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Things We Wished We Knew Before Retirement

Well it's great to be with you all again it's 
another video day for us – It is – So things that   we wish we knew before we retired almost 
sounds like a country music song there Tina   – And I guess you must be feeling lucky 
today Norm – Oh yeah got my lucky shirt   on so because we're filming been to 
Costco – Got the great deals haven't we   – We have so one of the things that we wish we knew 
before we retired was how free it is how stress   free no longer having to get up and go through the 
morning ritual of preparing yourself to go to work   and being accountable to somebody else all 
day long it's wonderful to be accountable to   your own self and your partner that's it 
you're your own person and it's such a freeing   feeling and we saw that with Tina when she gave 
up work the amount of stress we hadn't realized   until a few years after retirement just how 
different she was she'd lost all that stress of   meeting quotas and all that good stuff – And I think 
I'll just add Norm that when you're actually doing   the job you actually don't think it is stressful 
you don't think you are under all this   stress until you stop it do something else and 
you think wow this is a lot better we like this   it's great so just being accountable to ourselves 
we love it don't we – It is totally life changing   – One thing that we do think is very important 
before you retire is you do need to have a   discussion with your partner as to what it is 
that the ideas that you're both thinking you   have when you're going to retire you do need to 
have some goals about, do you want to travel do   you want to garden or do hobbies do you want 
to stay home you really do need to have that   conversation to make sure you're both on the 
same page – I think it is it is important and   we hear a lot from some comments especially 
married women who are saying that their husband   their frightened the husband will get under their feet 
because he'll be hanging around all the time in   retirement but that really isn't the case – Not 
for us is it – We've been secure as a couple for   the longest time and retirement hasn't changed 
how we feel about each other and about what   our expectations of each other is it's not as if 
we've all of a sudden being locked up together in   retirement (no) so it is important to figure out 
what you both want out of retirement and to have   that discussion a few years before you actually 
do retire (yeah) one thing to bear in mind is   the first few years of your retirement you'll 
be your most healthy so just use that health and   strength that you do have in the early years 
to achieve some of the goals that you want   – Yeah and if you want to be traveling do it while 
you've got that – Don't think about traveling if   that's on your list just do it right away – Yeah 
absolutely and that's what we've done isn't   it when we retired we just traveled everywhere 
didn't we it was great – About two years before we   retired we had an inspector come to the house 
for I don't even remember what it was but it was   some form of home inspection that we had to and 
so we got chatting with him because he was a few   years older than us but not that much and he told 
us that he had a house very similar to ours that   he had sold and now he was living an apartment 
and he went through the whole process of them   and how they moved to the apartment and how 
it was such an improvement on their life   and it was something we'd never ever considered 
– This was big news to us wasn't it we never even   thought about renting an apartment – We had been 
homeowners since we were 19 years old so to rent   we had that preconceived idea that it was throwing 
money away but the more that we looked into it so   after he left the next couple of days we spent 
many hours thinking about this we did a budget   of how much it cost to keep our mortgage free 
home – Yeah crunched all the numbers – And what the   rent would be and if we had sold the house and it 
made more and more sense to us to sell the house   to downsize into an apartment bank the money 
from the house live off that as an investment and   that's what we did – And that's what we did didn't 
we – But had that guy not come to our house we might   never have come up with that idea – No because 
originally we had thought that we would just   buy a smaller house didn't we – That's right yeah 
– So part of our decision when we had actually now   decided that we were going to rent and we realized 
that would take care of we wouldn't have all this   maintenance and stuff like that to do we decided 
after we started looking at apartments that if   we moved to a cheaper area could we benefit by 
getting the same as what we wanted in an apartment   but would it cost us less money so the more 
we looked into it we did have a family member   who lived in a cheaper place so we looked 
at the equivalent of renting an apartment   in this new place and it was so much cheaper 
wasn't it Norm – Because we initially thought   we would just sell our house and stay in 
the same area so we started shopping for   apartments to find out how much they cost and the 
availability and we were pretty surprised that   at the expense of them but we were prepared 
to pay that (yeah) and then we came to a what   you would call it a small town that's cheaper 
(yeah) we came to visit a family member here and so   we started looking around at the apartments here 
and they were substantially cheaper about $800   a month cheaper than where we were initially going 
to – Yeah and not only that Norm there was a lot of   extras with it wasn't that we got there was 
underground parking and what else a swimming pool   – And laundry facilities in the apartment – And that 
was one thing the gentleman had told us he didn't   have on-suite laundry he had it in a laundry room 
so we wanted that – But coming to the cheaper town   it wasn't just the rents that were 
cheaper everything was cheaper   the Tina's hairdresser as we've 
said in the past was cheaper it just permeated everything so our budget became 
so attainable (yeah) by moving – That gave us a lot   more money to be able to travel didn't it because 
we thought if we can save money on a daily basis   and it worked perfect didn't it – It did it was 
great, take a look at that if you do have family   that live in an area that might be cheaper or 
just consider going not knowing anybody – No it's   like a new adventure isn't it a new chapter in 
your life because we've made friends here and   they don't have any family just here but they've 
made it a new place for them haven't they – A lot   of people have moved out of the big cities to a 
small town because it's it's far more conducive to   retirement (yes) and friendlier another 
thing that you really need to consider   is where your friends are going to come from 
in retirement because once you leave work   those friendships tend to wither away because 
the only common bond you have was your job   your workplace so we've never 
really had lasting friendships from   work colleagues they've always been outside 
of there so it's it's critically important   to continue looking for friendships in retirement 
and being outgoing and prepared to speak to people   Tina when we moved to this apartment building 
they did have a social room and they did a coffee   morning and so she would go down there and we 
found out so much information about the town and   businesses to use – It was great wasn't it – It was – It 
was kind of my mission wasn't it to find out   new information and to try and make new friends 
which we did and we made some fabulous friendships   – Well in particular there was one couple that Tina 
made struck up a friendship with and they in turn   have introduced us to another couple yeah and then 
they in turn have introduced us to another couple   so that's how it goes – Yeah so now we've got 
a group of really close nice friends that we   socialize with don't we – And the thing that we have 
in common isn't an employer it's being retired   – It is isn't it – It really is so don't be afraid 
of striking out to a new city a new town   because it's relatively easy to make friendships 
– Yeah you just have to push yourself out there   a little don't you and be confident to going to 
things and it's very exciting isn't it so we hope   that everybody is staying safe – And keeping 
well – Until the next time bye bye, bye bye

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When can I retire? | How much Retirement Corpus is enough?

Hello friends welcome to
yadnya investment academy. Today is friday. So today we will talk about
a financial planning topic. Today's topic is Related to retirement planning A very common question of you all that come Obviously this all knows. Retirement is a very important goal. If we talk about financial goals. Mostly it should be. Mostly when i do financial planning So many persons financial
planning i have done personally Then in that comes. Retirement is a very important goal. In which we need a lot of money Nowadays early retirement is occurring. FIRE environment talks are occurring. Financial free retire early In such things When retirement comes in goal One important thing comes How much money do I need? Tell me this much money is enough. Then I can retire. That is a normal question. For this we have already
developed an interesting calculator but that was before pay wall. Now we have removed that from pay wall because it is very useful calculator. So a retirement calculator we have made. In that with so many
permutations combinations We can get an idea This much retire corps I need.

If I reach here then I have done well. I am at least financially free. Now I have to retire. We have to work further or not. Then it is my decision. If above that. Now I am just sharing my screen. Now you will see here You will go on investyadnya website There is a section named
tracker and calculator. In this there is a retirement calculator. Open this Now here we have to fill information. Suppose i am putting age of 30. You have to retire suppose on 60. Suppose we took an
example i have to retire on 60. Life expectancy we mostly suggest We should keep 90, 95, 100. With a conservative estimate If you keep 100 then it is very
good conservative estimate.

