement Plan.” And that’s our two cents! Thanks to Google for supporting PBS Digital Studios.

Their mobile app, Science Journal lets you take notes and measure scientific phenomena such as light, sound, and motion, using your phone, tablet or Chromebook. You can find activity ideas and additional information on their website at g.co/sciencejournal.

As found on YouTube

Retirement Planning Home

Read More

Retirement Planning for Singles

Retirement is a big deal for anybody, and that's especially true for single people who may be retiring with just one income and who may have built up a nest egg solely off their own savings. So, we know that single people can and do retire comfortably. In fact, one quarter of people over age 60 are living alone in their household, and that number is slightly higher for women, and that's, of course, due to women's longevity. So what we're going to talk about here is retirement for single people. First, we'll go over some averages to give you a rough idea of what the landscape looks like for single people, then we'll get into how much money you might need as you go into retirement, then we'll talk about some tips that can help improve the chances of retiring comfortably.

Let's start with the average retirement income for single people. So it's $42,000 on average for an individual in retirement, and that comes from the US Census Bureau. The median is a little bit lower at $27,000. So a friendly reminder of how this works: The median is the middle, so if you line up all of the survey results, people telling you what their income is, for example, that arrow points at the middle observation, which would give us the median down at the bottom. But if we go to the average, that is going to get skewed by, in this case, wealthy people, for example, they have a very high income. When it comes to Social Security, the average is about $1,500 a month or $18,000 per year.Your level depends, of course on your earnings, if you had higher earnings during your working years, then you tend to potentially have a bigger benefit than that, and it could be lower, and then of course, your claiming age is also an important thing.

If you claim early at age 62, you get a reduced benefit. That's likely to bring down the amount you get. Next, we have pensions, some people get an income from a job they worked at. That might be in the public sector as a teacher, a firefighter, that sort of thing, or even in the private sector, you could have a pension from your job, and those incomes just are all over the board, it could be high, it could be low, but these are different sources of income that people might have in retirement.

This is just a friendly reminder that this is just one video and it may cover some interesting information, but it's not specific to you so I hope you'll do a lot more research, hopefully check with some professionals and get some individualized advice, and that way you can improve the chances of things going well for you. So now let's talk about how much you might need as you go into retirement. Unfortunately, there's no single answer on what you need because it depends. So the first step is to figure out what sort of income you're going to need, and I've got other videos on that, I'll put links in the description to get you some more information, but you can look at replacing a portion of your income, or you can just say, I want X amount of dollars per year, or you can go with other approaches, but first we need to know how much income you are hoping for. Next, we tally up your income sources, so that might be some guaranteed income that comes in from Social Security, for example, or from your pension at your workplace, but that forms a base of income and that might or might not cover what you need.

But it gives us a base and then if we need to fill that in, we can supplement withdrawals from your retirement savings, so that might be out of your IRA, your 401, 403, these accounts that you have built up over time can provide supplemental income to help fill the gap between that guaranteed income you get and the amount you actually want to spend. There are a number of ways to figure out how much to withdraw and to set up different strategies, there might be bucking strategies, there might be withdrawal strategies like the 4% rule. Or if you don't like that, make it the 3% rule to be safer, or take out more if you think that's not enough and you're selling yourself short. Ultimately, there are a number of ways to approach this, so you just pick one that works well for you, and again, I can point you to some resources on figuring that out. And finally, you will want to look at taxes and inflation, so during your retirement years, it's reasonable to assume that prices may increase on many of the things you buy, so we want your income to be able to increase as well, Social Security typically does rise, but maybe not at the same rate as the things you're buying, so your withdrawals may need to account for that.

Plus we've got taxes. You typically will owe taxes if you're taking distributions or you're taking withdrawals from pre tax retirement accounts. If you have a pension that might be taxable as well. We just want to look at all of these things and figure out what your ultimate money left over to spend each month is going to be. For an over simplified example, let's just look at Jane Doe. She's 60 years old, she's single, she wants to retire in about five years, she makes about 80,000 a year and has 700,000. A lot of people retire with less than that, a lot of people retire with more. I'm going to bring up my financial planning software that I use with clients, and we'll just go over kind of why there's no single answer on how much you need. Now, if you can tell me exactly how long you'll live and what the markets will do and what inflation will look like, we can tell you exactly what you'll need.

But there are a lot of unknowns, so a lot of times we start with a probability of success and I'll go over what that means, and then we look at little tweaks and how different changes might affect that probability of success, so working an extra year might bring her from… Let's say 75% to 84% likely to succeed. Now, success and failure are pretty complicated. They don't necessarily mean that you go completely broke, but you may need to make some adjustments, so let's talk about what does the success mean? We, again, cannot predict the future, so we say, Let's look back and say, You get dealt 1,000 hands.

You're playing a game of cards and you get 1,000 hands. Some of those are good and some of those are bad, so the very good ones tend to be up here, near the top. And you actually end up with a lot of money left over. Some of them are not as good and you end up running out of money early. The median is, again, that one that's right in the middle when we line them up in order for best to worst. And so you might say, you're probably not going to get the best, you're probably not going to get the worst, although anything is possible. So that's how we go with this likelihood of success. Now, maybe she doesn't want to work an extra year, so we can look at different ways of accomplishing things here. By the way, we've built in some long term care in case she does get sick and needs that at the end of life.

She's looking to spend about 4,000 a month, that's after some health care costs that are going to inflate each year, and she's saving a decent amount in some 401K and taxable accounts. Let's say she goes ahead and maxes out that Roth, is it going to make a big difference? Not really, 'cause she only has five years left. So what we do here is we start looking at all of these different variables and playing with the pieces and figuring out what does it take to make her successful at her retirement, or at least successful enough that she's comfortable making that transition. So here are some tips to improve your chances. The first is to plan for long term care. If you're living on your own, you don't have somebody in the house who can help you do things, and it's arguable if even a couple is capable of managing this on their own…

I mean, if you think about a couple, is one of the people physically able to move the other person around and do they have the skills to provide health care, and the time and the energy, frankly, to provide all that type of care? So it's important for everybody, but it's especially important for single people to plan for this care. So you can look at getting insurance, you can look at budgeting for some costs, like we showed you in the software, you might want to budget for a much bigger number if you go into memory care or something like that with 24 hour supervision, it can get really expensive quickly. And you can explore different living arrangements, maybe doing things with friends or certain communities that might be a good fit for you. Next is to avoid leaving money on the table so if you were previously married and your spouse passed away or you've been divorced, you may be eligible for benefits. That's maybe from Social Security, you can potentially get a survivor's benefit, or if you were married for at least 10 years and you've been divorced, you can potentially get spousal benefits on your ex spouse's work record.

It's just important to explore all of these to see if there are any resources available for you. Next is to make a plan, and I am of course biased as a financial planner, but I think it is really helpful to go through the process, and the main goal isn't to get a big document that tells you what your financial plan is. Instead, really, the benefit is going through that process and learning a lot about your finances as you do it, and in that process, you get an idea of what the risks are, how you're doing, you might get confidence and clarity on whether or not you can go ahead and retire, if you should do certain things or not. It's just a very valuable process for a lot of people, but I'll leave that for you to decide.

If you found this video helpful, please leave a quick thumbs up. That gives me feedback that this is something you might enjoy more of, so thanks for watching and take care..

As found on YouTube

Retirement Planning Home

Read More

401K Explained in தமிழ் (US Retirement Series – 1)

This episode and next few episodes are going to be US specific episodes. All these US specific episodes will have US flag in their thumbnails. Indian audience, feel free to skip these episodes and save your time. US folks, there are 2 main retirement plans in USA. 1. 401K and 2. IRA. We will cover more in detail about IRA in another episode. In this episode, we will cover 401K in detail. Hi. My name is Vijay Mohan. You are watching – Investment Insights. 401K is a retirement plan offered thru employer.

