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ZERO Savings at 50? Plan for Retirement NOW đź’°

What are we doing here? What's going on?
>>What are we doing here? >>This is a super-simple game. We're fishing for advice. Give me that.
>>See, I chose the right outfit today.
Yeah. [Fishing for Advice With Financial Advisers] I know you guys are probably thinking
I'm a professional fisherman, but I'm not. I'm a financial coach. You are 50 years old and have not started
saving for retirement. What is the first thing you do? Panic! No, I'm just kidding.

So, at 50 years old, that is a big
wake-up call for a lot of people, and the very first thing you do is take stock of where your money is going today, because
you are gonna need to seriously amp up your saving. So, not everybody needs to
have some giant savings. You need to have enough to replace the amount of income
you're gonna spend in retirement. I'm gonna just cheat a little, because I'm
really embarrassed. So I would just take a minute to assess my full
financial picture and actually sit down with the numbers to take financial
inventory. So I think step 1 is just going through what are all the
accounts I have, what is everything I own, what's the value of everything I own, and
then making another list of everything that I owe. And then from there you can
be like, "OK, well, this is the money that I actually do have, and so maybe there's a
better way for me to maximize this for my retirement." I feel like 50 is the new 20 or
30, you know, still not too late.

Yeah, don't think that it's over.
Consider it like a halftime. This is where you go
into the locker room and you look at what you did in the first half and what
can be done better for the second half. You come up with a new strategy, a new game plan, and then you go out into the second half,
and you prepare to win the game. [Cheering] I have to say this is the weirdest game
I've ever played at a FinCon.

You're 50 years old — I am 50 years old — and
have not started saving for retirement. What's the first thing you do? You breathe, and you don't panic, and you start now. What you should not do is
think, "Well, it's too late now, so let's just see what happens in the next 20, 30
years." Because that is going to lead to disaster. You still have time to turn this around,
but you have to get serious about this now. So you would talk to a
financial planner, come up with a game plan of how you can reduce your spending,
how you could put extra money into savings, and how you can kind of catch up. Once you've found the money, you are gonna automate the flows into those IRAs and 401(k)s, because if you don't automate it, you're gonna force
yourself to go through this exercise again and again, but if you set it and
forget it, you will continue to make headway.

All right, here we go. It’s why I got this net, man. The first thing I want you to do, I want you to take positive action. I want you to look around this minute, right now, and make a decision on some things you're gonna change. And it might be your attitude, it might be
the way that you're spending money, it might be the way that you're even looking at money. Be positive.
You know, it's not over till it's over. You can do it, you just have to start
doing it right now. Whoops! All right, everyone, listen. Gaining
information is absolutely imperative. It keeps you aware and it keeps you motivated. So be sure to subscribe to AARP's YouTube channel. OK, come on. All right. I'm just gonna pick these
fish up. OK! [Laughter].

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Retirement Planning During Bear Markets – Especially if It’s Your First One In Retirement

bear markets can feel a lot different when you're retired and you're no longer earning income from work especially if this is your first bear Market since you stopped working when you were younger you know you had time on your side you know you may have even seen drops in the market as an opportunity because it gave you additional time and you got to purchase more shares well things were on sale so to speak but now most likely that's not the case the relationship between our money and our accounts now are of money going out versus money going in to put it simply and plus you may have noticed that there's this psychological component now around money and not wanting to mess things up because the decisions we make really carried much more weight now when we're close to or in retirement and it's really that's not only psychological or emotional it's true because planning the distributions is much more complex than the the planning around around saving and putting money into the investment accounts what led to our investment success the last 30 years is a lot different than what's going to lead to success the next 20 or 30 years or at last that's at least what we've been seeing at streamline Financial since 1998 since we've been around so I want to share how to endure through bad markets if you're close to retirement or you're already retired and then what you can do to actually take advantage of of this even if you're already retired and you're no longer saving money and we're going to do that because we know a universal law of physics that can't be disproven and we can actually apply it to our retirement and make it a little bit better if you're thinking Dave what the heck are you talking about here's a brief explanation so Newton's third law of motion is that every action there's an equal and opposite reaction right you've heard that before so the way that I see it is there's a positive to every negative and the same thing there's a negative to every positive it's the law of polarity so I want to share what the positive is to take advantage of during bad markets and by the way if I haven't met you yet I'm Dave zoller and Tim and Luke and I and Sean we run streamline Financial it's a retirement planning firm and we've been around like I had said since 98 so we've seen clients really go through it all the.com bust the financial crisis and then covet and then all the things in between all those uh you know those mini panics that we've had so we created this channel to share what's working and what has worked for them and so that you can hopefully glean some wisdom from them and then apply it to your your own life so the first thing we need to be aware of is that the previous 30 years there were four bear Market Corrections so that's a drop of 20 or more and then the 30 years before that there was a total of five bear Market Corrections so the main takeaway is we need to expect these bear markets to happen during our retirement during that next 20 30 years right the second thing is we don't want to make a change solely on an emotion right and it's not not just making a drastic change like selling everything and putting everything under the mattress right it's we were just talking to someone yesterday and emotions can cause us not to take an action when we know doing so is actually the Smart Financial thing to do for instance during March of 2020 when it wasn't easy to rebalance your accounts it was very difficult to do but if you did follow through and and do the correct rebalancing system or strategy if you were looking back now it could have made a lot of sense the third thing is update your income plan because that helps guide us and make really good planning decisions around our investment plan so it's really start with the income plan you've heard that before and that helps us make the investment decisions versus the other way around and updating your income plan during bad markets that can also give you some confidence as well as you're looking at where we are today and then looking at over the next few years and and seeing that things maybe aren't as bad as it might seem at least when you've got those two things of the unknown and then the known updating the plan is the known and you can get a little bit better picture on what the future might look like for you now to the two things that maybe could give us an advantage during a time like this this is back to the law of polarity so the possible things that we might be able to use here are well first before I say it as always this is not specific advice to you so we're not looking at your your plan together so before you do anything just talk to a financial professional but idea number one to think about is tax loss harvesting that could be a way to write off some of the losses while still keeping your investment strategy intact and I talk about this concept a lot more in other videos so I'm not going to go into details on it today but just keep that in mind the one thing to to really pay attention to though when we're we're talking about the law or talking about tax loss harvesting is that wash sale rule right so look for the other videos or talk to that Financial professional before thinking about doing that the second thing that could be a possible opportunity for really the first time in a very long time is that ability or option to lock in higher yields in that conservative bucket as you know the the bucket strategy you've seen that before where we've got the possible three buckets and having that conservative bucket here is a great way to plan out and prepare for for bad markets and now at the time of this recording some of those historically conservative asset classes are paying a higher interest a higher yield than what we've seen really over the last decade which could be a silver lining during this period of time so those are just two things possible things to look at which maybe could be taken advantage of by you for for your benefit so those are just two things to think about during this period of time that we're in right now if that short video was helpful please like this and then share it with others if you think it could help them too and if you'd like to talk more about your plan feel free to reach out to me in the in the description below or go to our website streamlinedplanning.com for get you click on the get started button we don't always have space available but you'll hear back from me either way so I hope that was helpful and then I'll see you in the next video