If you want to take optimistic If you took practical then it should be 90. Suppose i am putting here 95. Fourth information is our Current annual expense When we do retirement calculation Obvious we took assumptions. One assumption is this the
expense i am doing today Suppose when i retire Then also my expenses should be like this. Means my lifestyle of now remain maintained Neither i increase nor decrease. Suppose I am spending 50k per month today. The expenses that are occurring. After retirement I will do the same expenses. After retirement expenses can reduce. It can be your house if
you are living now on rent. It can be so much rental expense. That can reduce. Now your children's expenses are so much. They will reduce at that time. Sometimes after retirement
expenses increase. Like vacation expenses mostly increases. Sometimes medical expenses increase. Some expenses have increased. Mostly as an advisor If we took a general advice then we say.

Keep the same expenses as they are now. Don't do much changes in that. Some increases some decreases. For example if we want
to do a simple calculation Then considering to current expenses Suppose my expense is 50,000 The profile we are taking has
expnses of 50,000 per month. Then it is 6 lakh rupees per year. You have to put today's expenses. You don't have to put off retirement age. That's all it will insert. Inflation number How much inflation number we have to take? 7% inflation is mostly suggested by India. If you want to be conservative
then you can take 8%. If you want to be aggressive
then you can take 5-6%. Inflation you should calculate by your own. Every year how my expenses are increasing? If you know little bit idea about that These things are increasing
according to my expenses. Edcuation expenses children's fees It increases almost 8-10% every year. Rentals mostly 10%. Landlords mostly increases rent by 10%. My personal inflation is 8, 9-10%. You take according to your. So for calculation here
I am taking 7% inflation.

Then return on investment. On the basis of return on investment. How much is my return on investment? Before retirement and after retirement. Now I am retiring at 60. At 30 I am starting investing. How much should I invest for that? How much retirement corpus I will get? The reason I am investing now. On that how much return should I expect? It depends where you are investing. If you feel I will invest
mostly in equity markets. Retirement oriented because it is very long horizon. I am of 30 years and retiring at 60 years. Horizon is of 30 years. All that I am investing I will invest mostly on equity. Then we can take 11-12%
return on investment All that we will invest now. Or we kept in equity we can take that. If you feel This house is my retirement corpus This will increase according to that. Then on real estate the return
on expectations that remains. Basically there is round inflation of 7-8%. It depends on you if you have EPFO. That is a very big retirement corpus On EPF we get around 8%. According to that you have invested here.

Overall that you are investing Or you are planning This is for retirement
and I am going to invest. What are expected returns on that? Till 60. Pre retirement is retirement on investment. Suppose it is 12%. Whole the money I will put in equity. Then you took 12% return. Then post retirement my corpse will become. How much will it grow? Suppose I retire and I get corpus of 5 crores. Then 5 crore rupees Where will I invest? Again very difficult question If you are of 30 years then in 60 years.

This is very difficult. This is a very big assumption. We have to think that mostly at 60 our risk profile decreases. We will not take much equity allocation. Suppose now we have 60-70 equity allocation That time it becomes 20-30% or 40%. I go a little bit on conservative. I say to most of the people Take percentage equal to inflation I get return same as inflation. If I want to take. Then 0.5-1% extra. We took here 8%. Means 8% of post retirement. My corpus will grow 8% after that. Inflation will remain 7%. This is planning according to that. We will discuss these points later. Therefore I am doing all these zero. We inserted these things. What we say? Our retirement age, life expectancy. Our annual expense, inflation. These all are our compulsory fields. If i sumbit this now. Sorry some value needs to be inserted.

Randomly value we are inserting. So that it can work. If i sumbit this now. Then I need retirement
corpus of 14.6 crores. If you are of 30 years and you have to do expense of 50k per month. At today's value Today's 50k offcourse will not remain same at the time of retirement. They will increase with inflation. If you have to maintain today lifestyle The 50k expenses you are doing today Same you want to do at 60. After 30 years. This is the value after 30 years. Don't be so afraid. Today 14.5 crore is very much. After 30 years the value of 14.5 That should be arounf 70-80 lakh or 1 crore I am doing guess work. It will not be more than that. Think if I have 1 crore rupees today then I will be able to do for next 35 years. 60-95 years means 35 years 35k per month That to inflation to adjust it. I will get it consistently till 95 in 95 it will become zero. If i invest lumpsum then i can invest 50 lakhs.

Considering I don't have anything. If I have 50 lakh rupees I will invest it. For 30 years they will grow by 12%. Expected pre-retirement. Then also my retirement money will be done. Monthly Sip that I have to do That is around 50,000 in this. 48,000 rupees sip i need in this. What is the meaning of step up? I will tell this in next. If you have plan in 30 years 60 years. I have to do all these things. Then you have to do monthly sip of 48,000. To retire for next 30 years. Remember this is a monthly sip. It will not increase. Every year you have to do 48k consistently. Obviously our salary will increase in years Inflation increases salary increases. Now 48,000 will seem so big But after 3-5 years You will not feel big amount. That's what I am saying. In that our step up point comes. Now you will say I don't have 48,000 to invest. It is a very big amount. From where 48,000 will come. If we are spending 50,000 Then by saving 50,000 we
can invest in retirement corpus.

That is not possible. Then in that our second comes step up sip What is the meaning of step up sip? What is annual increase in our income? Can we increase sip every year? I cannot invest 48,000 now but from next year i can increase. If you think My annual increase in income. If inflation is of 7%. With 7% income should increase If we take seven With 7% it is increasing. We considered 7% inflation. Salary is also increasing by 7%. In worst case salary is not changing. With 7% there is increase in salary. Existing investment Do you have any investment now? That you think this is my retirement income From that also it will reduce. Suppose if you have EPFO ​​corpus Suppose of 5 lakh rupees. 5 lakh rupees i inserted here. This is my EPFO ​​of 5 lakh rupees.

I will use it for retirement. On that how much return I will get on EPFO? Return are 8% Then we consider we will get 8%. It is tax free means you will get 8% Suppose i have 5 lakh rupees On that i will get 8% more. Now let's do calculation again. Now since EPFO ​​arrived. From 48 it became 46. Retirement corpus remained same. So now we have to do Sip of 46,000. We can do step up sip of 24,000. We invested 24,000 rupees this month. Every year we increase that by 7%. From annual increase in income we have to do this annual increase in sip. Today you started sip of 24,300. Next year increased 7% on that. Then again in next year increase 7% on that Compounding 7%. Increase 7% every year Till the age of 60. Then also your goal will be achieved. Then you will have 14.6 crores rupees. Considering these were our rates of returns So it is very very good. You can apply so much
permutations and combinations on this. I have little more money than 24,000. I can do upto 35,000. Can I retire early? Then can I retire at 58? On 58 it will happen at 29,000.

I have 35,000. Can I retire at 55? Now your interesting calculation will start No you need 37,000 For retirement at 55. Early retirement you can take at 37,000. If i do 37,000 per year. I invest in such investments
that give me 12% every year. 7% increase i put minimum. If you think 7% increase is less. Consider growth of salary minimum 8-10%. Why not? Consider 10%. Then in Rs 28,000 you can retire at 55. Retirement corpus also reduced. As early you retire that much less corpus you will want. Value of money comes less. At that time its value will be more. At the age of 55 we need 11.6 crores. How much lump sum funding we need? How much monthly sip
and stepup sip we need? I considered 10% annual increase. Like this If you can do so many
permutations and combinations. You can plan yourself. When can I become financially free? I think this is very interesting calculator If you like as i am a conservative investor I am not taking 12% from whole equity. Suppose we take 9%. This we keep 10. The rate of return become 9% from 12%.

Obviously both the sip's will increase. You can do calculation according to that. Which type of investor is I am? If you think here is also 9
then it will change again. These things you can do so many permutations and combinations
based on your profile. You will get so much support and understand If I invest this much money For this much time Then I can go towards a better retirement. This is how you should work on these things. You can plan early retirement. You want to spend so much or not. 50,000 will not be sufficient. I want to increase my lifestyle. Now I am spending 50,000. But at that time I want to spend 75,000. Acc to that by using
permutation and combination What are my savings now? I can plan such investments or not. Then in those things you will get
so much help from these calculator..