We will not be able to open a 401K account just by ourself like a brokerage account. We can contribute to a 401K, only if it is offered through our employer. Almost all employers offer 401K plan. Very few small companies do not offer 401K. How much can we contribute to a 401K? Each employee can save up to $20,500 per year. If husband and wife both are working, both can contribute $20,500 each. People older than 50 can contribute more – $27,000/year. That is called as "Catch up contribution". Other than our contribution to 401K, many employers match up our contribution up to certain percentage. Let's say that an employer is matching up to 7%. If our salary is $100K, 7% of that would be $7,000. Let's say that we are contributing $20,500 to our 401k and maxing it out. Employer would have matched up the first $7,000 of that $20,500 and would have contributed that $7,000 to our 401K.

So in total, our contribution $20,500 + employer match up contribution $7,000 = $27,500 would have gone into our 401K account. Employer match of $7,000 would not come under the contribution limit of $20,500. This match is over that contribution limit. In this employer match, each employer has a catch called "Vesting Schedule". This vesting schedule defines when that extra amount matched up by the employer is going to actually credit in our account. Let's say that an employer has a vesting schedule of 2 years, then in that 2 years, the match up amount contributed by the employer will be in our account, but not vested. That means, if we leave the job within the 2 years of joining, then we will not get that matched up amount. But after 2 years, that matched up amount will be ours totally, even if we leave the job. Also, after that vesting period of 2 years, all money matched up by the employer will be vested (available) to us immediately. That means, there will not be any restriction over the matched up money after passing 2 years.

The 2 years I am referring here is just an example. It will be different for every employer. So what is the advantage to us from this 401K? The advantage is, we do not have to pay the tax on the amount we are contributing to 401K. But we should pay tax on withdrawal after retirement. What? No tax for the contributed money, but taxed on withdrawal? What benefit does that offer to us? Good question. To understand that, we should know about our tax bracket.

What we are seeing here is 2022 Married Filing Jointly tax bracket. Let's say that our family income is $120,000. We will come under 22% tax bracket. That does not mean that we will be paying 22% tax for the whole $120,000 we earned. First 20,000 of $120,000 will be taxed at 10%. Next 63,000 will be taxed at 12%. Money earned over that will be taxed at 22% tax. So the 22% tax is charged for the top most dollar we made in that year. This is called as Marginal Tax rate. If we add up all the taxes for individual brackets of 10%, 12% and 22%, that comes out to $17,634. This is 14.7% of our total income $120,000. So actually we are paying only 14.7% of our income as tax. This 14.7% is called "Effective Tax Rate". May confuse between marginal tax rate and effective tax rate. Hope it is clear now. So when we contribute $20,500 to our 401K, it comes out of our top most tax bracket. That means, the tax we saved from the contribution of $20,500 is 22%. $4510. If we withdraw the same $20,500 after our retirement, the tax rate for that would be 10%.

Tax saved for contribution is 22%, while money coming out is taxed at 10%. The difference is 12% in our favor. Or in other words, we save tax in marginal tax rate for contribution and we pay effective tax rate while withdrawal. We all know that effective tax rate will be always lower than the marginal tax rate. This is first advantage. Let's check out a sample calculation to understand the next advantage. Let's say that our family income is $120,000. Then federal marginal tax rate is 22%. Let's use Illinois state tax rate – 5%. For 401K contribution, not just the federal tax, we don't have to pay the state tax as well. Let's assume that our 401K will be growing at 8% growth rate.

We are maxing out our 401K contribution every year by contributing 20,500/year. Tax savings from this contribution is 27%. $5535. We are continuing to do this till our retirement for 25 years. By the end of 25 years, our 401K balance would have reached 1 million 600,000 dollars. The $5535 that we saved every year in tax alone would have grown into $437,000. The absolute tax saved is 5355 * 25 = $138,000. The growth from that savings is approximately $300,000. Or in other words, just because we did not pay (deferred) the tax of $138,000, the extra growth we got from that is $300,000. The growth of money by deferring (not paying the tax now) the taxes to pay later is called as "Tax deferred Compounding". This tax deferred compounding is 401K's second advantage. For these 2 advantages, we can contribute to 401K. We should. So far we have seen a regular pretax 401K. There are other flavors of 401K like Roth 401K and After tax 401K. We will dig deeper into that in the next episode. Thank You..