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👉Retirement Planning At 60 in 2024 – 6 Tipsđź’Ą

imagine this you're approaching your 60s and starting to think about retirement you've worked hard all your life and it's time to enjoy the fruits of your labor but before you kick back and relax it's time to get laser focused on your retirement plan in this video we'll cover six important tips to help you plan for your retirement at 60. tip one assess your financial situation Jane has a woman who's been working as a nurse for 30 years she's always been Frugal and saved as much as she could but she's not sure she's accumulated enough for a comfortable retirement to assess her financial situation she makes a list of all her assets and her expenses she realizes that she needs to save more if she wants to maintain her lifestyle in retirement tip two explore different retirement options Bob's a 62 year old man has been working as an engineer for the last 40 years his employer has a 401k and he's been contributing to it for years Bob also explores other retirement options such as an IRA to maximize his retirement savings tip three diversify your Investments Mike is a 65 year old man who's been retired for a few years he Diversified his portfolio by investing in many different stock and bond index funds by diversifying his Investments might minimize risk and ensure a stable retirement income tip 4 plan for health care costs Sarah is a 63 year old woman who's been working as a teacher for the last 35 years she's healthy now but she knows health care costs can be expensive in retirement to plan for health care costs Sarah bought long-term care insurance to cover any medical expenses that could arise in the future tip five consider your Social Security benefits Tom is a 64 year old man's been working in construction for the last 45 years he's not sure when to start receiving his social security benefits he decides to wait till 67 to start taking his social security so he'll get a higher benefit which will give him a more comfortable retirement tip six have an actual retirement plan in place Lisa is a 61 year old woman has been working as a sales manager for the last 25 years she has a plan in place that includes a budget for her retirement expenses and a plan for Hospital spend her time in retirement Lisa plans to travel volunteer and take up a new hobby in retirement to stay active and engaged following these tips and learning from the experience of others you can ensure a comfortable and fulfilling retirement it's a great idea to consult with a good financial advisor click on the link in the description if you'd like to set a time to talk with us

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Retirement Planning FACTORS | Age and Income

what to look for when selecting the right 
retirement plan so age is a big factor when   it comes to deciding which plan is right for you 
if you're offered a pension that's fantastic not   many companies do offer those nowadays however 
if you have the benefit of getting one then yes   take it but I also think you should also have a 
retirement plan in addition to your pension just   to diversify your savings another situation to 
consider is your financial situation so someone   with a higher income level is most likely going 
to want to prefer choosing their own retirement   plan because then they're going to be able to 
not only write off those contributions but also   distribute it later in life so it maximizes their 
potential to not incur penalties or other taxable   income kind of situations essentially the more 
money you make you're looking for more write-offs   you're looking to claim less you're looking to 
you know have security but you got to be a little   more deaf and clever in how you're taking your 
distributions so to not trigger taxable events

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Pay This Off Before You Retire – Retirement Planning Tips

in this video we'll look at what expenses you should think about getting rid of before retiring and a few mistakes that retirees make when it comes to expenses in retirement there's a few things that you may want to say goodbye to before you say goodbye to that wage or that work income we're going to cover this in three parts it's going to look like this first we'll go over needs and wants and then what i'd call highway robbery and then also what to ear mark in retirement we've seen that the retirees that can get rid of these expenses before retiring have a little bit more breathing room and they feel better about their retirement plan because when you're planning for retirement we usually think about really two types of expenses it's the needs which are the essentials the absolute must-haves to just live you know as you think about my maslow's hierarchy of needs those things at the base layer and then there's the wants which are the the nice to have things but then there are other types of expenses that really don't fit into that category of needs or wants those are the things that we need to be done with before retirement and by the way i'm dave zoller and me and my team we run streamline financial it's a wealth management firm focused on retirement planning and we've been helping people personally for 13 years and streamlines been around for 22 years and we created this channel to share what's working with our clients so that you can benefit too so if you're close to retirement be sure to subscribe because i share one new video each week to make your retirement a little bit better i also put some free resources in the description below like my favorite diy retirement planner if you're more of a do-it-yourselfer so let's get into the list and then as you're watching if i leave something out please share it in the comments below i'd love to hear from you and then also i'll try to reply back to depending on how many comments i get so the first two you will probably agree with but you might not be thinking about the other ones and i want to show you ways to prepare and just make sure that your retirement is a little bit smoother by using our retirement planning software the first one which you already know is to pay off high interest debt which i sometimes think of as highway robbery it's when those interest rates are just so high and they're charging people it just seems unfair right that high interest debt i'm referring to is usually credit card debt and sometimes it's student loan debt and you'd be surprised at the number of people who in their first year of retirement they still have a large monthly payment towards credit card payments or student loan debt and this should be the number one thing that we should focus on to really reduce before we say goodbye to that job income or that wage because if you retire with credit card debt and then you get serious about paying it off in retirement then that means you've got this bigger amount that you got to take from investments which could alter your retirement plans i helped a woman recently who's not a client but she was looking at her plan and she wanted some help and she had about 20k of credit card debt she also had over a million dollars and her regular expenses adding on this 20k of a lump sum expense to her plan it really made quite an impact and once we looked at that together it gave her the motivation to work a little bit extra and extra hard to get this debt payment down to zero or get the credit card debt down to zero before retiring because she'd have a greater peace of mind and it would just increase her confidence as she was going into retirement that peace of mind it's key right i'm sure you're feeling the same way i actually want to share a little bit more about how to achieve this before you retire and during retirement and i share that at the end of this video so stay tuned the next ones are expenses that you can either pay early or at least you want to earmark these in your retirement plan and i'll show you what i mean when i say earmark that just means setting aside funds for specific purposes and either not including those funds in your retirement plan or including them but at least showing the specifics within the plan and i'll show you some images coming up of a retirement plan and how to do this number one thing to earmark is any big travel expenses that you're looking forward to that first year of retirement or really the first few years of retirement a lot of people kick off retirement and they'll really have a big special trip that they've always wanted to take or a place that they've always wanted to go to and lots of times that vacation it's going to cost more than the typical vacation that you might take on a regular year it's really that cap to uh ending work and then really doing a bigger than normal trip some clients choose to take one of those european uh river cruises that are pretty popular and they can cost 10 to 20k or more and knowing that this is a bigger than normal expense or a lump sum expense coming soon into retirement you can either pay that ahead of time like actually many of the cruise places make you do or you can at least earmark it in the plan and make sure that it all works with everything and i'll throw it in there as an example coming up soon here's an example of a retirement plan that's based on annual expenses going up each year three percent regular inflation rate and then over on the left side we can add some expenses that are bigger and irregular you know not the regular every year expenses but things we can earmark so that we can see the impact of on the plan before actually spending the money and doing it this way we can add some peace of mind to your retirement plan and your confidence as you're spending money and so you can just feel that it's a good decision and feel good about that vacation or whatever it might be a few other bigger than normal one-time expenses we've seen are related to your adult kids if you have them whether it's final college expenses or maybe a wedding that you want to help out with or future gifts maybe towards a home purchase or something like that for those you're not really able to pay those before you retire because we don't know when they're going to happen so earmarking them is the next best step and setting funds aside to make sure that these potential expenses that you might have in the future are ready and available ready to deploy when needed one mistake that we've seen some retirees make getting close to retirement is not factoring in these one-time expenses and then getting caught a little off guard when it's time to pay for them especially if we're in a market like we are now now you might be thinking one big expense that i did not mention and before i share that one if you enjoyed watching this video so far and you found it helpful please click the like button so this can hopefully spread to other people who are like you and might find it helpful as well so that one big expense that you might be thinking of that i didn't mention yet is paying off your whole mortgage before you retire and this is a big one for many people as you've heard before behind every financial decision there's also an emotional one as well and many people they feel very strongly or maybe adamant on on being debt-free in retirement and that's a really good feeling for for many people for others depending on their financial decision it actually a mortgage could actually make sense in retirement some people see it as a fixed expense which doesn't go up with inflation it actually gets cheaper as everything else increases with inflation and as one dollar can buy less and less over time which is basically what what inflation is it may be at really attractive interest rates as well and some people want to have a little bit more flexibility in their retirement accounts by keeping some funds available in their non-retirement accounts versus using that money to pay off the mortgage the more important thing to to think about when deciding whether this makes sense whether to pay it off or not is try to measure first just the emotional feeling or comfort with debt you know yourself and then also your spouse if you're married and then step two is map out both scenarios what does it look like that plan that we're just looking at over here what does it look like if you pay off debt early or don't pay off the mortgage at all look at the difference see which one's okay lots of times it comes down to the strength of the emotional feeling around debt for one person in the relationship or if it's just you then it's just whatever you prefer when we're thinking about paying off expenses or earmarking things in retirement get help from a financial professional a cfp could be a great place to start but i'd like to hear from you what did i not mention as we're thinking about these different expenses in retirement i'd love to hear your thoughts about these expenses and especially the thoughts on mortgage having a mortgage in retirement and i want to share another video about how increasing peace of mind and making sure that you get both parts needed for a successful retirement the sad thing is that in this industry the financial industry most of the time they focus on one thing but here's a video to watch that'll help you think about and prepare for both sides of retirement so hopefully i'll see you there and if you haven't already subscribe and then i'll see you in future videos take care you