Do check that on our website. If you have any comment If there are complications
then visit our website. Below is our email address and
whats app number is given. All things are written below. You can email us there
if you have any query. Below there is comment section also. Must write in comment section. Hit a like if you liked the video. If you think some knowledge is added Then hit a like Have a great time ahead friends Jai Hind

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Kevin O’Leary: Why Early Retirement Doesn’t Work

This whole idea of financial independence retire early doesn't work. Let me tell you why. It happened to me. On the sale of my
first company, I achieved great liquidity and I
thought to myself, "Hey. I'm 36. I can retire now." I retired for three years. I was bored out of my mind. Working is not
just about money. People don't understand this very
often until they stop working. Work defines who you are. It provides a place where
you're social with people. It gives you interaction with people
all day long in an interesting way. It even helps you live longer
and is very, very good for brain health. Staying stimulated is how people
live into their 90s. I'm not kidding. So when am I retiring? Never. Never. I don't know where I'm going
after I'm dead, but I'll be working when I get there too..

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How To Retire At 30 Living Off Investments

in order to live off of
your investments completely. And I know that the title of this video may sound crazy about retiring by 30, and there are a lot of people
out there selling a pipe dream of you can retire by 30
as long as you invest in this course, or go buy real estate and while that may work for some people I'm not here to sell you guys a course or to pitch you on any
kind of product like that. What we're going to
simply talk about here is how much money you need to have invested in order to live off of your investments and essentially not have
to work to earn your money.

And believe it or not, there's
actually countless people out there who have in fact
retired as early as 30 years old, by following this exact strategy
that I'm going to outline. So if this idea of retiring early and not having to work for your money is something that interests you. What I want to ask you
guys to do is go ahead and drop a like on this
video just show your support. I really do appreciate
that as it helps out with the algorithm and allows this video to get shared with more people. But what we're going to look
at in particular in this video is something called the 4% rule, and that essentially
shows you just how much money you need to have set aside, in order to live
off of your investments. Now you can in fact live off of different types of investments like real estate or the stock market for
example or a business that's providing income for you. But what we're going to use in this video as an example is a passive
stock market investment, and we'll show you exactly
how much money you need to have invested in order
to live off of that income.

So the goal here with this
strategy is to simply invest your money and have a large
amount of money invested and then you would
essentially be living off of the interest income or
the growth of that money without touching the principle. And as I'm sure you guys can imagine if you're not touching the principle or your initial investment, then your money could
foreseeably last forever. Now, the sooner you're able to retire is all based on how much
money you're able to save up and how little money you are
spending each and every month, and there's actually a
whole movement of people that are following this
exact strategy, and it's something out there called FIRE, and FIRE stands for financial
independence retire early. And there's a lot of
people who are doing blogs and videos and all kinds of
stuff about this concept, and there are countless
examples out there, of people who have retired
as early as 30 or even less.

By following these strategies. Alright guys so there's
basically three steps you have to follow in order to do this, and as I'm sure you can imagine, step number one is to be frugal or to spend as little money as possible, because ultimately what
you're looking to do is save and invest enough
money that the interest or the dividends, or
whatever the growth is pays for your monthly living expenses.

And as I'm sure you guys can guess if your monthly expenses
are $6,000 versus $3,000, you're going to need a
lot more money invested to cover those expenses. So being frugal and saving
as much money as possible is actually going to serve
two different purposes here. Well, number one, the
less that you're living on the more of your paycheck
you're able to save up, and the more of your paycheck
you're able to save up, the more you're able to
contribute to that freedom fund, which will eventually be paying for all of your living expenses. And then second of all by spending as little money as possible
every single month, you actually don't need
to save up as much money to potentially live off of the interest or the growth of your money.

And we're going to go over
those exact numbers right now. Alright guys so step number two
that you have to follow here is going to be a tough one, but that is going to be saving 50 to 70% of your take home income and again, if you're looking to
retire by 30 years old, let's say you want to work from 20 to 30, and then not work for
the rest of your life, you're going to have to take
some drastic actions here. And that is why you need to live off of a microscopic amount of money. And that's why step number
one is so important, by cutting down as much as possible on those monthly expenses. So people who are trying to do this, you're not going to see
them driving brand new cars, you're not going to see
them going on vacations, they're probably going to be,
you know, eating canned beans and doing campfires in the
backyard as summer entertainment. Not that there's anything wrong with that, but they are literally spending
as little money as possible, because they're focusing
on the long term picture of what they are trying to do.

So people who are following
this FIRE movement are often aiming to save 30
times their annual expenses, and that will allow them to
withdraw about 4% per year without basically touching that principle and that is where that
4% rule comes into play. And that is basically where you're able to draw from an account about 4% per year, and over a long period of
time based on the growth of that account and those investments, it shouldn't be chipping
away at the principle which should in theory
give you unlimited money. So what you're aiming
to do here is to lower your monthly expenses as much as possible. Figure out what it costs
you to live per year, multiply that by 30, and then
save up that amount of money by saving 50 to 70% of your
paycheck every single week or month, or however often
you are getting paid. Alright so now the question
you guys have been waiting for, just how much money do
you need to have saved up and invested to live off of that money following the 4% rule. Well if your annual expenses
are $20,000 per year, they would recommend having 30 times that amount of money saved and
invested, so $600,000.

If your annual expenses were $35,000, that number becomes 1.05 million. If you're somebody
spending $50,000 per year on your living expenses
you would need to have $1.5 million saved and invested,
and for the final figure here, if you spent $100,000 per
year on cars and housing and food and all of that,
you would need to have about $3 million to successfully
follow this strategy. So I'm sure this goes without saying guys, the best way to follow the strategy and to reach that retirement as quickly as possible is going to be
to keep your monthly expenses as low as possible. And just to put it in
perspective for you guys, every additional $100
that you spend per month, if you follow this is
an additional $36,000 you need to have set
aside in that freedom fund to support that $100 of monthly spending. So if you're serious
about this and you want to retire at 30, or even younger, you are spending literally as little money as humanly possible. Alright so the final step
to following this strategy is going to be passively
investing in the stock market. So most people following this strategy are actually following
the Warren Buffett style of passively investing in index funds.

And if you're not familiar,
index funds are basically a way for you to have diversified
exposure to the stock market. Where you're not essentially
picking what stocks are going to outperform,
you're just passively owning the entire market. So people following this strategy are not out there trying
to beat the market, they are not stock
traders or stock pickers they simply passively invest
in these low fee index funds, one of the most popular ones being VOO or the vanguard 500 fund. And essentially what you are doing, is buying a small piece of the 500 largest publicly traded companies out there, and all the different
dividends those companies pay are all collectively put together, and then you earn a quarterly
dividend from that ETF. And over the last hundred
years or so the stock market, on average, has returned
about eight to 10% per year. So if you were only drawing
4% from that account, based on historical data, you should never be
touching that principle over a long period of time.

And that is how you would
be able to live off of 30 times your annual income, if you save that money and invest it. Now that being said that
is the perfect segue into the sponsor for this
video which is Webull. So if you guys are
interested in getting started with investing in the stock market, this is a totally commission
free broker out there, meaning you're not paying
any fees to please trades with them and you can
purchase the Vanguard 500 ETF that we're talking about in this video right on that Webull platform, and not only that, they're
willing to give you up to two completely free stocks just for opening up an account with them. Number one, if you open the account, you're going to get a free
stock worth up to $250, and then when you fund the account, you'll get an additional
stock worth up to 1000.

So if you do the math there, that is two completely free stocks worth up to $1,250. Now I am affiliated with Webull, so I do earn a commission in the process if you use my link, but
if you guys are interested in grabbing two completely free stocks that is going to be down
in the description below. So finally, the last
thing I want to do here is to put all of this together, and go through a real
example of how you could in fact follow this strategy and even retire by 30. Now again, this is going to
require some very drastic saving because essentially you're trying to work for about 10 years of your life and then not have to work
for the rest of your life. So most people will never
be able to accomplish this, because of the amount of
sacrifice that is required, with that being said, let's go ahead and run
through the numbers now. So let's say you're earning
a salary of $75,000 per year from your job, and ideally,
you don't have any, you know school loans,
student loans, medical bills, or anything like that.