As found on YouTube

401K to Gold IRA Rollover

Read More

Step 1 of Retirement Success Plan: Investment and Portfolio Analysis

I'm giving you a choice of two Investments investment a and investment B both of them return 10 over the previous year which one would you rather have been invested [Music] oftentimes when I ask this question to a prospective client I'll get the response Troy it doesn't matter they both return 10 Give Me A or B but when it comes to retirement planning and this is why step one of the rrsp is so important the allocation meeting it's not about the return necessarily it's about how much risk did we have to take to get that return investment A and B both had a 10 percent return but this is just one outcome in an infinite set of possible outcomes remember these are two distinct Investments with different characteristics possibly different purposes so even though they return the same the question is how much risk did we take to earn this return are we being compensated enough from a reward standpoint based on the risk that we're taking so with a high degree of statistical confidence we could analyze and say investment a had a likely downside scenario of somewhere between five to fifteen percent if a different set of outcomes or circumstances occurred that's the risk profile but invest B had a possible downside of negative 20 to negative 40 percent now with that new bit of information which investment would you choose investment a or investment B all individual Investments or combination of Investments could be plotted somewhere along this chart this is what we call the efficient Frontier over here we have the return the expected return and over here we have the risk that we're taking so ideally we have Investments that are more to the left which represents lower risk and higher up the y-axis which represents higher return so if you own five different stocks that portfolio in and of itself could be plotted somewhere on this graph if you have one security let's say you're fully invested in your company stock you could plot it right here on this graph now if you have 20 or 30 or 50 different mutual funds or ETFs or individual stocks once again that set of Investments can be plotted somewhere on this graph so when we plot investment a and investment B on the graph here we can clearly see that they have a similar return profile but investment a has less risk so this makes it easier to identify as an investment that we would rather place our dollars now down here I have investment C could be a portfolio of stocks this could be maybe if you have a lot of money invested in your company stock but we clearly see that we're taking more risk without being rewarded for that risk that we're taking another way to think about this is think of your skills and the capability that you have in your current job or in your former job if you're if you're retired would you take a salary that was much much lower than Market in order to do that same job with those same responsibilities no you probably would not I know you would not that's what we're doing here with investment C essentially we are taking risk or taking on responsibilities in that example while not being compensated for it okay so think of these letters investment a investment being investment C this was the one we wanted to be in this is the one that we took a little bit more risk for the same return and over here we just don't want to be in I want to liken this to GPA grade point average because we're all pretty familiar with that either you from your schooling experience you have kids or grandkids an a investment or set of Investments kind of I put a in air quotes here that's the GPA so what we want to do with your portfolio in retirement is increase its GPA we want to reduce risk and increase expected return now that you have a good understanding of risk and return and how every set of Investments can be placed somewhere on that graph it's now important to tie that into retirement planning so the allocation determines how much income you can take how much money will be left later in life it determines how much tax you'll pay in retirement it can also impact your health care strategy or long-term care strategy and it definitely impacts your overall estate plan so those are the five steps of the RSP and this is why the allocation is so critical it's step one because it impacts everything else when you reach out to us for the first time all we do on that first visit is get to understand who you are and what's important to you we're going to gather some of the objective data under of course understand what your vision is for retirement your goals but the objective data is the current portfolio the financial statements the tax information how much we want to spend in retirement in between that first and the second visit we're going to go through an analysis to see where your portfolio falls on that Spectrum in order to understand if there's congruence between your willingness to take risk for the expected return that your portfolio can provide and where you currently are we first have to identify what is that willingness that you have to take on risk so we have to first understand your willingness to take risk so this is a pretty simple questionnaire here simply saying over the next six months you're comfortable risking this in order to make this potential return now this is what we call a symmetrical risk return profile we're essentially risking one dollar to earn one dollar but really what we're trying to identify here is what is your comfort zone on the downside because what we're going to try to do is create a portfolio that has an asymmetrical risk return profile so less risk to achieve more potential return so are you comfortable losing seven percent over the next six months in a recession or are you fine to let it stay invested and you believe long-term capital markets are going to do just fine so you're more comfortable in the short term possibly a 13 loss there's no right or wrong answer here but everyone's personal willingness to take risk is different so we have to identify that because if you have a portfolio that has too much risk that is the one thing that will absolutely be certain to blow up a long-term retirement plan if the market goes down you call us up panicking and say Troy I need to get out of the market I can't take it anymore well you most likely won't be in there for the rebound and all the planning that we've done up to that point can be significantly impacted because we were expecting the risk profile based on the conversations that we had to be structured properly and if it's not and the markets go down then we get out well all of a sudden everything is completely messed up so this is why your risk willingness is such an important concept because if we're putting a plan together we need to know that you're going to stick with it because markets will go down one other thing to point out here I like to focus on the dollar amount because percentages can be deceiving I had a client a long time ago or a prospective client come in and say Troy I'm comfortable losing about 10 percent he had two million dollars so I said okay if the market goes down and you lose 200 000 you're okay with that he said no I fire you instantly so there was a disconnect between the 10 percent and the two hundred thousand dollars so I like to talk about risk in terms of dollars because percentages seem just they don't really drill down into our willingness to take risk whereas if we focus on the dollar amount that hits home okay so this would be coming back on a second visit and we're looking at your actual portfolio and this is very similar to what we see someone maybe told us that they're they're comfortable let's say with about 50 stock but when we do the analysis what we often find is that there's more risk inside the portfolio but on top of there being more risk oftentimes it's not the most efficiently structured so we see down here we actually have bringing the GPA back a 3.1 so this means that it's not the most efficient from a risk-adjusted return standpoint means we're we're not where we want to be on that graph an annual range 3.42 so for taking this much risk we don't want to be rewarded with an annual range midpoint here of only 3.42 percent over the next six months now we also see with the potential risk and reward over the next six months there's a 95 percent probability that this portfolio to the downside could lose 16 percent over a six-month period and the upside is plus 19 so these are very very wide guard rails okay if we extrapolate that out over the course of one year we have a negative 32 percent and a plus 38 so most of our clients aren't comfortable losing potentially 38 percent in a single year so for this level of risk based on the questionnaire that we asked earlier and they come in around a 50 risk score this is not only too much risk inside the portfolio but it's really poorly constructed from an analytical standpoint and the guardrails are far too wide we're not being compensated for the risk that we're taking and that's what this GPA right here is telling us that's the analysis that we go through between the first and the second visit and that's often what we see it's not efficiently structured the portfolio possibly too much risk and oftentimes that GPA is a lower number meaning we're not being compensated with enough expected return for the risk that we're taking so in between that first and the second visit that's what our team is doing looking at your particular situation now once you become a client and we go through that allocation visit this is step one of the RSP what we're trying to do is to create a proposed portfolio that brings first and foremost the risk number in line with that questionnaire that we asked you before we're also trying to create some asymmetry in regards to the risk that we're taking in the expected Return of the set of Investments that we've put together so now what we've done is we've lowered the overall risk score of the portfolio to be more in line with the questions that we were asking in regards to that that slider that we had on the screen if you're not comfortable with potentially losing 19 percent in a six-month period we need to bring the risk score down in the portfolio so that's the first thing that we're trying to do the second thing is we're trying to create asymmetry here so you see this we're risking nine for the potential of 15.

This is over a six month period so we extrapolate that out over 12 months it's minus 18 for plus 30. that's asymmetry when it comes to the risk return profile additionally we've increased the GPA of the portfolio so the maximum according to the software is a 4.3 so this means we're being properly compensated for the risk that we're taking the expected return is the proper compensation for that risk now anything can happen Marcus can go up or down but what we've done is we've created an efficient portfolio that when markets are up or when markets are down our potential returns are in line with our willingness to take risks but also when we've tied this into your income plan tax plan and the rest of the RSP it's all creating a much more congruent financial planning experience also the expense ratio over here I don't know if you noticed before but we had an expense ratio in the mutual funds and that current portfolio in the proposed portfolio we've eliminated those fees so in summary here during the first visit we get to know where your willingness to take risk is in between the first and the second visit we're going through and doing an analysis of your current portfolio identifying the risk score see if there's any disconnect between your willingness to take risk in the actual risk inside your portfolio but then also looking at the potential return what is the GPA what is the expected return what is the Symmetry between these two once you become a client and we go through the allocation meeting here's where we look at the proposed portfolio where we get the risk number of the portfolio in a line with an alignment with your willingness to take risks try to increase the asymmetry between the risk and the potential return increase the GPA of the portfolio and increase the expected return now all of this is a shortened version of what the actual allocation visit looks like but it hopefully conveys how important this step is because it not only determines the amount of risk or the potential downside you could see to your values in retirement it also of course contributes to the potential return which then dominoes into your income for retirement the taxes the health care plan and also the estate strategy so step one allocation extremely critical when it comes to the retirement success plan this is why we do it first [Music] thank you

As found on YouTube

Retirement Planning Home

Read More

Retirement Planning for Singles

Retirement is a big deal for anybody, and that's especially true for single people who may be retiring with just one income and who may have built up a nest egg solely off their own savings. So, we know that single people can and do retire comfortably. In fact, one quarter of people over age 60 are living alone in their household, and that number is slightly higher for women, and that's, of course, due to women's longevity. So what we're going to talk about here is retirement for single people. First, we'll go over some averages to give you a rough idea of what the landscape looks like for single people, then we'll get into how much money you might need as you go into retirement, then we'll talk about some tips that can help improve the chances of retiring comfortably.

Let's start with the average retirement income for single people. So it's $42,000 on average for an individual in retirement, and that comes from the US Census Bureau. The median is a little bit lower at $27,000. So a friendly reminder of how this works: The median is the middle, so if you line up all of the survey results, people telling you what their income is, for example, that arrow points at the middle observation, which would give us the median down at the bottom.

But if we go to the average, that is going to get skewed by, in this case, wealthy people, for example, they have a very high income. When it comes to Social Security, the average is about $1,500 a month or $18,000 per year.Your level depends, of course on your earnings, if you had higher earnings during your working years, then you tend to potentially have a bigger benefit than that, and it could be lower, and then of course, your claiming age is also an important thing. If you claim early at age 62, you get a reduced benefit. That's likely to bring down the amount you get. Next, we have pensions, some people get an income from a job they worked at. That might be in the public sector as a teacher, a firefighter, that sort of thing, or even in the private sector, you could have a pension from your job, and those incomes just are all over the board, it could be high, it could be low, but these are different sources of income that people might have in retirement.

This is just a friendly reminder that this is just one video and it may cover some interesting information, but it's not specific to you so I hope you'll do a lot more research, hopefully check with some professionals and get some individualized advice, and that way you can improve the chances of things going well for you. So now let's talk about how much you might need as you go into retirement. Unfortunately, there's no single answer on what you need because it depends.