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Pay This Off Before You Retire – Retirement Planning Tips

in this video we'll look at what expenses you should think about getting rid of before retiring and a few mistakes that retirees make when it comes to expenses in retirement there's a few things that you may want to say goodbye to before you say goodbye to that wage or that work income we're going to cover this in three parts it's going to look like this first we'll go over needs and wants and then what i'd call highway robbery and then also what to ear mark in retirement we've seen that the retirees that can get rid of these expenses before retiring have a little bit more breathing room and they feel better about their retirement plan because when you're planning for retirement we usually think about really two types of expenses it's the needs which are the essentials the absolute must-haves to just live you know as you think about my maslow's hierarchy of needs those things at the base layer and then there's the wants which are the the nice to have things but then there are other types of expenses that really don't fit into that category of needs or wants those are the things that we need to be done with before retirement and by the way i'm dave zoller and me and my team we run streamline financial it's a wealth management firm focused on retirement planning and we've been helping people personally for 13 years and streamlines been around for 22 years and we created this channel to share what's working with our clients so that you can benefit too so if you're close to retirement be sure to subscribe because i share one new video each week to make your retirement a little bit better i also put some free resources in the description below like my favorite diy retirement planner if you're more of a do-it-yourselfer so let's get into the list and then as you're watching if i leave something out please share it in the comments below i'd love to hear from you and then also i'll try to reply back to depending on how many comments i get so the first two you will probably agree with but you might not be thinking about the other ones and i want to show you ways to prepare and just make sure that your retirement is a little bit smoother by using our retirement planning software the first one which you already know is to pay off high interest debt which i sometimes think of as highway robbery it's when those interest rates are just so high and they're charging people it just seems unfair right that high interest debt i'm referring to is usually credit card debt and sometimes it's student loan debt and you'd be surprised at the number of people who in their first year of retirement they still have a large monthly payment towards credit card payments or student loan debt and this should be the number one thing that we should focus on to really reduce before we say goodbye to that job income or that wage because if you retire with credit card debt and then you get serious about paying it off in retirement then that means you've got this bigger amount that you got to take from investments which could alter your retirement plans i helped a woman recently who's not a client but she was looking at her plan and she wanted some help and she had about 20k of credit card debt she also had over a million dollars and her regular expenses adding on this 20k of a lump sum expense to her plan it really made quite an impact and once we looked at that together it gave her the motivation to work a little bit extra and extra hard to get this debt payment down to zero or get the credit card debt down to zero before retiring because she'd have a greater peace of mind and it would just increase her confidence as she was going into retirement that peace of mind it's key right i'm sure you're feeling the same way i actually want to share a little bit more about how to achieve this before you retire and during retirement and i share that at the end of this video so stay tuned the next ones are expenses that you can either pay early or at least you want to earmark these in your retirement plan and i'll show you what i mean when i say earmark that just means setting aside funds for specific purposes and either not including those funds in your retirement plan or including them but at least showing the specifics within the plan and i'll show you some images coming up of a retirement plan and how to do this number one thing to earmark is any big travel expenses that you're looking forward to that first year of retirement or really the first few years of retirement a lot of people kick off retirement and they'll really have a big special trip that they've always wanted to take or a place that they've always wanted to go to and lots of times that vacation it's going to cost more than the typical vacation that you might take on a regular year it's really that cap to uh ending work and then really doing a bigger than normal trip some clients choose to take one of those european uh river cruises that are pretty popular and they can cost 10 to 20k or more and knowing that this is a bigger than normal expense or a lump sum expense coming soon into retirement you can either pay that ahead of time like actually many of the cruise places make you do or you can at least earmark it in the plan and make sure that it all works with everything and i'll throw it in there as an example coming up soon here's an example of a retirement plan that's based on annual expenses going up each year three percent regular inflation rate and then over on the left side we can add some expenses that are bigger and irregular you know not the regular every year expenses but things we can earmark so that we can see the impact of on the plan before actually spending the money and doing it this way we can add some peace of mind to your retirement plan and your confidence as you're spending money and so you can just feel that it's a good decision and feel good about that vacation or whatever it might be a few other bigger than normal one-time expenses we've seen are related to your adult kids if you have them whether it's final college expenses or maybe a wedding that you want to help out with or future gifts maybe towards a home purchase or something like that for those you're not really able to pay those before you retire because we don't know when they're going to happen so earmarking them is the next best step and setting funds aside to make sure that these potential expenses that you might have in the future are ready and available ready to deploy when needed one mistake that we've seen some retirees make getting close to retirement is not factoring in these one-time expenses and then getting caught a little off guard when it's time to pay for them especially if we're in a market like we are now now you might be thinking one big expense that i did not mention and before i share that one if you enjoyed watching this video so far and you found it helpful please click the like button so this can hopefully spread to other people who are like you and might find it helpful as well so that one big expense that you might be thinking of that i didn't mention yet is paying off your whole mortgage before you retire and this is a big one for many people as you've heard before behind every financial decision there's also an emotional one as well and many people they feel very strongly or maybe adamant on on being debt-free in retirement and that's a really good feeling for for many people for others depending on their financial decision it actually a mortgage could actually make sense in retirement some people see it as a fixed expense which doesn't go up with inflation it actually gets cheaper as everything else increases with inflation and as one dollar can buy less and less over time which is basically what what inflation is it may be at really attractive interest rates as well and some people want to have a little bit more flexibility in their retirement accounts by keeping some funds available in their non-retirement accounts versus using that money to pay off the mortgage the more important thing to to think about when deciding whether this makes sense whether to pay it off or not is try to measure first just the emotional feeling or comfort with debt you know yourself and then also your spouse if you're married and then step two is map out both scenarios what does it look like that plan that we're just looking at over here what does it look like if you pay off debt early or don't pay off the mortgage at all look at the difference see which one's okay lots of times it comes down to the strength of the emotional feeling around debt for one person in the relationship or if it's just you then it's just whatever you prefer when we're thinking about paying off expenses or earmarking things in retirement get help from a financial professional a cfp could be a great place to start but i'd like to hear from you what did i not mention as we're thinking about these different expenses in retirement i'd love to hear your thoughts about these expenses and especially the thoughts on mortgage having a mortgage in retirement and i want to share another video about how increasing peace of mind and making sure that you get both parts needed for a successful retirement the sad thing is that in this industry the financial industry most of the time they focus on one thing but here's a video to watch that'll help you think about and prepare for both sides of retirement so hopefully i'll see you there and if you haven't already subscribe and then i'll see you in future videos take care you