So you haven't gotten
sucked into the consumerism and you don't have like a brand new car so your expenses are as low as possible. And I know this sounds like
you know theoretical situation, but this was actually
about the same situation I was in, when I graduated
college I was 20 years old, now I was making about $68,000, so a little bit less, but I had no debts, I had no car payment,
and so I was somebody who could have potentially
followed this strategy. So after you pay your
taxes, your take home pay is going to be around $56,250. Now we know already in
order to pull this off, you need to save 50 to
70% of that take home pay in order to actually build up enough money to live off of that income. So we're going to assume
you are saving 70% of that take home pay. So you would need to live off of 30% of that post tax income, which
amounts to just over $16,000, or around $1400 per month. Now, is that possible? It absolutely is.

Is it easy? Absolutely not, you're certainly not going to be going out to the
bar and buying beers or going out to dinner,
you're probably going to be living in a tiny apartment driving an old car and eating at home for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. But if that type of
sacrifice is worth it to you for the long term picture, it is something you may
be willing to do yourself. So each year you would
be saving and investing a staggering amount of money, which is 70% of your take home pay
or just over a $39,000. And that is how you would
be able to pull this off, and assuming you kept that
cost of living the same at around $16,000, just over 16,000.

Your freedom number, or 30
times your annual expenses, would be just over $506,000. So, how long would it take
you to save up that money? Let's go ahead and answer that now. Well if you took that
$39,375 per year of money that you are saving and
invested in the stock market, earning 8% return, and
as we said, historically, it's an eight to 10% so we're going to go on the conservative side, well in 10 years at 8%
return career you would have $570,408.40, meaning you could then, if you kept those living
expenses the same, following that 4% rule, not have to work for your
money past that point. And just to circle back
guys what this really comes down to is the level
of sacrifice involved. Are you really willing to live
off of about $1400 per month, or do you want to have vacations and going out to get dinner
and things like that? So it's not people who are doing this that are out there traveling and dining it's people that are living
as frugal as possible and finding enjoyment
in other areas of life other than just, you know,
spending money on dining and things like that.

Now, is this a strategy I
would personally follow? Probably not because I
am one of those people that enjoys traveling, I enjoy dining, and I do spend a little bit
more than the average person, so my freedom number would be
multiple millions of dollars, but instead I follow the
strategy of earning as much as possible and saving a
lot of that earned money, and then eventually allowing
that to supplement my income by having that interest
or the growth of my money paying for a lot of
those things that I want. And believe it or not,
guys, there are honestly countless people out
there that have followed this exact strategy and
retired at 30 or less. One of the most well known people being Mr. Money Mustache, he has a whole blog where he documented this whole journey of becoming financially
independent and retiring early with both him and his wife.

So I'm going to link up his blog down in the description below
as well as a couple of other stories about
people who have followed this exact strategy and
retired at 30 or less. So that's going to wrap
up this video guys, thanks so much for watching. If you're new to this channel, make sure you subscribe and
hit that bell for notifications so you don't miss future videos, and I hope to see you in the next one..

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Kevin O’Leary: Why Early Retirement Doesn’t Work

This whole idea of financial independence retire early doesn't work. Let me tell you why. It happened to me. On the sale of my
first company, I achieved great liquidity and I
thought to myself, "Hey. I'm 36. I can retire now." I retired for three years. I was bored out of my mind. Working is not
just about money. People don't understand this very
often until they stop working. Work defines who you are. It provides a place where
you're social with people. It gives you interaction with people
all day long in an interesting way. It even helps you live longer
and is very, very good for brain health. Staying stimulated is how people
live into their 90s. I'm not kidding. So when am I retiring? Never. Never. I don't know where I'm going
after I'm dead, but I'll be working when I get there too..

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Retirement Planning Home

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Kevin O’Leary: Why Early Retirement Doesn’t Work

This whole idea of financial independence retire early doesn't work. Let me tell you why. It happened to me. On the sale of my
first company, I achieved great liquidity and I
thought to myself, "Hey. I'm 36. I can retire now." I retired for three years. I was bored out of my mind. Working is not
just about money. People don't understand this very
often until they stop working.

Work defines who you are. It provides a place where
you're social with people. It gives you interaction with people
all day long in an interesting way. It even helps you live longer
and is very, very good for brain health. Staying stimulated is how people
live into their 90s. I'm not kidding. So when am I retiring? Never. Never. I don't know where I'm going
after I'm dead, but I'll be working when I get there too..

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10 Levels of Financial Independence And Early Retirement | How to Retire Early

Long-term financial goals can sometimes seem
so big that they feel almost unattainable especially when we’re just getting started
on our road to financial independence. I and many others like me in the financially
independent, retired early community have found it helpful to break down the goal of
becoming financially independent into smaller and more manageable levels of financial independence. Not only because it makes it easier for us
to track our progress, which in turns helps us to stay motivated throughout the process,
but also because it helps us get over that initial hurdle of starting to chip away at
this mountain of a task. In today’s video, I’m going to take you
through what I consider to be the 10 levels of financial independence as well as give
an example on how to go from the first level to the top level in your lifetime. Hey everyone Daniel here and welcome to Next
Level Life a channel where you can learn about Investing, debt, retirement, and many other
general financial education videos because the school's aren't going to do it for us.

So if any of those topics sound interesting
to you or if you want to learn how to better handle your money and have more financial
freedom be sure to hit that subscribe button and the bell next to my name to be notified
every time I upload a video. And if you want to further support the growth
of this channel you can check out some of the links I’ve left down in the description
below which includes a 30-day free trial of Audible and 2 free audiobooks of your choice
as well as a list of some books on money I’d recommend checking out, or you can share this
video with a friend, and leave a comment below letting me know what topics you’d like me
to cover in future videos.

Now obviously these ideas of the levels of
financial independence are not solely my own nor are they very new as there are many articles
and blog posts that have covered this topic already and have done so for many years. So consider this more of a summary of many
of the ideas expressed in those articles and if you want to learn more about the topic
feel free to check out some of the articles for yourself. I’ve left some links in the description. With that out of the way, let’s get started. Okay so real quick the 10 levels of financial
Independence are Level 0 Financial dependence, level 1 Financial solvency, level 2 Financial
stability, level 3 debt Freedom, level four coasting Financial Independence (also sometimes
known as freedom from employer), level 5 Financial Security, level six Financial flexibility,
level 7 Financial independence, level eight Financial Freedom, and finally level 9 Financial
abundance. The levels are usually defined as something
like the following: Level 0 – Financial dependency is when your
debt payments and other living expenses are greater than your own income.

This means that you are in one way or another
dependent on someone or something else to help you pay for your bills or if you happen
to be a kid and don't actually have any bills you need someone else, usually your parents,
to pay to put food on the table and keep the lights on and have a roof over your head. This is the level that all of us start out
on and it is referred to as level 0 because as a financial dependent you obviously have
no Financial Independence. Level 1 – Financial solvency is when you are
current on all your debt payments and you can meet your financial commitments and your
other living expenses without any outside help. Level 2 – Financial stability is usually defined
as when you have built some sort of emergency fund in addition to being financially solvent. Level 3 – Is again debt freedom and it's defined
differently depending on who you ask. For some, it is being completely debt-free,
mortgage and everything.

For others, it's being just free of the high-interest
debts like credit cards but you still might have a mortgage or other debts like student
loans. And for some others, it is paying off all
of your debts except for the mortgage but your credit cards and student loans or car
loans all that stuff is all paid off. Level 4 – Coasting Financial Independence
also sometimes known as freedom from the employer, Barista Financial Independence, or Agency
in blogs and other mediums. I personally like the idea of it being coasting
Financial Independence so that's what I'm going to be using in this video but know that
some people refer to it by one of those other titles but the idea is the same. You have reached the level of coasting Financial
Independence when you could, if you wanted to, step down from a job that may be higher-paying
but may also be either less satisfying or more stressful or both into a new job that
is lower paying but more enjoyable or less stressful or both.