So the first step is to figure out what sort of income you're going to need, and I've got other videos on that, I'll put links in the description to get you some more information, but you can look at replacing a portion of your income, or you can just say, I want X amount of dollars per year, or you can go with other approaches, but first we need to know how much income you are hoping for. Next, we tally up your income sources, so that might be some guaranteed income that comes in from Social Security, for example, or from your pension at your workplace, but that forms a base of income and that might or might not cover what you need. But it gives us a base and then if we need to fill that in, we can supplement withdrawals from your retirement savings, so that might be out of your IRA, your 401, 403, these accounts that you have built up over time can provide supplemental income to help fill the gap between that guaranteed income you get and the amount you actually want to spend. There are a number of ways to figure out how much to withdraw and to set up different strategies, there might be bucking strategies, there might be withdrawal strategies like the 4% rule.

Or if you don't like that, make it the 3% rule to be safer, or take out more if you think that's not enough and you're selling yourself short. Ultimately, there are a number of ways to approach this, so you just pick one that works well for you, and again, I can point you to some resources on figuring that out. And finally, you will want to look at taxes and inflation, so during your retirement years, it's reasonable to assume that prices may increase on many of the things you buy, so we want your income to be able to increase as well, Social Security typically does rise, but maybe not at the same rate as the things you're buying, so your withdrawals may need to account for that. Plus we've got taxes. You typically will owe taxes if you're taking distributions or you're taking withdrawals from pre tax retirement accounts. If you have a pension that might be taxable as well. We just want to look at all of these things and figure out what your ultimate money left over to spend each month is going to be.

For an over simplified example, let's just look at Jane Doe. She's 60 years old, she's single, she wants to retire in about five years, she makes about 80,000 a year and has 700,000. A lot of people retire with less than that, a lot of people retire with more. I'm going to bring up my financial planning software that I use with clients, and we'll just go over kind of why there's no single answer on how much you need. Now, if you can tell me exactly how long you'll live and what the markets will do and what inflation will look like, we can tell you exactly what you'll need. But there are a lot of unknowns, so a lot of times we start with a probability of success and I'll go over what that means, and then we look at little tweaks and how different changes might affect that probability of success, so working an extra year might bring her from…

Let's say 75% to 84% likely to succeed. Now, success and failure are pretty complicated. They don't necessarily mean that you go completely broke, but you may need to make some adjustments, so let's talk about what does the success mean? We, again, cannot predict the future, so we say, Let's look back and say, You get dealt 1,000 hands. You're playing a game of cards and you get 1,000 hands. Some of those are good and some of those are bad, so the very good ones tend to be up here, near the top. And you actually end up with a lot of money left over. Some of them are not as good and you end up running out of money early. The median is, again, that one that's right in the middle when we line them up in order for best to worst. And so you might say, you're probably not going to get the best, you're probably not going to get the worst, although anything is possible.

So that's how we go with this likelihood of success. Now, maybe she doesn't want to work an extra year, so we can look at different ways of accomplishing things here. By the way, we've built in some long term care in case she does get sick and needs that at the end of life. She's looking to spend about 4,000 a month, that's after some health care costs that are going to inflate each year, and she's saving a decent amount in some 401K and taxable accounts.

Let's say she goes ahead and maxes out that Roth, is it going to make a big difference? Not really, 'cause she only has five years left. So what we do here is we start looking at all of these different variables and playing with the pieces and figuring out what does it take to make her successful at her retirement, or at least successful enough that she's comfortable making that transition. So here are some tips to improve your chances.

The first is to plan for long term care. If you're living on your own, you don't have somebody in the house who can help you do things, and it's arguable if even a couple is capable of managing this on their own… I mean, if you think about a couple, is one of the people physically able to move the other person around and do they have the skills to provide health care, and the time and the energy, frankly, to provide all that type of care? So it's important for everybody, but it's especially important for single people to plan for this care.

So you can look at getting insurance, you can look at budgeting for some costs, like we showed you in the software, you might want to budget for a much bigger number if you go into memory care or something like that with 24 hour supervision, it can get really expensive quickly. And you can explore different living arrangements, maybe doing things with friends or certain communities that might be a good fit for you. Next is to avoid leaving money on the table so if you were previously married and your spouse passed away or you've been divorced, you may be eligible for benefits. That's maybe from Social Security, you can potentially get a survivor's benefit, or if you were married for at least 10 years and you've been divorced, you can potentially get spousal benefits on your ex spouse's work record.

It's just important to explore all of these to see if there are any resources available for you. Next is to make a plan, and I am of course biased as a financial planner, but I think it is really helpful to go through the process, and the main goal isn't to get a big document that tells you what your financial plan is. Instead, really, the benefit is going through that process and learning a lot about your finances as you do it, and in that process, you get an idea of what the risks are, how you're doing, you might get confidence and clarity on whether or not you can go ahead and retire, if you should do certain things or not.

It's just a very valuable process for a lot of people, but I'll leave that for you to decide. If you found this video helpful, please leave a quick thumbs up. That gives me feedback that this is something you might enjoy more of, so thanks for watching and take care..

As found on YouTube

Retirement Planning Home

Read More

2 Retirement Tax Planning Strategies To Save THOUSANDS In Your Retirement Portfolio!

how would you like to save hundreds of thousands of dollars potentially in taxes in retirement well these two strategies I'm going to go through today when combined together have the potential to do just that now if you don't qualify for net unrealized appreciation because you don't have company stock inside your 401k you can still qualify for zero percent taxes on your long-term capital gains and dividends so when we combine these strategies together it creates a very powerful tax and income planning tool that you can use for your retirement [Music] foreign as you can tell I'm pretty excited about this video because we're going to discuss two tax planning strategies the net unrealized appreciation which I've not yet done a video on the YouTube channel about and also the zero percent taxation for long-term capital gains and dividends and you're going to want to stick around until the end of the video where I incorporate these two strategies into a real life financial planning case now unless you've searched net unrealized appreciation to find this video there's a pretty good chance you've never heard of net unrealized appreciation so in its most basic form it's when you have company stock that's been issued inside your 401k you have the option of rolling that money outside of your 401k not into an IRA but rolling it out only paying income tax on the basis that's been distributed and potentially pay long-term capital gains tax on the appreciation so that appreciation from where it was issued to where it is whenever you roll it out and retire or sever from service or become 59 and a half that's what's called your net unrealized appreciation we're here in Houston Texas where we have a lot of client clients that worked at Exxon Mobil or Chevron or some of the other big oil and gas companies we also have clients from all over the country that work for other companies that can take advantage of this net unrealized depreciation strategy so I'm going to use Exxon because we come across this plan a lot we're very familiar with the Exxon retirement plan and I want to illustrate how this concept works and there's some nuances here and there's also some financial planning considerations and of course tax ramifications that we're going to go through but if I worked at Exxon let's say from 1995 to 2020 and as part of my compensation I receive shares of stock each year over the course of my employment so these numbers are not historically accurate but I want to convey the the principle here so in the beginning years if Exxon was trading at twenty dollars and I received a hundred shares and then next year maybe I received them at 22 dollars per share and twenty five dollars per share and over time as I've received more shares as part of my compensation package the value has typically increases the price at which you were issued those shares in the year you received them is what's called your cost basis so if we do this Nua rollout that's the amount that you'll have to pay income taxes on but it's a really cool opportunity here because over time most stocks appreciate in value Exxon today is at a hundred and sixteen dollars per share so the concept of Nua is if I was issued stock at twenty dollars a share and I keep it in the IRA and now it's at 116 dollars a share that's a massive amount of capital appreciation and if I roll it to an IRA and distribute it at that point or at some point in the future I'm going to income taxes and that can can lead to a pretty big tax liability now we're down the road when I need income but if stocks appreciate it over time we typically have a mixed cost basis when it comes to the amount of shares that we've received from the company so first thing to know here and first thing to ask your company is do you guys provide a breakdown of the cost basis on an annual reporting period or do you take the average cost basis so we come across some companies here that they will provide you the information of the exact cost basis and the amount of shares that you've received in each year in that case we can really cherry pick which shares we want to roll out and really take advantage of this strategy because typically we're going to take the lower cost basis ones some companies don't allow you to cherry pick based on the lower basis shares that were issued they calculate an average cost basis for all the shares issued so this is not nearly as advantageous as being able to cherry pick sometimes it can still make sense especially if it's an older 401k or if it's a stock that has really really appreciated since those shares were issued in the average cost basis is down so this video my primary purpose is to help educate you around the financial planning considerations of the Nua rollout so I'm not going to cover all the rules and reg surrounding it I'll do that in a later video though but a couple things you should know this becomes an opportunity whenever you sever from service or typically when you're entering retirement there are some other qualifications but we'll cover those later now if you sever from service prior to age 55 you will be subject to a 10 penalty on the amount you distribute so just be aware that if you're under the age of 55 you've severed from service you have company stock inside your 401k that that 10 penalty for early distribution still applies we have Exxon this 401K here so the total value is about 1.5 million in this hypothetical example the shares the tote in totality the shares have been issued over the course of the working career equals about a six hundred thousand dollar cost basis so I'm going to use the example here where we can cherry pick the individual shares so the next question becomes which shares should I consider doing the Nua rollout because I don't have to roll all six hundred thousand basis out in the real world typically this 1.5 million of fair market value may also be comprised of mutual funds such as growth funds income Etc within the 401K for the purpose of this example Exxon stock is valued at 1.5 million dollars the cost basis of those Exxon shares within the 401K is 600 000.