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Retirement Planning Home

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Pay This Off Before You Retire – Retirement Planning Tips

in this video we'll look at what expenses you should think about getting rid of before retiring and a few mistakes that retirees make when it comes to expenses in retirement there's a few things that you may want to say goodbye to before you say goodbye to that wage or that work income we're going to cover this in three parts it's going to look like this first we'll go over needs and wants and then what i'd call highway robbery and then also what to ear mark in retirement we've seen that the retirees that can get rid of these expenses before retiring have a little bit more breathing room and they feel better about their retirement plan because when you're planning for retirement we usually think about really two types of expenses it's the needs which are the essentials the absolute must-haves to just live you know as you think about my maslow's hierarchy of needs those things at the base layer and then there's the wants which are the the nice to have things but then there are other types of expenses that really don't fit into that category of needs or wants those are the things that we need to be done with before retirement and by the way i'm dave zoller and me and my team we run streamline financial it's a wealth management firm focused on retirement planning and we've been helping people personally for 13 years and streamlines been around for 22 years and we created this channel to share what's working with our clients so that you can benefit too so if you're close to retirement be sure to subscribe because i share one new video each week to make your retirement a little bit better i also put some free resources in the description below like my favorite diy retirement planner if you're more of a do-it-yourselfer so let's get into the list and then as you're watching if i leave something out please share it in the comments below i'd love to hear from you and then also i'll try to reply back to depending on how many comments i get so the first two you will probably agree with but you might not be thinking about the other ones and i want to show you ways to prepare and just make sure that your retirement is a little bit smoother by using our retirement planning software the first one which you already know is to pay off high interest debt which i sometimes think of as highway robbery it's when those interest rates are just so high and they're charging people it just seems unfair right that high interest debt i'm referring to is usually credit card debt and sometimes it's student loan debt and you'd be surprised at the number of people who in their first year of retirement they still have a large monthly payment towards credit card payments or student loan debt and this should be the number one thing that we should focus on to really reduce before we say goodbye to that job income or that wage because if you retire with credit card debt and then you get serious about paying it off in retirement then that means you've got this bigger amount that you got to take from investments which could alter your retirement plans i helped a woman recently who's not a client but she was looking at her plan and she wanted some help and she had about 20k of credit card debt she also had over a million dollars and her regular expenses adding on this 20k of a lump sum expense to her plan it really made quite an impact and once we looked at that together it gave her the motivation to work a little bit extra and extra hard to get this debt payment down to zero or get the credit card debt down to zero before retiring because she'd have a greater peace of mind and it would just increase her confidence as she was going into retirement that peace of mind it's key right i'm sure you're feeling the same way i actually want to share a little bit more about how to achieve this before you retire and during retirement and i share that at the end of this video so stay tuned the next ones are expenses that you can either pay early or at least you want to earmark these in your retirement plan and i'll show you what i mean when i say earmark that just means setting aside funds for specific purposes and either not including those funds in your retirement plan or including them but at least showing the specifics within the plan and i'll show you some images coming up of a retirement plan and how to do this number one thing to earmark is any big travel expenses that you're looking forward to that first year of retirement or really the first few years of retirement a lot of people kick off retirement and they'll really have a big special trip that they've always wanted to take or a place that they've always wanted to go to and lots of times that vacation it's going to cost more than the typical vacation that you might take on a regular year it's really that cap to uh ending work and then really doing a bigger than normal trip some clients choose to take one of those european uh river cruises that are pretty popular and they can cost 10 to 20k or more and knowing that this is a bigger than normal expense or a lump sum expense coming soon into retirement you can either pay that ahead of time like actually many of the cruise places make you do or you can at least earmark it in the plan and make sure that it all works with everything and i'll throw it in there as an example coming up soon here's an example of a retirement plan that's based on annual expenses going up each year three percent regular inflation rate and then over on the left side we can add some expenses that are bigger and irregular you know not the regular every year expenses but things we can earmark so that we can see the impact of on the plan before actually spending the money and doing it this way we can add some peace of mind to your retirement plan and your confidence as you're spending money and so you can just feel that it's a good decision and feel good about that vacation or whatever it might be a few other bigger than normal one-time expenses we've seen are related to your adult kids if you have them whether it's final college expenses or maybe a wedding that you want to help out with or future gifts maybe towards a home purchase or something like that for those you're not really able to pay those before you retire because we don't know when they're going to happen so earmarking them is the next best step and setting funds aside to make sure that these potential expenses that you might have in the future are ready and available ready to deploy when needed one mistake that we've seen some retirees make getting close to retirement is not factoring in these one-time expenses and then getting caught a little off guard when it's time to pay for them especially if we're in a market like we are now now you might be thinking one big expense that i did not mention and before i share that one if you enjoyed watching this video so far and you found it helpful please click the like button so this can hopefully spread to other people who are like you and might find it helpful as well so that one big expense that you might be thinking of that i didn't mention yet is paying off your whole mortgage before you retire and this is a big one for many people as you've heard before behind every financial decision there's also an emotional one as well and many people they feel very strongly or maybe adamant on on being debt-free in retirement and that's a really good feeling for for many people for others depending on their financial decision it actually a mortgage could actually make sense in retirement some people see it as a fixed expense which doesn't go up with inflation it actually gets cheaper as everything else increases with inflation and as one dollar can buy less and less over time which is basically what what inflation is it may be at really attractive interest rates as well and some people want to have a little bit more flexibility in their retirement accounts by keeping some funds available in their non-retirement accounts versus using that money to pay off the mortgage the more important thing to to think about when deciding whether this makes sense whether to pay it off or not is try to measure first just the emotional feeling or comfort with debt you know yourself and then also your spouse if you're married and then step two is map out both scenarios what does it look like that plan that we're just looking at over here what does it look like if you pay off debt early or don't pay off the mortgage at all look at the difference see which one's okay lots of times it comes down to the strength of the emotional feeling around debt for one person in the relationship or if it's just you then it's just whatever you prefer when we're thinking about paying off expenses or earmarking things in retirement get help from a financial professional a cfp could be a great place to start but i'd like to hear from you what did i not mention as we're thinking about these different expenses in retirement i'd love to hear your thoughts about these expenses and especially the thoughts on mortgage having a mortgage in retirement and i want to share another video about how increasing peace of mind and making sure that you get both parts needed for a successful retirement the sad thing is that in this industry the financial industry most of the time they focus on one thing but here's a video to watch that'll help you think about and prepare for both sides of retirement so hopefully i'll see you there and if you haven't already subscribe and then i'll see you in future videos take care you