This is because in the early years of your
career or just thought most recent years you have managed to save a very decent sum of
money that would be able to provide for the later years of your retirement after it has
grown even if you don't put much more in. Therefore all you need to do is make enough
money to get you to age 60 or 65 or 70 or whatever your numbers work out to be when
that amount of money you've already invested will be able to fund your lifestyle because
it's been given enough time to grow. So in a sense, you've worked really really
hard and been very frugal in the first few years so that you can coast into your retirement. I have gone into more detail on the various
types of financial Independence in a previous video which I'll leave Linked In the description
if you're interested in learning more.

Level 5 – Financial Security is effectively
when your cash flow from wealth such as you are investments has grown to large enough
that it can provide for your annual basic survival expenses. Now I say survival expenses because I do differentiate
that from living expenses survival expenses are just the basic things you need to survive
Food, Water, Shelter, some form of transportation, clothing and probably insurance. This does not include things like Netflix
subscriptions or cable bills or things like that it is purely survival expenses. So this may not be exactly the ideal spot
to retire and I certainly wouldn't want to retire at this point but it is an important
level to keep in mind because it does give you… well security. If you were to get fired today and you were
on level 5 you would be okay you could survive until you found another job. This is essentially the first level that really
gives you I guess that piece of mind even if the lifestyle should you have chosen to
live it may not be the most lavish.

Level 6 – Financial flexibility is similar
to Financial Security just one step up. It is when you have the ability to live off
of your current cash flow from your wealth assuming that you have a flexible spending
plan that adjusts for up and downs in the market. So if the markets up 20% one year you're able
to spend a little bit more but if the market is down 20% the next year then you don't spend
quite as much. I’ve seen it defined many different ways
so it could vary depending on who you ask, but the one that I personally like the most
is that it is roughly half of your full financial independence goal, or roughly about 12.5x
your current annual expenses if you follow the 4% rule to get an idea of how much money
you need to retire like I’ve explained in previous videos.

So it isn't quite Financial Independence yet
but it's close. Level 7 – Is financial Independence and it's
usually based on the 4% rule which I have covered in a previous video. You can follow the 4% rule when you have saved
roughly 25x your annual expenses. The vast majority of the time this will be
enough money to allow you to maintain your current lifestyle in retirement and as a result,
you can be considered financially independent. And some articles end it right there but I
think there are a couple of levels that are a bit higher than that that are worth considering
even if some of us may decide to not ever try to achieve them because being at level
7 allows them to do what they wanted all along. So let's talk about those other levels. Level 8 – Is Financial Freedom which I've
often seen defined as the cash flow from your Investments is greater than financial Independence
and a few more life goals.

Life goals, of course, will differ for everybody
but this is could be something like taking a trip or two overseas or moving to a new
place you've always wanted to live but haven't had quite enough money to live there up till
now or whatever the case may be for you like I said it's different for everybody. Level 9 – Is financial abundance and this
is quite simply just that the cash flow from your Investments is more than you will ever
need.

You could spend it if you really wanted to
but it would actually take some effort. And the stuff from level 8 doesn't really
cut into it much at all. So you could up those goals even more and
still have more cash flow left over at the end of the year. This also probably has a slightly different
definition for each person depending on who you ask, but I like to think of it as roughly
3x your financial freedom number because this would allow you to experience a horrible bear
market where your investments go down by 50% and still has 1.5x the amount that you would
need to maintain the lifestyle you lead when you reach level 8.

To me, that means that it is likely more than
you will ever need, but again that one is strictly my own opinion on the matter. So those are the 10 levels of financial Independence,
now let's walk through a hypothetical example of how someone could go from Level 0 to being
financially independent in a single lifetime. John and Jane are recently married couple
each making $20 an hour at age 23 or $83,200 a year between them assuming no overtime. They manage this because they are not only
good hard-working people but got great grades in school and we're selective about the job
that they decided to pursue. Obviously just like everyone else they would
have started off as Financial dependents and as they were going through college they would
have been building up student loans that they would not have had the money to pay off (assuming
of course that they didn't earn enough money while in school to keep up with the rising
debt).

In all they have credit card debt, two car
payments and the student loans which have balances of $5,000, $35,000, and $60,000 respectively,
but since they got their jobs they are no longer financially dependent and their incomes
have allowed them to become current on all their debt payments without the help of others. In addition to the regular monthly debt payments,
their annual expenses are $48,000 a year. So they are currently in level one Financial
solvency and trying to figure out a way to move to level 2 Financial stability. In order to do that they need to figure out
a way to build up an emergency fund.

Now if they're following the 10 levels system
to a T then they would look to build a 3 to 6-month emergency fund of their survival expenses. However, this is not the only way to approach
it say if you were to follow Dave Ramsey 7 baby steps you would start off with just a
$1,000 starter emergency fund and then get right onto attacking your debts. And other Financial systems and plans may
have you approached it an entirely different way.

Either way is perfectly fine because the 10
levels system is not meant to be a financial formula per say it's more there to give us
some sort of guidepost so that we can better track our progress towards achieving Financial
Independence. But for the purposes of this video, I am going
to assume that they follow the 10 levels in order so we are going to be building up a
full emergency fund. In order to find how much of an emergency
fund they will need we will need to know how much money they need to survive not necessarily
on their current level of expenses while they have jobs but purely on Survival expenses
which are basically your four walls of your financial house or in other words food shelter
including utilities Basic clothing and some form of transportation as well as the insurances
that are related to that assuming there are any.

In this case, I'm going to assume that their
survival expenses are right around $3,000 a month. Which means that in order to get a 3-month
emergency fund they would need $9,000 in order to get a six-month emergency fund they would
need to save $18,000. Both John and Jane feel that their jobs are
pretty darn secure and the market is doing fairly well so it's not likely at least in
the near-term that they would get laid off because the company has to downsize so they
decide together that they are comfortable with having just a 3-month emergency fund
of $9,000. So with $83,200 a year in income, $48,000
a year and expenses, plus minimum monthly payments of $100 on the credit card which
is 2% of the balance, $550.78 on the car loans, and $621.83 on the student loans they will
have approximately $1,660.72 a month left over to start building their emergency fund.

However, both John and Jane have been looking
into their finances and researching a lot lately and they become fired up at the possibility
of becoming financially independent while they're still young. So they want to see if there's a way that
they can speed this whole process up. And as it turns out thankfully there are many. After taking a look at the options they decide
that they're going to work as much overtime as they possibly can (for the sake of Simplicity
I'm going to assume that they manage to work on average 5 hours per week of overtime which
will increase their monthly income by about $1,300 a month, meaning that instead of $1,660
a month they will have $2,960 a month left over) and they're going to sell both of their
cars and buy some nice used cars with cash to help knock down some of that initial debt. After putting out a couple of ads online they
managed to find buyers for each of their cars that is willing to give them $15,000.

So they take that $30,000 and use $5,000 of
it to pay off the credit card balance and another $10,000 to buy a couple of used cars
from someone that they know takes good care of their Vehicles whether that be a family
friend or just a mechanic that they Trust. The remaining $15,000 is thrown at their car
loans. This means that the credit card loan is fully
paid off and therefore the hundred-dollar minimum payment is no longer needed. So John and Jane start throwing $3,060 per
month into their emergency fund and get it fully funded in 3 months with a little bit
left over at the end of the third month to throw out their car loan. Over the course of those first three months,
they managed to bring the car loans balances down to $18,423 thanks in large part to the
$15,000 that they threw at it in the first month after selling the cars and also making
the minimum payments in the first three months. Now that their emergency fund is fully funded
however they're able to throw that $3,060 a month in addition to the $550 a month minimum
payment at the car loan and get it paid off in 6 months flat.