Just want to point out in the real world typically everyone does not have all their money invested in their company stock but I've I've absolutely seen that over the years so the question becomes which shares do we want to take advantage of the annual rollout with the general rule of thumb is the lower cost basis Shares are more attractive and that's determined by the the value of the stock today anything above 50 percent cost basis to fair market value typically we don't want to consider for Nua now there are some extenuating circumstances sometimes with financial planning considerations that it may make sense but when we do the math and we extrapolate out looking at the value that you would have in the ira versus paying taxes on the basis now annual taxation for growth dividends Etc the Breakeven point isn't that attractive when we look at these shares that are above 50 percent cost basis to fair market value I personally like to see them around 20 or 30 percent really tops so whenever you have shares that are 10 15 20 25 cost basis to fair market value those are typically very attractive opportunities and in some situations Thirty thirty five forty percent could possibly make sense it just depends on the overall financial plan that you're putting together in other circumstances so this is a tax analysis so you may want to reach out to your CPA for help or assistance in doing this or your financial advisor if they're qualified and skilled enough to help you make these determinations I want to run through some numbers now so let's assume for whatever reason this person decides to do the whole Nua rollout so just so we understand the how this functionally works the 600 000 rolls out of the 401K into a non-ira account income tax is due on that six hundred thousand dollars you're probably looking at about a 27 28 maybe 30 percent effective tax rate we'll go with 30.

So 100 eighty thousand dollars of income taxes would be due on the basis being rolled out but in this scenario you're not just rolling out 600 000 That's the basis you're actually rolling 1.5 million dollars out of the 401K and only paying income tax on the basis now if you sell it immediately the net unrealized appreciation is the difference between the basis and the fair market value so you have nine hundred thousand dollars of gain there so if you sell that nine hundred thousand you're looking at the more preferential long-term capital gains tax that would be a pretty big tax still so the question becomes the are what planning considerations should we hold on to this stock do we feel comfortable having this much in one company what is our other wealth what if we break it out over a few years so this is what we're really going to dive into now I just want you to understand how this actually works in regards to the functionality okay let's cover how this actually works so we take the Exxon stock the basis is 600 000 but the full value is 1.5 million so if in this example we decide we want to do it all we would roll the full 1.5 million out of the 401K it will go into a non-ira account but you only owe income taxes on the basis the 600 000.