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Retirement: I’m 60 Years Old with $900K in Savings. Can I Retire Now? What is My Risk Capacity?

so you're 60 years old with nine hundred thousand dollars saved and the question is can you retire in today's video we're going to look at a few different decisions that could be made the impact those decisions have on the plan with the overall goal of not running out of money hi I'm Troy sharp CEO of Oak Harvest Financial Group a certified financial planner professional host of the retirement income show and a certified tax specialist in today's case study we're going to look at a situation that's not too dissimilar from what we normally encounter in our day-to-day operations here at Oak Harvest Financial Group so we have James who's 60 years old he comes in and he says Troy I want to spend about seventy thousand dollars and I'm just tired of working I want to to this year to be my last year so I want to spend seventy thousand dollars I think I'm going to live to about 90 years old pretty good health and I want this fifty thousand dollars to increase with inflation over the course of my retirement but for the first 10 years and what I hear you talk about in this go go spending phase I want to spend an additional 20 000 per year bringing that first 10 years of spending up to 70 000 per year then that go go spending goes away and then we have the inflation adjusted 50 000 to plan for from age 70 to age 90.

Hey just a brief Interruption here to ask you to subscribe to the channel now what that does for you is that puts us Oak Harvest Financial Group and all the content we produce in your little TV Guide so you have a much easier way to come back and find it later share this video with a friend or family member and also comment down below I love to respond to the comments now if you have any questions about your particular situation or you'd like to consider becoming a client of Oak Harvest feel free to reach out to us there's a link in the description below but you can always reach out to us and give us a call and have a conversation to see if we might be a good fit for each other James tells us that since he wants to retire as soon as possible he he thinks it makes sense to take Social Security the first time available so claiming at 62 a little more than two thousand dollars a month at twenty five thousand dollars per year he also has that nine hundred thousand dollars broken out to four 401K money of 700 Grand then 200 000 in a taxable account or what we call non-qualified outside of the retirement account very important to point out here that the tax characteristic of these two accounts and the Investments inside them and the interest and dividends and the withdrawals from them are taxed differently so that's part of an overall tax plan now James also has a home that's completely paid for and worth six hundred thousand dollars but he's told me that I don't want to use this to fund any of my retirement goals I've lived in this home for a long time I want to stay in the home but we know from a planning perspective that we do have that in our back pocket if it's needed down the road so James's total net worth here is about 1.5 million looking at the paid off home of six hundred thousand the 700 Grand inside the 401K and the 200 000 of non-qualified or taxable account assets now as part of the process to understand where someone is and where they're trying to get to we have to understand how is the portfolio currently allocated so James tells us that Troy I know I've wanted to retire so I've been investing aggressively and trying to get ahead of the game but here we are in 2022 and the markets have pulled back some so that double-edged sword is starting to kind of rear its rear its head but we see James's 93 stock so one of the questions that we have from an internal planning perspective is if we keep this same level of risk while we retire and start taking income out of the portfolio what does that do for what we call the risk capacity or the portfolio's ability to take on risk while Distributing income in the retirement phase so we have to look at the guard rails and guard rails are essentially a statistical calculation of probabilities of the portfolio returning this much on the high side and a good year and this much on the downside in a bad year if these guard rails are too far apart and we're taking in income out if we run into a bad couple of years that bump up against that bottom guardrail but we significantly increase the risk of running out of money so part of the analysis of the planning is is this an appropriate guard rail for this type of portfolio given the desired income level so with everything we've looked at so far the question is if James continues doing what he's currently doing and retires with the desired spending level the assets that he's accumulated living until age 90 what is the probability that he has success well it comes in at about 61 so that's probably not a good retirement number it's something we want to see if we can work to improve so I'm going to pull up the what if analysis here and start to look at some of these different decisions that we could make and see if we can get this probability to increase okay so now we have the what if analysis where we have two different columns up here on the board right now they're identical we're going to keep this one the same as the base case everything that we just went through but now we're going to start to change some of these variables to see what the impact those decisions have on the overall retirement plan and this is much more of an art at this stage than it is a science because we want to start to explore different scenarios and then see what is most comfortable for you once you understand the impact of these different decisions you can take some time to kind of way think about them weigh the the pros and cons and now we're starting to work together to craft you a retirement plan that gives us increased probabilities of success but also something that you feel very very comfortable with so the first couple of options we have which are the most simple and usually have the biggest impact on the plan is that we can either work longer or spend less so James says no I don't want to spend less I have a specific plan I want to get my RV I want to travel the country I want to play some golf I've done my budget I need to spend that 70 000 for the first 10 years so the first thing we'll look at is the impact of working another couple of years so I've changed the age here to 63 as far as Retirement the only variable we're going to change at this time I don't want to change too many variables at once I want to see the impact of different decisions how they impact the overall plan okay so that gives us a bit of an increase but the next thing I want to look at here is social security so Social Security is a very valuable source of guaranteed lifetime income first it's an increasing stream of income it increases with inflation but two no matter what happens with the stock market that income is always going to be coming in so instead of taking the 62 and having a significant reduction in the lifetime income that we receive because I don't want to change spending we still have the 50 and 20 in here I want to change the Social Security from taking it a 62 to taking it at full retirement age okay so changing the Social Security election day gets us up to 76 we're definitely moving in the right direction here after a conversation with James and he realizing that you know what I do feel really secure with that increased social security income because if the market doesn't cooperate I know I'm still going to have that much higher income later in life so that would lead us down the road to say okay let's look at adding more guaranteed lifetime income if we can get your Baseline income to cover a majority of your spending needs then we don't need the market to perform necessarily as well later in life so now we want to look at the impact of adding more guaranteed income to the plan which has the effect of providing more security later in life because if the markets don't cooperate we know we have a certain level of income being deposited every single month no matter how long we live so if you go to our website here it's Oak harvestfinancialgroup.com com we have up top an income writer quote where this is constantly searching for the highest amounts of guaranteed lifetime income that are available in the marketplace simply input the variables here so in Texas age 60 Ira money income starts we're going to start looking at seven years here and I know the dollar amount I would want to put in 300 000.