So a mere nine months into their Journey John
and Jane not only have a fully funded emergency fund but they also have paid off both of their
car loans. Now there are just the student loans to tackle. And thanks to the fact that they've been making
minimum payments on them for 9 months and the fact that they had a little over $3,000
at the end of the ninth month after paying off their car loans their student loans now
have a balance of $53,263. John and Jane follow the same pattern that
they did with the car loans throwing the $3,600+ which is what they now have left over at the
end of every month because they no longer had a $550 car payment to make and they managed
to get their student loans paid off in full in 13 months. So John and Jane have managed to become debt
free and have a fully funded emergency fund in 22 months.

They have now reached level three and because
of that they now have over $4,200 a month left over to start investing. This brings us to level four coasting Financial
Independence. Let's assume that John and Jane want to retire
by the age of 65. That means that whatever they put in now needs
to be enough to grow to a point where it can support their lifestyle in retirement by the
time they're 65. If we assume a rate of return on an average
in the market of about 10% before inflation and an inflation rate of about 3% per year
on average then we can get a rough estimate of how much John and Jane need to put away
in order to achieve a state of coasting Financial Independence. In this case, since they're 24 about to be
25 they will have somewhere in the neighborhood of 39 or 40 years to let the money grow before
needing to take any of it out. If their expenses were $48,000 a year at age
23 then 42 years later if we assume a 3% rate of inflation they would need a tad bit over
$166,000 each year to live on.

Again assuming we follow the 4% rule to figure
out how much they need once they fully retire to be financially independent that means that
they would have to have at least $4.15 million invested in the market by the time they turn
65. In their case, they would need about $110,000
saved up give or take in order to achieve coasting Financial Independence and because
they're able to save about $4,233 a month now that they’re debt free, they’re able
to hit that goal in 2 years flat.

Meaning that in theory, they would be able
to step down from their jobs to a more rewarding less stressful but probably lower-paying job
just 3 years and 10 months into their financial Journey. That is incredible! But like I said coasting Financial Independence
wasn't their end goal. They wanted to be fully Financial Independent
so they keep working and investing for now. The next level is level 5 Financial Security
which is achieved when your cash flow from your Investments is greater than your annual
survival expenses which remember is $3,000 a month or $36,000 a year in John and James
case. Because they are debt-free, are making good
money at their jobs, and being intentional with their finances they Achieve Financial
Security in a little over 4 years with over $367,000 in their portfolio.

It is been a mere 87 months or 7 years and
3 months since they began their financial Journey. John and Jane are 30 years old and they are
able to get by on their Investments alone. In theory, they could retire now, it wouldn't
be the most glamorous retirement and it wasn't their goal but it is an option they have. They don't have to worry about losing their
jobs anymore because even if both of them lost their jobs today they would be able to
make it long enough to either find a new job or some other source of income. This is really the first level where you start
to get that piece of mind when it comes to money at least in my opinion. Next is financial flexibility which as I mentioned
earlier in the video has many definitions depending on who you ask but for the purposes
of this video, I'm assuming that it is roughly 12.5x your current annual expenses which for
John and Jane would be roughly $600,000 or about $855,000 if you account for inflation. This means that they would Achieve Financial
flexibility 9 years and 8 months into their Journey not accounting for inflation or about
11 years and 9 months if we do account for inflation.

John and Jane continue investing through all
the highs and lows of the markets until they reach Financial Independence exactly 14 years
into their financial Journey assuming we don't account for inflation or 18 years and 3 months
if we do. So you might be wondering why did I split
up the accounting for inflation time frames and the not accounting for inflation time
frames should we always be accounting for inflation? Well technically yes but the reason I split
them up is because in my experience taking this journey myself as well as seeing others
take it, this journey changes how you view a lot of things and more often than not those
changes lead to you valuing things such as freedom of mobility and location and freedom
of time to be able to spend with the people you love more and valuing more material things
that cost possibly a lot of money less and less. That's not to say that everybody becomes minimalist
going through this journey, I'm not saying that at all but I have seen a lot of people
who have gone through this journey become closer to minimalist than they were when they
started the journey as they find out more and more things that they used to buy just
don’t provide enough value or happiness for them to be worth the purchase.

They find better uses for their money and
time and as a result, they generally tend to spend less. Which means that even though inflation is
technically increasing your expenses by making every dollar less and less valuable over time,
if you're also decreasing your expenses because what you value is changing it may even out
or in some cases, you may even see your regular expenses going down year-over-year as you
continue through this journey. So that's why I split them up. And, before I go, I do want to mention that
based on what I've seen on various articles and forums some people really like to have
even more goals to chase as they go through this journey than what I've laid out today
in this video so if that's something that would help you feel free to break down these
levels even further then I have today this is obviously just the list that I used and
what worked for me, but you could take it even further.

For example, Debt Freedom could be broken
down into three separate stages: One where you are free from all high-interest debt,
a second where you are free from all debts except for the house (if you have one), and
a third where you are totally debt-free. You could tackle the coasting Financial Independence
level in a similar way breaking it down into two stages: One where are you have invested
enough to survive in retirement and a second where you have invested enough in order to
maintain your current lifestyle, adjusting for inflation of course, in retirement.

And the financial independence level could
also be broken down into three stages: Stage one would be where you are at a survivable
level of financial Independence, stage 2 would be where you have achieved leanfire status,
and stage 3 would be where you have achieved full Financial Independence on your current
lifestyle assuming that it is above the leanfire level. So what do you guys think of this 10 levels
system of tracking our progress to financial Independence? Do any of you use a similar system to track
your progress? If so, what is it and what level, step, or
stage are you guys currently on? Let me know in the comments section below. But that'll do it for me today once again
if you enjoyed this video be sure to subscribe and hit that Bell next to my name so that
you'll be notified of all my future uploads.

I generally upload every single Monday, and
if you have a friend that would be interested in this kind of content be sure to share it
with them and let's really get this information out there and start our own Financial revolution..

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How We Retired Early With $540K At 40 In Colorado

I started getting
diagnosed with some fairly serious medical
ailments. I just began to realize
that I had been working for a retirement that I
may never enjoy. We just knew we wanted
the freedom to make our own choices with our
time. And that's where
financial independence came in. Then it turned
into how fast can we do this? Let's get it done
as fast as we can. We started to accumulate
real estate in the vein of let's have an
additional source of income besides my job. We accumulated 19 units
over the span of just from 2016 to 2019. I'm Debbie and I'm Chris. We are 43 and live in
Colorado and retired by the age of 40. I never wanted to be a
millionaire. That was never a goal,
even, you know, now in my forties, I just wanted
to have enough money to be able to pay my bills. When I was 21, 22,
somewhere in there, I remember reading The
Millionaire Next Door. It was eye opening to me
because the stories they highlighted in that book
were very similar to what we do. Once it became in
that realm of reality that I could maybe be a
millionaire, then I did become fascinated with
the idea of being a millionaire in both
healthy and unhealthy ways.

Once Debbie left her
job, we're now completely dependent on my job. Honestly, like, I'm sure
there was more than this, but I tell the story
that basically I just stopped going to Subway. Obviously, that's not
the whole case, but that's all it really
felt like. Once we started tracking
our spending a little bit better with budgeting, I
was the guy that was always trying to turn
the knob down on our spending. Chris used to think it
was fun to like try to spend $100 a month on
groceries and just eat what came out of the
pantry.

So we both kind of had
this thought, what if you want to leave your job
someday? That thought easily
turned into how can we use our money to buy us
more time? I was mainly hearing a
lot of stories about rental real estate. Some people were were
building mega empires with rental real estate.
I wasn't looking to do that. I just wanted to
have additional income. And in the in the
process of going from we don't know anything
about being landlords and real estate owners to
let's buy our first property, I scoured the
Internet and spent a lot of time listening to
podcasts, watching YouTube videos, reading
blogs and forums.

And we got this like
eight and a half by eleven vision board type
of thing. So it was just something
that we could write on with chalk that we had
in our kitchen that would remind us of our goals. And, and as I was
writing those goals down, I believe we had like by
the end of 2016, we were going to have two
properties and by the end of 2017 we were going to
have four properties. We were getting
properties that other people didn't want. There was something that
was a bit of an ugly duckling about them. For me, a very difficult
part of this was a lot of elbow grease, fixing up
the ugly things, working on the houses, getting
smoke, smells out, painting everything,
tearing a bunch of flooring out. I'm
spending full days over there. Chris is getting
off work. He's spending nights and
weekends over at these rental properties to get
them ready for tenants and make them nice
places to live.