If you sell the stock immediately you will owe long-term capital gains tax which is a more preferential rate than income taxes at this level of income on the difference between the basis and the fair market value or nine hundred thousand there but you don't have to sell it right away if you don't sell it right away and then you sell it six months later you'll be subject to short-term capital gains tax because you're holding period rules take take into a place or taken to effect if you don't sell it immediately but if you wait 12 months after the distribution date 12 months in one day then you qualify for long-term capital gains tax treatment so some of the financial planning considerations are now what are the income taxes due what is my income and tax plan year one year two year three of retirement how does this fit into that overall tax and income plan and how do we optimize how do we reduce the total taxes we pay while maximizing the value that we retain if we have to pay income taxes on six hundred thousand dollars you're looking at an effective tax rate there of about 27 28 maybe 30 percent so 30 on 600 is a hundred and eighty Grand so you'd write that check to Uncle Sam and you would have 1.5 million outside of the 401K in the more preferential tax environment of long-term capital gains and dividends now you would have annual taxation on these dividends so that's something else we need to consider and we also need to consider future tax rates and make assumptions with what do we think income tax rates are going to be in the future long-term capital gains and dividend rates all of these things go into the analysis but for now this is the logistics of how it works we roll it all out pay income taxes on the basis we can either sell it immediately and pay long-term capital gains on the differential or we can hold it and if we hold it past the distribution date sell it within 12 months short-term capital gains sell it post 12 months long-term capital gains okay so I want to dive deeper into the two options we have just high level so option A is We Roll everything to the IRA we do not take advantage of the Nua rollout eligibility things that we have to consider here is future tax rates rmds other income sources and the secure act now this is not an exhaustive list this is just some of the big ones we have to take and consider future tax rates because when everything is inside that tax infested Ira when you distribute it in the future you have to pay income taxes you've given up the ability to take advantage of long-term capital gains and dividend taxes which are typically a preferential rate rmds Force distributions from your retirement account and when added with other income we oftentimes see people who did not plan for this have 150 200 250 even more of income because of required minimum distributions and their other income so when doing this analysis we have to extrapolate out and look at these factors to help make the decision today secure act I threw this in here because it forces distribution of your retirement accounts if they go to a non-spouse beneficiary that's more than 10 years younger than you full distribution of the retirement account within 10 years so if you have kids and it's important to leave this money to your children if they have income and they're working and now your retirement account has to be fully distributed within 10 years that could be a massive amount of income going on top of their income which now 30 40 50 60 potentially of your retirement account has gone to Uncle Sam if you live in a state with income taxes that could be an issue as well inheritance taxes so a lot of issues here rolling everything into the IRA you can be hit with um pretty big income taxes down the road option b is we do take advantage of the Nua rollout either wholly or in a partial Nua rollout how that works is we would take the shares that we do decide to take advantage of this strategy and we roll them into the non-ira account some things to consider there is that what are long-term capital gain rates now what are they possibly going to be in the future but also we have annual taxation of the dividends and if we're buying and selling inside that account whatever we do not roll into the non-ira account with the strategy the rest of the funds from your 401k go into the IRA and then of course whatever's left here we have the same considerations that I went through over here so now there are financial planning considerations here let's say I was at 35 cost basis to fair market value so I'm kind of right there where mathematically it may not make sense but how much non-qualified money do I have how much essentially I'm saying how much do you have outside of your retirement accounts because if you're entering retirement and all that money is inside that tax infested 401K then you don't have any ability to manipulate what goes on your 1040 your tax return by manipulate I mean we determine which accounts were withdrawing income from to manage our taxable income that we report to the IRS if we pull from our non-qualified accounts think your bank account well you don't have to report that so if you need a hundred thousand a year we pull 50 from your bank and 50 from your IRA you get your 100 000 but only fifty thousand goes on the tax return that's how we can manipulate that so how much non-qualified money do you have if you don't have much we may want to consider doing a little bit higher Nua rollout because even mathematically it may not make sense when we just compare that decision in isolation to do or not to do the Nua rollout but when we now look at the other benefits that we're receiving such as the ability to do Roth conversions the ability to manipulate what goes on our 1040 the ability to possibly qualify for a health care subsidy if you retire before the age of 65 by managing the reportable or taxable income that's reportable we can qualify for a subsidy so this is why we're so big on financial planning because as you can see it's not just about Investment Management in retirement that's important absolutely but when we tie in financial planning with Investment Management we can create some really optimal scenarios where we're creating a ton of value and helping you have more income pay less tax and ultimately have more value throughout the course of your retirement okay this is the part that I mentioned in the beginning of the video where we're going to tie into kind of a real world plan planning case so we laid the groundwork for what Nua is and some of the considerations that you have to make in order to determine if it makes sense for you to do the Nua rollout so what I want to point out here is the tax and income plan for retirement years one two and three for someone who takes advantage of the Nua rollout because the question becomes when do we sell that stock if we have 30 40 50 percent of our entire net worth in our company stock it's pretty risky to hold on to that position just so we don't pay more in taxes so here's where we're going to tie the financial planning considerations of the real world application and decisions we have to make on the Nua rollout with years one two and three of someone just entering retirement one of the big risks is if we roll it out the company's stock and we decide not to sell it because we don't want to pay the long-term capital gains immediately if we hold on to that that concentrated Equity position we have increased our risk now there are investment strategies that can be used such as buying a put option or what we call an Equity caller but I want to just talk about the tax and income plan here so in this scenario client rolls out the annual way so they have a large concentrated Equity position and they've paid income tax on the basis but do not want to sell the company stock yet so as part of the tax and income plan what I want to show you is we could break this up so year two year three and even year four possibly depending on the size of the concentrated Equity position Company stock where zero percent taxes essentially so we have total income here of a hundred and twenty thousand so what this is the tax and income strategy where we're generating income year two of retirement not year one because in year one you've done the the Nua rollout you have a big tax liability from paying income taxes on the cost basis of that company stock so here's your two so year two the the tax and income strategy is don't take anything out of the 401K no Roth conversions we're going to sell the company stock that we previously rolled out take advantage of Nua and we can have a hundred and twenty thousand dollars of income here as long as it's all capital gains and dividends your total tax liability 458 dollars now what I've done here is assumed twenty thousand dollars of dividends because if you have company stock and you roll it out it probably paid some dividends so 20K there and a hundred thousand of long-term capital gains we're realizing we're recognizing so this is darn near zero percent on a hundred and twenty thousand dollars of retirement income and we're divesting from that company stock now again some risk management strategies we could have an equity caller or put option helping to support downside volatility of that concentrated position but just taxing in complaining wise I want to show you how how this can work out so here now I've added 125 000 of long-term capital gains with twenty thousand dollars of dividends total AGI 145 000 the total tax 4208 on 145k of income 2.9 percent so again we've divested so maybe this is year two of retirement or year three we've divested from the company stock we've reduced our risk we've provided the income that we needed for retirement and we've done so in a way that's tax advantaged same thing goes on now I wanted to point this one out because I've here I've thrown in the same 20 000 of dividends 125 000 of long-term capital gains so we're selling the stock again but now we also take advantage of a twenty thousand dollar Ira distribution so this is which accounts do we pull income from in retirement how do we generate income what's the tax plan total AGI comes up to 165 the total tax is 7208 but here's the cool part the IRS ordering rules for how you pay tax on income based on where that income is generated the distribution from the IRA is actually tax-free but what happens is when you take money out of the IRA it brings some of those long-term capital gains into taxation so I did a video not too long ago where we talked about adjustments and Social Security and IRA distributions and wealth conversion taxes the tax code is filled with these where if we we take one more dollar of income it brings one other item into now a taxable State such as Social Security or long-term capital gains or dividends so just just be aware of that I guess 165 000 of income seven thousand two hundred and eight dollars in income taxes representing a four point four percent tax rate so now one two three four years into retirement we've divested the uh concentrated stock risk we provided income and a very tax advantaged manner we still have that Ira with a lot of money in it to deal with but once this is done we would probably at that point start down the Roth conversion path now every situation is different but hopefully these topics and ideas and and considerations when it comes to risk management income planning tax planning and retirement will help you have a better retirement if you want to learn in more detail how to potentially pay zero percent in long-term capital gains and on your dividends click this video right here I did a couple years ago where we do a deeper dive into the special tax advantage [Music] thank you

As found on YouTube

Retirement Planning Home

Read More

Retirement Planning for Singles

Retirement is a big deal for anybody, and that's especially true for single people who may be retiring with just one income and who may have built up a nest egg solely off their own savings. So, we know that single people can and do retire comfortably. In fact, one quarter of people over age 60 are living alone in their household, and that number is slightly higher for women, and that's, of course, due to women's longevity. So what we're going to talk about here is retirement for single people. First, we'll go over some averages to give you a rough idea of what the landscape looks like for single people, then we'll get into how much money you might need as you go into retirement, then we'll talk about some tips that can help improve the chances of retiring comfortably. Let's start with the average retirement income for single people. So it's $42,000 on average for an individual in retirement, and that comes from the US Census Bureau. The median is a little bit lower at $27,000.

So a friendly reminder of how this works: The median is the middle, so if you line up all of the survey results, people telling you what their income is, for example, that arrow points at the middle observation, which would give us the median down at the bottom. But if we go to the average, that is going to get skewed by, in this case, wealthy people, for example, they have a very high income. When it comes to Social Security, the average is about $1,500 a month or $18,000 per year.Your level depends, of course on your earnings, if you had higher earnings during your working years, then you tend to potentially have a bigger benefit than that, and it could be lower, and then of course, your claiming age is also an important thing. If you claim early at age 62, you get a reduced benefit. That's likely to bring down the amount you get.

Next, we have pensions, some people get an income from a job they worked at. That might be in the public sector as a teacher, a firefighter, that sort of thing, or even in the private sector, you could have a pension from your job, and those incomes just are all over the board, it could be high, it could be low, but these are different sources of income that people might have in retirement. This is just a friendly reminder that this is just one video and it may cover some interesting information, but it's not specific to you so I hope you'll do a lot more research, hopefully check with some professionals and get some individualized advice, and that way you can improve the chances of things going well for you.

So now let's talk about how much you might need as you go into retirement. Unfortunately, there's no single answer on what you need because it depends. So the first step is to figure out what sort of income you're going to need, and I've got other videos on that, I'll put links in the description to get you some more information, but you can look at replacing a portion of your income, or you can just say, I want X amount of dollars per year, or you can go with other approaches, but first we need to know how much income you are hoping for. Next, we tally up your income sources, so that might be some guaranteed income that comes in from Social Security, for example, or from your pension at your workplace, but that forms a base of income and that might or might not cover what you need. But it gives us a base and then if we need to fill that in, we can supplement withdrawals from your retirement savings, so that might be out of your IRA, your 401, 403, these accounts that you have built up over time can provide supplemental income to help fill the gap between that guaranteed income you get and the amount you actually want to spend.

There are a number of ways to figure out how much to withdraw and to set up different strategies, there might be bucking strategies, there might be withdrawal strategies like the 4% rule. Or if you don't like that, make it the 3% rule to be safer, or take out more if you think that's not enough and you're selling yourself short. Ultimately, there are a number of ways to approach this, so you just pick one that works well for you, and again, I can point you to some resources on figuring that out. And finally, you will want to look at taxes and inflation, so during your retirement years, it's reasonable to assume that prices may increase on many of the things you buy, so we want your income to be able to increase as well, Social Security typically does rise, but maybe not at the same rate as the things you're buying, so your withdrawals may need to account for that.