The good news here is you can input any of these different variables we don't ask for your information so it's a calculator tool that you can play with on your own Single Life payout and we get quote okay so here's the output screen we have all of these different companies over here when you see the same company twice it's because that company offers multiple different products with the same income Rider so an income writer is just an addendum or an attachment to a contract that guarantees no matter what the stock market does a certain amount of Lifetime income based on the specifications you input so about thirty three thousand dollars here so that's about 11 percent of the initial deposit with that income starting in year seven this is why we call it a deferred income annuity because it gets a guaranteed growth to calculate a guaranteed lifetime income that you then would incorporate into your plan so in this what-if analysis we come down here we I've already inputted so three hundred thousand dollars and then we just calculate these scenarios okay now we're up to 87 percent here so now things are starting to look a little bit better let's make a couple of different adjustments here because remember when I talked about the guard rails that's too aggressive of a portfolio given the income need especially in the beginning years but now that we've added some deferred income into the plan the portfolio's capacity for risk increases later in life and all that means is because there's so much income coming in the portfolio can withstand a bit more volatility later once Social Security and the Deferred income annuity kick on because you're needing to take less from the portfolio so let's make a couple more adjustments here so after retirement we don't want to keep the the current investment strategy let's get a little bit more conservative here go from an aggressive plan to something a little bit more conservative and then you know what let's also say now that we're starting to move in the right direction instead of retiring at 63 what happens if we retire at 62.

Get your retired one year earlier than some of these other numbers okay now we're at 83 percent retiring at 62. I want to look at one more variable here because you may want to get a part-time job James may want to be a starter at a golf course maybe he wants to work in the church and he can get ten thousand or fifteen thousand dollars a year maybe just wants to work two three months out of the year so the next thing I want to look at is if we've done all this now what happens if during this first 10 years of retirement he decides he wants to work three months out of the year or maybe just a part-time job and work one or two days a week so instead of needing twenty thousand dollars per year we just need another ten thousand let's say from the portfolio so really that's only earning ten thousand dollars extra in retirement income you could do that driving Uber many different choices there you know what I'm just going to decrease this no I'll leave it there now with James deciding to maybe work part-time here to reduce that spending need in the first 10 years let's see if we can also get them retired at 61.

Okay so now James has decided that working part-time and hey we're talking 10 grand here so this isn't a lot of money now I want to see what happens if we go back to the original goal that James had of retiring as soon as possible at age 61. so we're going to change this back to his original goal 61 calculate all scenarios and now this gets us up to 94 so we started at 61 if where James was originally at whenever he came in if he kept doing whatever he was already doing we got him up to 94 percent here okay I want to take a minute before we finish the final Concept in this video to discuss some of the adjustments we've made so far to get James from 61 to 94 so first and foremost we adjusted the Social Security election strategy secondly we added that deferred income annuity thirdly James has decided to work part-time to generate ten thousand dollars per year in those beginning years to help reduce the burden of taking out an additional twenty thousand dollars of retirement income and then finally we've brought the guardrails in on the Investment Portfolio which helps to eliminate very bad outcomes that could happen with his original 93 allocation to stocks we haven't totally went to bonds or cash we've just brought those guard rails in by reducing our Equity exposure in the beginning years of retirement we can always adjust that later now last thing I want to do is look at what we call the combined details all of these things together in a spreadsheet just so we can see how these different pieces are working together and then look at what we call different Monte Carlo analyzes so now I want to share with you some of the individual trial analysis that we run just like we would for a normal client to help identify not only where the weak spots are in the portfolio but how these different decisions that we're making impact the overall client balance and it's not just looking at what we call an average rate of return it's looking at a thousand different simulations we're going to look at a couple here and the Order of the return so check out the video if you want to understand more about this concept you can click the link up above and the title of the video is how eleven percent average returns could destroy your retirement and that'll really get home that concept of it's not about what you average but it's about the order in which you realize returns over the course of your retirement during the day distribution phase so here we have this individual trial and we're gonna it's the median scenario out of a thousand different scenarios so I just want to go through this fairly quickly with you and based on some of the adjustments to the portfolio we see the investment return column here so all of this I think averaged out to I think it was about four and a half percent gross returns I can go back and double check that in a second but you see it's it's never four four four four four four four four or six six six six this is what it looks like in the real world so James retires essentially the beginning of 2023 we have the Deferred income annuity clicking on here we've changed Social Security to click on here so if we add these two together come heck or high water there will be minimally 74 000 almost 75 000 deposited into his bank account every single year now if we look at the retirement need it's about sixty one thousand dollars plus the discretionary Go-Go spending is about twelve thousand two ninety nine so about seventy three thousand dollars but what this does is because we're getting so much from these two sources it really reduces the need for the portfolio to perform and if we kind of go out go on out through retirement you see Social Security isn't increasing income so later in life now we're up to about 89 almost 90 000 of income and our ninety thousand dollars inflation adjusted retirement income need is covered by the amount of guaranteed lifetime income that we have in the portfolio which then allows our portfolio balances to stabilize because we're not needing it to support our lifestyle later in life so this is just one example here but we see the ending portfolio value even though it spends down a little bit in the beginning years okay it starts to stabilize because the income provided from the decisions that we've made put us in a situation where we don't have to withdraw so much from the portfolio Okay so now I want to look at a different trial and just to confirm here the 500th scenario was an average of 4.6 but you saw the different order of those returns and how we actually got to 4.6 okay so if we slide this up here let's assume it's a pretty bad scenario this is going to let me change it here find a worse return okay so this brings the average down to 3.05 and we still see in bar graph form here that the portfolio value still is stabilized and it's primarily because that change in the Social Security decision and adding the Deferred income annuity it still puts us into that position to where if the market doesn't perform we have enough income from guaranteed sources that we're not dependent on the stock market to provide us income in retirement especially later in life when we typically are more conservative and most people that I've worked with don't have the same stomach at 80 or 82 to stay invested in Big Market pullbacks as they did when they were 52 or 62.

Now what I want to show you is the comparison to what we just looked at in the individual trial analysis to the original plan that came in at 61 percent with all the original inputs so if James just wanted to retire not go see anyone make any adjustments I want to show you what that looks like on the individual trial analysis so remember in this scenario we kept Social Security at 62 no job so the spending stayed at seventy thousand twenty thousand was that go go spending no change to the portfolio so we still have the aggressive portfolio which brings in the possibility of some pretty bad outcomes and no deferred income annuity here to help stabilize the income generation later in life as well as the volatility impact on the portfolio so when we when we look at this so here we go um had James has a 900 000.

You see we have none of the annuity income here Social Security starts out at about 26 000 for him a little more than two thousand a month now look at the investment returns here because it's a more aggressive portfolio the range the guard rails are increased here and then finally the spending we have the fifty thousand plus twenty thousand increasing for inflation with the Go-Go lasting 10 years so in the first 10 years of retirement we see things are going pretty well even at this spending level because we have some pretty good returns in here even though we have a couple bad years but what happens is the income because of inflation the income need increases later in life and we see it really just takes a couple of bad years here minus 21 minus 12 we go from a million to 755 and then it's pretty much all downhill from there in this particular scenario running out of income except for Social Security which is now only up to about forty four thousand dollars per year compared to the other plan with the Deferred Social Security so full retirement age and the Deferred income annuity we were at I wanted to say it was around 85 88 000 um of income not dependent on the stock market here we're only at 45 in the mid 80s so that means we have to take more out of the portfolio so it's more susceptible to bad returns later in retirement now the big takeaway here is this is what a good retirement planner does it's not necessarily about the investment returns it's about determining how much money you should have in the market when you should take Social Security we didn't even get into taxes here additional benefits could be provided through tax planning but what you should do with taxes and identifying those spending goals and those needs in order to get you retired and stay retired and then staying connected to this plan over time that's what a good retirement advisor does it's not about outperforming the market it's about finding a plan that gets you and keeps you retired just a brief reminder here to subscribe to the channel now what that does is that puts us in your TV Guide here on YouTube so it doesn't cost anything but if you subscribe to the channel you can come back to us much more easily down the road make sure to comment down below and also share this video with a friend or family member that you think could benefit from what we're talking about today [Music] foreign