And as we were doing
that, I'm still saving 50 to 60% of our income
through my paycheck. All the extra money we
weren't spending out of your paycheck was going
toward buying more rental homes. All of the cash
flow we were getting from rentals was going toward
buying more rental homes. We accumulated 19 units
over the span of just from 2016 to 2019.

So it was a pretty
pretty fast and furious four years. We actually ended up
reaching fire at least three years earlier than
we had projected. So gross income from our
rental properties can vary based on vacancy,
capital expenditure, rehab, repairs, those
kinds of things. But it is between 8 to
10000 per month and our net income from our
rental properties is between 4 to 6000 a
month. So the money we live off
of comes purely from our real estate investments. We do have mortgages on
all of our rental properties that we
consider business debt. Our tenants pay those
mortgages for us essentially, and rents
continue to rise as they do so as the mortgage
goes down. Right now, our
investments look like we have about $350,000 in a
combination of traditional IRAs and
Roth IRAs and a brokerage account, $35,000 set
aside in a 529 account for our girls and
another $20,000 in bonds.

The insurance that she
sells for one month a year provides that extra
cushion of safety or comfort, as well as some
other discretionary spending. Our budget now
in FIRE, it looks very similar to what it was
pre FIRE in that none of our categories really
went any different direction except for
travel. We usually have about
$10,000 in our travel budget over the course
of any time, and it's more than we spend. Instead of having a job
where I would work 48 weeks a year and have
four weeks off, I would say now that I work
probably four weeks a year and have 48 weeks
off.

And we found in our lives
that meaning and purpose are important to our
emotional and physical health. And part of that
is around work. We are really enjoying
having this freedom of time to make
connections, to travel and explore. Our
daughters are getting older whether we like it
or not. They'll be graduating
and I'm excited to be a part of of their lives
as they move forward into their next chapters and
have the abundance of time to be able to be in
their lives as much as they will allow us or as
much as as feels comfortable.

I think when we were
searching for financial independence, what we
wanted was freedom and independence from having
to go to a place and do with things someone else
told us to do. And we still want that
and we value that. But I think what we
found through it is a much deeper, fuller,
richer life..

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How To Retire At 30 Living Off Investments

in order to live off of
your investments completely. And I know that the title of this video may sound crazy about retiring by 30, and there are a lot of people
out there selling a pipe dream of you can retire by 30
as long as you invest in this course, or go buy real estate and while that may work for some people I'm not here to sell you guys a course or to pitch you on any
kind of product like that. What we're going to
simply talk about here is how much money you need to have invested in order to live off of your investments and essentially not have
to work to earn your money. And believe it or not, there's
actually countless people out there who have in fact
retired as early as 30 years old, by following this exact strategy
that I'm going to outline. So if this idea of retiring early and not having to work for your money is something that interests you. What I want to ask you
guys to do is go ahead and drop a like on this
video just show your support.

I really do appreciate
that as it helps out with the algorithm and allows this video to get shared with more people. But what we're going to look
at in particular in this video is something called the 4% rule, and that essentially
shows you just how much money you need to have set aside, in order to live
off of your investments. Now you can in fact live off of different types of investments like real estate or the stock market for
example or a business that's providing income for you. But what we're going to use in this video as an example is a passive
stock market investment, and we'll show you exactly
how much money you need to have invested in order
to live off of that income. So the goal here with this
strategy is to simply invest your money and have a large
amount of money invested and then you would
essentially be living off of the interest income or
the growth of that money without touching the principle.

And as I'm sure you guys can imagine if you're not touching the principle or your initial investment, then your money could
foreseeably last forever. Now, the sooner you're able to retire is all based on how much
money you're able to save up and how little money you are
spending each and every month, and there's actually a
whole movement of people that are following this
exact strategy, and it's something out there called FIRE, and FIRE stands for financial
independence retire early. And there's a lot of
people who are doing blogs and videos and all kinds of
stuff about this concept, and there are countless
examples out there, of people who have retired
as early as 30 or even less. By following these strategies. Alright guys so there's
basically three steps you have to follow in order to do this, and as I'm sure you can imagine, step number one is to be frugal or to spend as little money as possible, because ultimately what
you're looking to do is save and invest enough
money that the interest or the dividends, or
whatever the growth is pays for your monthly living expenses.

And as I'm sure you guys can guess if your monthly expenses
are $6,000 versus $3,000, you're going to need a
lot more money invested to cover those expenses. So being frugal and saving
as much money as possible is actually going to serve
two different purposes here. Well, number one, the
less that you're living on the more of your paycheck
you're able to save up, and the more of your paycheck
you're able to save up, the more you're able to
contribute to that freedom fund, which will eventually be paying for all of your living expenses. And then second of all by spending as little money as possible
every single month, you actually don't need
to save up as much money to potentially live off of the interest or the growth of your money.

And we're going to go over
those exact numbers right now. Alright guys so step number two
that you have to follow here is going to be a tough one, but that is going to be saving 50 to 70% of your take home income and again, if you're looking to
retire by 30 years old, let's say you want to work from 20 to 30, and then not work for
the rest of your life, you're going to have to take
some drastic actions here.

And that is why you need to live off of a microscopic amount of money. And that's why step number
one is so important, by cutting down as much as possible on those monthly expenses. So people who are trying to do this, you're not going to see
them driving brand new cars, you're not going to see
them going on vacations, they're probably going to be,
you know, eating canned beans and doing campfires in the
backyard as summer entertainment. Not that there's anything wrong with that, but they are literally spending
as little money as possible, because they're focusing
on the long term picture of what they are trying to do. So people who are following
this FIRE movement are often aiming to save 30
times their annual expenses, and that will allow them to
withdraw about 4% per year without basically touching that principle and that is where that
4% rule comes into play.

And that is basically where you're able to draw from an account about 4% per year, and over a long period of
time based on the growth of that account and those investments, it shouldn't be chipping
away at the principle which should in theory
give you unlimited money. So what you're aiming
to do here is to lower your monthly expenses as much as possible.

Figure out what it costs
you to live per year, multiply that by 30, and then
save up that amount of money by saving 50 to 70% of your
paycheck every single week or month, or however often
you are getting paid. Alright so now the question
you guys have been waiting for, just how much money do
you need to have saved up and invested to live off of that money following the 4% rule. Well if your annual expenses
are $20,000 per year, they would recommend having 30 times that amount of money saved and
invested, so $600,000. If your annual expenses were $35,000, that number becomes 1.05 million. If you're somebody
spending $50,000 per year on your living expenses
you would need to have $1.5 million saved and invested,
and for the final figure here, if you spent $100,000 per
year on cars and housing and food and all of that,
you would need to have about $3 million to successfully
follow this strategy.

So I'm sure this goes without saying guys, the best way to follow the strategy and to reach that retirement as quickly as possible is going to be
to keep your monthly expenses as low as possible. And just to put it in
perspective for you guys, every additional $100
that you spend per month, if you follow this is
an additional $36,000 you need to have set
aside in that freedom fund to support that $100 of monthly spending. So if you're serious
about this and you want to retire at 30, or even younger, you are spending literally as little money as humanly possible. Alright so the final step
to following this strategy is going to be passively
investing in the stock market. So most people following this strategy are actually following
the Warren Buffett style of passively investing in index funds. And if you're not familiar,
index funds are basically a way for you to have diversified
exposure to the stock market. Where you're not essentially
picking what stocks are going to outperform,
you're just passively owning the entire market.

So people following this strategy are not out there trying
to beat the market, they are not stock
traders or stock pickers they simply passively invest
in these low fee index funds, one of the most popular ones being VOO or the vanguard 500 fund. And essentially what you are doing, is buying a small piece of the 500 largest publicly traded companies out there, and all the different
dividends those companies pay are all collectively put together, and then you earn a quarterly
dividend from that ETF.