Plus we've got taxes. You typically will owe taxes if you're taking distributions or you're taking withdrawals from pre tax retirement accounts. If you have a pension that might be taxable as well. We just want to look at all of these things and figure out what your ultimate money left over to spend each month is going to be. For an over simplified example, let's just look at Jane Doe.

She's 60 years old, she's single, she wants to retire in about five years, she makes about 80,000 a year and has 700,000. A lot of people retire with less than that, a lot of people retire with more. I'm going to bring up my financial planning software that I use with clients, and we'll just go over kind of why there's no single answer on how much you need. Now, if you can tell me exactly how long you'll live and what the markets will do and what inflation will look like, we can tell you exactly what you'll need. But there are a lot of unknowns, so a lot of times we start with a probability of success and I'll go over what that means, and then we look at little tweaks and how different changes might affect that probability of success, so working an extra year might bring her from…

Let's say 75% to 84% likely to succeed. Now, success and failure are pretty complicated. They don't necessarily mean that you go completely broke, but you may need to make some adjustments, so let's talk about what does the success mean? We, again, cannot predict the future, so we say, Let's look back and say, You get dealt 1,000 hands. You're playing a game of cards and you get 1,000 hands. Some of those are good and some of those are bad, so the very good ones tend to be up here, near the top. And you actually end up with a lot of money left over. Some of them are not as good and you end up running out of money early. The median is, again, that one that's right in the middle when we line them up in order for best to worst.

And so you might say, you're probably not going to get the best, you're probably not going to get the worst, although anything is possible. So that's how we go with this likelihood of success. Now, maybe she doesn't want to work an extra year, so we can look at different ways of accomplishing things here. By the way, we've built in some long term care in case she does get sick and needs that at the end of life. She's looking to spend about 4,000 a month, that's after some health care costs that are going to inflate each year, and she's saving a decent amount in some 401K and taxable accounts. Let's say she goes ahead and maxes out that Roth, is it going to make a big difference? Not really, 'cause she only has five years left. So what we do here is we start looking at all of these different variables and playing with the pieces and figuring out what does it take to make her successful at her retirement, or at least successful enough that she's comfortable making that transition.

So here are some tips to improve your chances. The first is to plan for long term care. If you're living on your own, you don't have somebody in the house who can help you do things, and it's arguable if even a couple is capable of managing this on their own… I mean, if you think about a couple, is one of the people physically able to move the other person around and do they have the skills to provide health care, and the time and the energy, frankly, to provide all that type of care? So it's important for everybody, but it's especially important for single people to plan for this care. So you can look at getting insurance, you can look at budgeting for some costs, like we showed you in the software, you might want to budget for a much bigger number if you go into memory care or something like that with 24 hour supervision, it can get really expensive quickly.

And you can explore different living arrangements, maybe doing things with friends or certain communities that might be a good fit for you. Next is to avoid leaving money on the table so if you were previously married and your spouse passed away or you've been divorced, you may be eligible for benefits. That's maybe from Social Security, you can potentially get a survivor's benefit, or if you were married for at least 10 years and you've been divorced, you can potentially get spousal benefits on your ex spouse's work record. It's just important to explore all of these to see if there are any resources available for you.

Next is to make a plan, and I am of course biased as a financial planner, but I think it is really helpful to go through the process, and the main goal isn't to get a big document that tells you what your financial plan is. Instead, really, the benefit is going through that process and learning a lot about your finances as you do it, and in that process, you get an idea of what the risks are, how you're doing, you might get confidence and clarity on whether or not you can go ahead and retire, if you should do certain things or not. It's just a very valuable process for a lot of people, but I'll leave that for you to decide. If you found this video helpful, please leave a quick thumbs up. That gives me feedback that this is something you might enjoy more of, so thanks for watching and take care..

As found on YouTube

Retirement Planning Home

Read More

Are Gold IRA Investments Taxable?

Are gold IRA investments taxable?
No! Thankfully, when you use a self-directed IRA to buy gold, so long as you're holding
it at a US depository, when you sell the gold, all gains will
flow back to your IRA with no tax. In addition to diversification,
the advantage of generating tax-free returns from your gold IRA investment
is what makes it so popular.

As found on YouTube

401K to Gold IRA Rollover

Read More

Retirement Planning: Are you Ready for Retirement? with Oak Harvest Retirement Success Plan