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Why This Investment System Can Help Retirees Worry Less About Their Retirement Plan

I want to share an investment system for retirees to hopefully assist you as you're thinking about and planning for your retirement we're also going to look at how to prepare your retirement for the multiple potential potential economic Seasons that we may be headed into so we want to look at the multiple seasons and then the Easy System that's going to help lower taxes and then lower risk as well now if I haven't met you yet I'm Dave zoller and we help people plan for and Implement these retirement strategies really for a select number of people at streamline Financial that's our retirement planning firm but because we can't help everyone we want to share this with you as well so if you like retirement specific videos about one per week be sure to subscribe so in order to create a proper investment plan in system we want to make sure that we build out the retirement income plan first because without the income plan it's much harder to design the right investment strategy it's kind of like without the income plan it's like you're guessing at well 60 40 portfolio sounds good or you know May maybe this amount in the conservative bucket sounds reasonable you already know and and you feel that as you get close to retirement that goal of just more money isn't the the end-all goal that we should really be aiming for for retirement it's more about sustainability and certainty and then really the certainty of income and possibly less risk than before the last 30 years uh the things that you did to be successful with the financial side are going to look different than the next 20 or 30 years now if you need help defining the the income plan a little bit then look at the DIY retirement course below this video now once you do Define your goals for retirement and then the income needed to achieve those goals then creating the investment system becomes a lot easier and within the investment plan we really know that we can only control three things in all three things we actually want to minimize through this investment system the first thing we can minimize or reduce is how much tax you pay when investing we had a a client who was not a client of streamline Financial but of a tax firm coming to the the CPA firm in March to pick up his tax return and he was completely surprised that he had sixty thousand dollars of extra income on his tax return that he had to pay tax on right away before April 15th and it was due to the capital gains being recognized and other distributions within his investment account and he said but I didn't sell anything and the account didn't even go up that much last year and I got to pay tax on it but he was already in the highest tax bracket paying about close to 37 percent on short-term capital gains and dividends and interest so that was an unpleasant surprise and we see it happen more often than it should but this can really be avoided and here's two ways we can control tax so that we don't have to have that happen and really just control tax and pay less of it is the goal and I'll keep this at a high level but it'll get the the point across number one is the kinds of Investments that you own some are maybe funds or ETFs or individual uh equities or things like that the funds and ETFs they could pass on capital gains and and distributions to you each year without you even doing anything without you selling or or buying but it happens within the fund a lot of times now we would use funds and ETFs that are considered tax efficient so that our clients they can decide when to recognize gains rather than letting the fund company decide now the second way is by using a strategy that's called tlh each year there's many many fluctuations or big fluctuations that happen in an investment account and the strategy that we call tlh that allows our clients that's tax loss harvesting it allows them to sell an investment that may be down for part of the year and then move it into a very similar investment right away so that the investment strategy stays the same and they can actually take a write-off on that loss on their taxes that year now there's some rules around this again we're going high level but it offsets uh you know for that one client who are not a client but who had the big sixty thousand dollars of income he could have been offsetting those capital gains by doing tlh or tax loss harvesting that strategy has really saved hundreds and thousands of of dollars for clients over a period of years so on to the next thing that we can control in our investment plan and that's cost this one's easier but many advisors they don't do it because it ends up paying them less now since we're certified financial planner professionals we do follow the fiduciary standard and we're obligated to do what's best for our clients so tell me this if you had two Investments and they had the exact same strategy the same Returns the same risk and the same tax efficiency would you rather want the one that costs 0.05 percent per year or the one that costs 12 times more at point six percent well I know that answer is obvious and we'd go with a lower cost funds if it was all the same low-cost funds and ETFs that's how we can really help reduce the cost or that's how you can help reduce the cost in your investment plan because every basis point or part of a percentage that's saved in cost it's added to your return each year and this adds up to a lot over time now the last thing that we want to minimize and control is risk and we already talked about the flaws of investing solely based on on risk tolerance and when it comes to risk a lot of people think that term risk tolerance you know how much risk can we on a scale of one to ten where are we on the the risk factor but there's another way to look at risk in your investment strategy and like King Solomon we believe that there's a season for everything or like the if it was the bird song There's a season for everything and we also believe that there's four different seasons in investing and depending on what season we're in some Investments perform better than others and the Four Seasons are pull it up right now it's higher than expected inflation which we might be feeling but there's also a season that can be lower than expected or deflation and then there's higher than expected economic growth or lower than expected economic growth and the goal is reduce the risk in investing by making sure that we're prepared for each and every one of those potential Seasons because there are individual asset classes that tend to do well during each one of those seasons and we don't know nobody knows what's really going to happen you know people would would speculate and say oh it's going to be this or this or whatever might happen but we don't know for sure that's why we want to make sure we just have the asset classes in the right spots so that the income plan doesn't get impacted so the investment system combined with the income system clients don't have to worry about the movements in the market because they know they've got enough to weather any potential season I hope this has been helpful for you so far as you're thinking about your retirement if it was please subscribe or like this video so that hopefully other people can be helped as well and then I'll see you in the next one take care thank you

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Why Some Retirees Succeed and Others Live in Worry – 5 Retirement Truths