[Music] welcome to the retirement income show on Market Lane alongside the CEO and founder of Oak Harvest Financial Group that of course is Troy sharp Troy is a certified financial planner professional his team at Oak Harvest is incredible if you want to go to the website to learn more elk Harvest financialgroup.com Oak Harvest fg.com works as well a lot of great information on the website you can learn about Jared Kinney Ryan Kenny you can learn about Chris Paris Jessica canella the whole team there's just a phenomenal team Oak Harvest financialgroup.com and of course you can always go to the YouTube channel there's over 300 videos on there about any topic you can think about in the financial world the retirement world uh it's phenomenal and there's no cost you subscribe you'll know when all the new ones are out but there's no cost to any of that YouTube check out Troy sharp and Oak Harvest Troy's office located at 921 oral City Way I-10 and Bunker Hill they they are here for you if you need help they would love to help they just don't know if they can help until you reach out and you can do that just by giving them a call 800-822-64-34-800-822-64 34 today we're going to be talking the retirement success plan Troy is going to explain what this is and it's the process so it's about investment planning income planning tax planning health planning Estate Planning and they all go together Social Security and Medicare are in there as well you know you've done this for a long time you sat down with a lot of people so you kind of understand the common mistakes the common things that we Overlook as well this will be good going through the retirement success plan how are you going to inform us today of this retirement success plan well just like we have as humans we have basic needs right we have that hierarchy of we need shelter we need food we need security in retirement or once we get to retirement people have their the same concerns the same questions we all have the same let's call it fears do we have enough you know can you retire when can you retire how much can you spend when you do retire without the fear of running out of money we all want to pay less tax right the government can get their fair share but not a not a penny more and whatever that fair share is it's it's defined differently based on your plan so if you take the government's plan there they want to get as much from you as possible and the tax law is set up in a way that if you don't plan for taxes in retirement oftentimes we see people in situations where if they keep doing what they're doing 200 300 500 800 we sat down with a client prospective client recently and we're doing this analysis it was well over a million dollars in taxes if he kept doing the his way of things the way that his advisor had him doing it in regards to his income plan and tax plan and retirement well there was no tax plan obviously but his income plan was going to lead create this domino effect of his tax bill being over the course of time over the course of 25 years over a million dollars in estimated taxes that he was going to pay that he simply didn't have to pay if he went about a different approach the approach that I'm going to talk with you about today as far as step three of our retirement success process the tax planning aspect so just like we have basic needs as human beings we have basic concerns when it comes to retirement and we've created the structured process and that's the beautiful thing about the retirement success plan is it's a plan that is something that is actionable but it's also living and breathing it's something we will review with you throughout the year once you're a client but it's also a process and we believe in structure here we're really big on structure and process and that keeps us organized that keeps us on schedule and that keeps us ahead of the planning curve in order to do the things that we promise for everyone that's entrusted so much to us and I'm talking about your retirement you worked for 30 years 40 years 50 years in some cases and you save up whether it's five hundred thousand dollars or five million or 50 million you need a team of people that of course are knowledgeable but before education and certifications and designations and training and experience first and foremost you need somebody that cares okay if you start there with someone that's a fiduciary and not just you can be a fiduciary and still do the wrong thing I've seen it for years in the industry where fiduciary advisors still sell mutual funds that have high fees and commissions and they can make justifications for why they're selling them or why they think you're they're in your best interest I don't believe that they are personally um we would never put someone into a mutual fund that is charging a five percent front end commission and then you know has two or two and a half percent of hidden fees and we've seen that for for years coming from fiduciary firms fiduciary advisors so you start with from Ground Zero are you working with somebody who truly cares who's truly passionate about retirement so with that philosophy in mind that's the foundation of of what we look at when we hire people here at Oak Harvest Financial Group you could have all the designations in the world all the education all the experience but if if you're arrogant if you're not humble if you're not hungry if you're not continuing strive to be continuing to strive to be a better person we don't want you to work here because that foundational element do you care about the people that you're working with on a human level if that's not there then you know we don't want any part of that type of person I don't care how much you produce how what the metrics are when it comes to how we measure advisor performance so that's the foundation now once you have someone that cares you want a structured process in place to deal with those big questions that you have the big concerns that you have so do you have enough yet it's not just a yes or no question it's a function of how much do you spend what is your health situation if you're healthy yes of course you're going to live longer most likely but are you planning for the increased medical costs in increased probability of needing long-term care or Assisted Living these are aspects that healthier people do have to absolutely be concerned about those that are less healthy it's less likely you're going to have a two or three year four or five year stay in a long-term care facility or need nurses in the home so when we talk about do you have enough and can you retire these are all the answers to those questions are function of how much do you spend what is your longevity what is your health situation your of course your family history um but not only that it's what are we doing with the other aspects of this process meaning the income planning side the tax planning side what about the health care side you know are you retiring before Medicare do we need to look at some type of Health Care planning that qualifies you to receive a subsidy so you're not paying two thousand dollars a month for both spouses for health insurance that maybe we get it down to 400 a month or 600 a month or maybe no out-of-pocket costs whatsoever for health insurance premiums you can do that with proper planning but you need the right type of asset structure meaning if you have all your money in retirement accounts this is where tax planning comes in when you take money out that goes on to your 1040 your tax return and then you probably aren't going to qualify for as big a subsidy as if you had money saved and non-ira accounts so this the structuring of income planning tax planning Health Care planning and then of course the estate side of things this is all what the oak Harvest retirement success process the retirement success plan is and that's what you receive when you become a client it is a very clear and structured process that we go through but then it's also a plan that is living and breathing and we're making adjustments as time goes on tax law changes economic conditions change goals change your spending levels will change it retirement is and we've only learned this you know from years and years of experience the best delayed plans we can't just set him and forget them you know plans need constant monitoring just like a plant or a garden or you know a human being so the retirement success process we're going to get into today to to today we're going to focus on the first three steps the first step is risk management and investment planning next step is income planning so income planning is social security when do we take that it's not just based on the math which it does play a role but when we start to look at are you a conservative investor okay versus an aggressive investor investor that plays into the Social Security election decision of course your Health and Longevity plays in market conditions okay are we in a recession when you're thinking about taking social security are your accounts down 20 30 percent or did we have a really really good year last year and it looks like we're gonna have a good year this year all of these factors kind of tie in to that income planning component as well as many other we're going to talk about and then the big one we're gonna we're gonna get into is tax planning that's step three of the retirement success process and when you start to understand that retirement is a set of dominoes when you're young you work you put the kids through school you deal with traffic you deal with bosses you deal with if you run your own business all the headaches that come with that you deal with so many different things money is really really simple it's life that's complicated in the accumulation phase once we get to retirement now life gets a little bit more simple it's the money it's the decisions you have to make and the realization that every single decision you make how you invest the portfolio impacts not not only how much income you can take today but how much income you can take down the road the sequence of returns risk based on how you've invested sequence of returns is if the market goes down and you're also taking money out you exacerbate that downturn in the market because there's no paychecks coming in you're you're pulling money out and losing in the market so these decisions every single one that you make it's a domino effect it impacts everything else it impacts the tax plan it impacts the income strategy can impact the health care it can impact absolutely the estate plan so we walk you through this process so we have a plan in place we call it the retirement success plan and the goal is for you to have security first and foremost but what I find most often is the outcome is that people feel more comfortable they feel more secure and they're able to enjoy retirement a bit more because they've they have a plan in place that addresses all these certain needs but also through the continual monitoring and adjusting and conversations one thing I love about our process is when someone comes to us and we have that first meeting where it's just get to know you you know no pressure no obligation no cost we get the information we do an analysis between that first and that second visit and then when we come back on that second visit you actually get to see what it's like to be a client at Oak Harvest Financial Group because that second visit with us we're starting to go through the foundation of a financial plan we're starting to discuss the decisions that you have to make not only this year but in the future so that's almost exactly what it's like to have an annual review with us or a semi-annual review with us so I love that about our process is that you get to see before you ever decide to become a client what it's like to actually be a client when we have up on the big television screen all of the information the choices you have to make the impact of making different decisions how it impacts your taxes how it impacts your income how it impacts your account balances when we do a sensitivity analysis and and show you okay this outcome in the market and this outcome for income decisions versus this one here are the possible outcomes for those choices and that those combination of choices so you get to see what it's like to actually be a client just through our normal process of going through that first second and third visit with us many Engineers it takes a little bit longer than that sometimes it's four or five visits but our goal is to Simply provide value we want to make deposits in your life we want to provide value and you know people see that value and they say you know what I think you guys could be a great part of my financial team my retirement team and yes I want to work with you Troy so if that's you if you don't have a retirement success plan if you don't have a tax plan income plan if you don't understand the guard rails what I'm going to get into in this next segment as far as risk management in retirement give us a call we want you to leave a message there's no one here working on the weekends if you're watching this on YouTube if you're listening to this later and it's during the week sure give us a call someone will pick up but we want to have a conversation just to see what's important to you who you are if you're a good fit for what we do and of course you can ask questions to see if we're a good fit for you and then we'll schedule that first visit there's no cost no obligation we can do it through Zoom we can do it in person at the office right here at I-10 and Bunker Hill in Memorial City and that first visit we'll have a cup of coffee a glass of water and just get to know each other and if we are a good fit at that point we'll get that second scheduled we'll do the analysis that I talked about and we'll walk you through that retirement success process so you can have those big questions answered do you have enough can you retire and how do you pay less tax 1-800-822-6434 1-800-822-6434 Oak Harvest Financial Group check out the YouTube channel check out the website Oak Harvest Financial Group so when you think about this this is what I think you should really like about it it's you're working with the team at Oak Harvest for your retirement right to coming up with that retirement success plan you're the CEO it's your retirement look at Troy and the team at Oak Harvest as your Chief Financial Officer here to help guide you you're going to make the decisions they're going to give you the choices right and it's up to you because it is your retirement it's your hopes and dreams your bucket list and all of that it's really important though that they understand your feelings your thoughts your hopes your dreams it is about you so you've got to talk to them and they're here to listen and they're here to help again that number is 800-822-6434 risk management how important is it what actually is it Troy we'll explain when we come back this is the retirement income show with Troy sharp out of Oak Harvest Financial Group back right after this investment advisory services offered through Oak Harvest Financial Group LLC Oak Harbor's Financial Group is an independent Financial Services firm that helps people create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products investing involves risk including the loss of principal any references to protection benefits or lifetime income generally refer to fixed Insurance products never Securities or investment products insurance and annuity product guarantees are backed by the financial strength and claims paying ability of the issuing insurance company Oak Harbor's Financial Group LLC is not permitted to offer a No statement made during this show shall constitute tax or legal advice you should speak to a qualified professional before making any decisions about your personal situation we are not affiliated with the US government or any governmental agency this radio show is a paid placement foreign [Music]

As found on YouTube

Retirement Planning Home

Read More