I want to share one of the most valuable pieces of retirement advice that I've ever heard if you're thinking about your retirement and you're wondering if you're doing the right thing or think that you should be doing something different or if you're just worried about all the things going on right now whether it's the economy or the markets or the value of your accounts be sure to watch this video because I'm going to share the retirement truths that every retiree goes through and it's these things right here we're going to cover today and every retiree goes through it and it they experience this in retirement so it's going to go over this and then also what to expect in retirement and then how to give yourself the best chances of maintaining your lifestyle in retirement as well now the negative of these retirement truths that we're going to look at is that many of them lead to increased uncertainty or worry about your retirement one of our goals though as we're thinking about it is really the opposite of uncertainty or worry in retirement it really should be more about confidence right the next years really all the way up until you pass away wait these are the the magic ears these could be the best years of your life and I know that because there's an actual study a research study uh proving this so let me pull that up really quick and show you the results and I'll link to it below people were asked to score their life satisfaction from zero to ten where 10 is the best possible life and then zero is the worst possible life and this is really just the average score by age and I thought it was encouraging to see that life satisfaction tends to increase as you can see as we get older and then it tends to Trail off as we get older but really the area the the period of time we want to focus on is that this is the magic time and we know this to be true as well because we've helped hundreds of pre-retirees move into retirement with confidence and excitement and these were the people who were coming to us that were feeling somewhat unsure or not 100 confident with their money plan and our firm streamline Financial has been around for 24 years and we've made it through quite a few bad Market periods with our clients and by the way if I haven't met you yet I'm Dave zoller and I own streamline Financial with Tim and Luke and Sean and if you're working with an advisor now that's mainly focused on investments and investment planning but doesn't talk about these key retirement strategies like the tax efficient withdrawal planning and income planning or just tax reduction overall feel free to reach out to us through the website now we don't always have time but I'll get back to you either way so let's get into this first truth in retirement it will be common to have that thought of maybe I should be be making a change or should I be doing something different it'll be normal to feel this way in retirement especially when you see the news or you're listening to friends talk about their finances there's this feeling or this thought of really making us doubt our current plan which causes some people to make more emotional decisions instead of making smart financial decisions and a good way to avoid this is really to avoid this feeling is by having an understanding of your plan which really leads to more confidence with what you're doing and having a plan for both the good times and also the bad Mark of times so that you know that you're prepared for either one of those and I'll give you some ways to achieve this coming up in this video now on to the second thing that comes up in retirement that we just have to be prepared for is we need to expect bear markets right you've most likely lived through a lot of them already and really in retirement though they feel a little bit different usually worse but because of the frequency creating a plan with bear markets in mind and really big Corrections built into the plan is a smart thing to do that way you don't have to worry when they eventually come now if you're not sure how to model out these various what-if scenarios or bad Market scenarios for your plan then you may want to talk to a cfp or check out my favorite retirement income planner below this video you should see a link to it it's one of the best consumer facing planners that I've seen and it doesn't cost thousands of dollars like the ones that we use for our clients the next thing to bring up is for pre-retirees who are close to stopping their wage especially if that's during bad markets they may think should I work a little bit longer maybe just one more year to kind of make it through this this difficult period we actually had a client call us up about five months ago and uh no she was five months into retirement and she said something like it seems like so much bad news is out there and what's going on with the markets I'm wondering if I it would have been better if I should have just kept working so we reviewed her plan and because we built in to her plan this expectation of bad markets everything looked great and and really the only reason to keep working would be if she really enjoyed this sort of work that she was doing and it brought her some some purpose but she didn't so it was great it was great confirmation that she was still on the right track so if this sounds like you take a look at another video I recorded I'm gonna either link on this screen or it'll be below and it gives a few real examples of what working an extra year might look like in a financial plan the next thing to know is that no one really knows what's going to happen next it seems like everybody has a prediction on TV or YouTube or at the dinner table with family or with friends and no one really knows what is definitely going to happen we know this uh in a logical way because you know there's that saying if you put 10 economists in the room together and they come up they need to come up with a conclusion they'll come up with 12 of different answers when they walk out knowing that it's important to prepare your investment plan for that four economic Seasons that we may go through in the future since we don't know which one we're going to go through next so just as as an example you've seen it before the four economic seasons are higher than expected economic growth or lower than expected economic growth and then higher than expected inflation or lower than expected inflation and there's asset classes that can do well in each one of those now again we don't know which way we're headed but having asset classes and each one of those potential Seasons that could be beneficial now that's just my opinion and really it's for all of this talk to your own Financial professionals before doing anything like this now on to the next one which really has more to do with human psychology than investment strategy and then after that I'll share the the really the most helpful piece of advice that I've heard related to retirement planning but if you'd like this so far please click on the the like button and and maybe this video can help somebody else going through the same things that that you're looking forward to so the next truth is in retirement we may have a tendency to compare ourselves to others the grass is always greener on the other side of the fence really throughout life that's we've got that tendency to compare it to others but it can harm us in retirement too if we do a video on this channel that mentions a dollar amount as an example we don't want that to really make you feel better or feel worse about your current situation because you know we help high net worth families at streamline Financial we sometimes mention big numbers but we don't want it to be about the numbers we really want to communicate just the principles and the strategies that can can really be applied to to anybody's finances and there's always going to be people with more than us and then there's always going to be people with less than us and the one who wins is the one who's content and at peace most at peace with their current situation you know that saying if I want to be able to practice being content with a little and I want to be able to practice being content with a lot and and you know healthy competition that's okay but comparing ourselves to someone else because uh you know if it causes us a feel of lack or less than that can hurt our retirement plans because that leads really back to that first point that we talked about in uh in this list of feeling like we should be doing something different for example if we see a guy on the internet and he's investing a certain way or he's deciding he's changing up his entire strategy um because of what's happening with the economy then that may cause us to feel like we should be doing something different and then start to increase the emotional level of uh of our decision making instead of staying to strictly logical or financial levels but again it's a normal feeling to feel that worry or fear or anxiety um with what's happening during during current periods but one of the most helpful pieces of advice that I've heard that we can apply to retirement planning is really the difference between those two words fear and anxiety knowing the difference between those two is actually very very helpful as we're planning retirement and talking about money that is if we want to feel better about what we're doing right now when we think about fear and anxiety we might think of them as being the same thing but actually they're completely different things and let me just pull up these two definitions if I can really quickly fear is a caution over a real and present danger and then anxiety is a worry over an imagined future danger now fear if we've got something right in front of us then it's obviously a very helpful tool for us as humans anxiety though is not always a helpful tool as as we're trying to process things partly because these anxieties there's nothing we can do to control or influence them you may have seen this drawing from Carl Richards before about things that matter and then things I can control here's a place to focus and then another way to look at it is we actually sent this to clients not too long ago on a video of what you can't control and what you can control so we can't control the markets and inflation and what they're doing with interest rates or what's happening in the news or the world or tax laws or the elections but a lot of these things actually do relate to things that we can control for instance you know markets are inflation or interest rates your portfolio allocation you can control that you can control when to pay taxes when it's related to in investing you know as we're talking about Roth conversions or the the costs the tax cost tax drag on some of the portfolio and not to get too nerdy about these things but two of the biggest things that we've seen is this idea of not controlling the news but what we can control is news consumption we've seen a big shift with uh some people who instead of someone who wants to consume the news they switch from TV news to reading news where you have a little bit more control of what's coming at you versus TV is just the next thing is coming at you if you know what I mean I don't know if that's if I if I'm explaining that the right way but back to the this video all the things that we mentioned before earlier here um a lot of these can be anxiety-inducing things as well right the severity of a bear Market or not being able to predict what's going to happen next in the world or comparing ourselves and doubting our plan or thinking that we don't have as much as as we wish we had when it comes to to money or the you know what if this happens and what if this happens how is that going to impact my plan and that can lead that sort of thinking can lead to paralysis and really no action being taken but what if you had a plan that was built in to show those different what-if scenarios so instead of the unknown future danger you're able to get more concrete scenarios in the plan as a result that's what I would recommend once you get get it out in the open then it becomes a lot less scary we both know that so either find a great certified financial planner who can show you that and show you the what-if scenarios or check out the the DIY planner or a different planner that helps you put in those what-if scenarios as well so it becomes less scary so don't forget anxiety is it can be the thief of Dreams it takes you away from enjoying the the present moment and it stops you from even taking the right action to make things better in the future because it really just makes you only focused on on the negative as you're you're moving through life that video that I mentioned earlier is called why delaying retirement might not be a good idea if you're pre-retirement and you're thinking you want to work a little bit longer because of what's going on take a look at that one coming up next or below and then I'll see you in the next video take care foreign [Music]

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