And over the last hundred
years or so the stock market, on average, has returned
about eight to 10% per year. So if you were only drawing
4% from that account, based on historical data, you should never be
touching that principle over a long period of time. And that is how you would
be able to live off of 30 times your annual income, if you save that money and invest it. Now that being said that
is the perfect segue into the sponsor for this
video which is Webull. So if you guys are
interested in getting started with investing in the stock market, this is a totally commission
free broker out there, meaning you're not paying
any fees to please trades with them and you can
purchase the Vanguard 500 ETF that we're talking about in this video right on that Webull platform, and not only that, they're
willing to give you up to two completely free stocks just for opening up an account with them. Number one, if you open the account, you're going to get a free
stock worth up to $250, and then when you fund the account, you'll get an additional
stock worth up to 1000.

So if you do the math there, that is two completely free stocks worth up to $1,250. Now I am affiliated with Webull, so I do earn a commission in the process if you use my link, but
if you guys are interested in grabbing two completely free stocks that is going to be down
in the description below. So finally, the last
thing I want to do here is to put all of this together, and go through a real
example of how you could in fact follow this strategy and even retire by 30.

Now again, this is going to
require some very drastic saving because essentially you're trying to work for about 10 years of your life and then not have to work
for the rest of your life. So most people will never
be able to accomplish this, because of the amount of
sacrifice that is required, with that being said, let's go ahead and run
through the numbers now. So let's say you're earning
a salary of $75,000 per year from your job, and ideally,
you don't have any, you know school loans,
student loans, medical bills, or anything like that. So you haven't gotten
sucked into the consumerism and you don't have like a brand new car so your expenses are as low as possible.

And I know this sounds like
you know theoretical situation, but this was actually
about the same situation I was in, when I graduated
college I was 20 years old, now I was making about $68,000, so a little bit less, but I had no debts, I had no car payment,
and so I was somebody who could have potentially
followed this strategy. So after you pay your
taxes, your take home pay is going to be around $56,250. Now we know already in
order to pull this off, you need to save 50 to
70% of that take home pay in order to actually build up enough money to live off of that income. So we're going to assume
you are saving 70% of that take home pay. So you would need to live off of 30% of that post tax income, which
amounts to just over $16,000, or around $1400 per month.

Now, is that possible? It absolutely is. Is it easy? Absolutely not, you're certainly not going to be going out to the
bar and buying beers or going out to dinner,
you're probably going to be living in a tiny apartment driving an old car and eating at home for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. But if that type of
sacrifice is worth it to you for the long term picture, it is something you may
be willing to do yourself. So each year you would
be saving and investing a staggering amount of money, which is 70% of your take home pay
or just over a $39,000. And that is how you would
be able to pull this off, and assuming you kept that
cost of living the same at around $16,000, just over 16,000. your freedom number, or 30
times your annual expenses, would be just over $506,000. So, how long would it take
you to save up that money? Let's go ahead and answer that now.

Well if you took that
$39,375 per year of money that you are saving and
invested in the stock market, earning 8% return, and
as we said, historically, it's an eight to 10% so we're going to go on the conservative side, well in 10 years at 8%
return career you would have $570,408.40, meaning you could then, if you kept those living
expenses the same, following that 4% rule, not have to work for your
money past that point.

And just to circle back
guys what this really comes down to is the level
of sacrifice involved. Are you really willing to live
off of about $1400 per month, or do you want to have vacations and going out to get dinner
and things like that? So it's not people who are doing this that are out there traveling and dining it's people that are living
as frugal as possible and finding enjoyment
in other areas of life other than just, you know,
spending money on dining and things like that. Now, is this a strategy I
would personally follow? Probably not because I
am one of those people that enjoys traveling, I enjoy dining, and I do spend a little bit
more than the average person, so my freedom number would be
multiple millions of dollars, but instead I follow the
strategy of earning as much as possible and saving a
lot of that earned money, and then eventually allowing
that to supplement my income by having that interest
or the growth of my money paying for a lot of
those things that I want.

And believe it or not,
guys, there are honestly countless people out
there that have followed this exact strategy and
retired at 30 or less. One of the most well known people being Mr. Money Mustache, he has a whole blog where he documented this whole journey of becoming financially
independent and retiring early with both him and his wife. So I'm going to link up his blog down in the description below
as well as a couple of other stories about
people who have followed this exact strategy and
retired at 30 or less. So that's going to wrap
up this video guys, thanks so much for watching. If you're new to this channel, make sure you subscribe and
hit that bell for notifications so you don't miss future videos, and I hope to see you in the next one..

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6 Retirement Essentials (Most people only prepared 2 or 3)

I'm planning for retirement most people focus 
mostly on marshaling together enough money you   know Financial Resources so that they can last 
the distance and then maybe at the back of their   heads they have some vague plan right perhaps 
two or three things to fill the time with a lot   of the times this is stuff like travel family 
well unfortunately I'm gonna say that's not   quite nearly enough for Preparation we ourselves 
have been retired for two years and going looking   back on the past two years I kind of see like 
six essential things that if you prep for it   beforehand before your retirement starts I think 
this can really make such a positive difference   to your retirement so that's what I wanted 
to bring up and discuss with you guys today   number one first and foremost of course we have 
to talk about money most people's concern is the   amount of money that they have in retirement 
whether it will last them till the end come   comfortably and allow them to afford the Hobbies 
like travel good food Etc but I actually think   after going through the last two years building up 
our financial Acumen is just as important if not   more so what do I mean by Financial Acumen I mean 
stuff like budgeting tracking projecting investing   I mean if you think about it the money in your 
bank account can always be squandered we all   know that story I think more importantly what's 
going to make your retirement more fireproof is   having an ability to generate more money where 
it came from in the first place so the second   essential thing that you can prepare for so that 
you have a wonderful retirement it's definitely   the ability to be self-directing and disciplined 
self-direction definitely helps so much with   spending your retirement days meaningfully right 
after all there are no more like work schedules   or like demands from colleagues or bosses to help 
shape your days anymore you have to be the person   to take charge in retirement there's a study out 
there actually that shows that for happily retired   folks most of them actually have about 3.6 core 
Pursuits that's what they say and the unheably   retired folks tend to have less than 3.6 corporate 
suits coming in at about 1.9 call Pursuits that's   what the study reflected I guess it kind of just 
shows in retirement you really need to fill your   life to the brim and keep busy with activities 
you love and that is a really great formula for   happiness and self-direction will help you 
to achieve that state as well as discipline   because if you think about it like discipline 
directly affects the state of your finances right   it affects whether you stick with your retirement 
planning whether you keep fit and active and you   get to maintain your health in retirement even 
whilst you're left up to your own devices even   to find your cover suits if you don't have any 
when you're starting or in your retirement so   discipline and self-direction will be like 
the building blocks for enjoying your life   in retirement the third essential thing you might 
want to work on and cultivate or happy retirement   is people skills right so studies and research 
have reflected very consistently that the main   determining factor for happiness and Longevity 
for most of us is actually relationships Human   Relationships friendships relationship with 
your spouse and with your family I guess if   you look at most of us you know we all have 
a little need of work on some social skills   in some aspect I mean some of us are a bit shy 
paper hats or graph or maybe socially anxious   working on our people skills really will help us 
to get along and live happily with our spouse and   family members and also importantly to make 
new friendships at whatever age we all know   that making new friends gets a lot more difficult 
as we get older I mean I haven't heard anyone say   otherwise for me personally making new friends 
as I get older is the biggest challenge there's   this huge feeling that nothing can replace 
friendships with people who have known you   all your life but it is also a challenge as I 
have chosen to exercise through Arbitrage in   our retirement and we've moved away from home 
so those friends aren't with us in our present   I find that it takes a lot of intention I have 
to consciously push myself to broaden my Social   Circles and make the effort to get to know people 
on a more intimate basis I am also very happy   to be able to say that it has paid off in that for 
the last two years in Bali I have actually made   two or three new friends that I'm happy to say are 
kindred spirits and not just social acquaintances   so that's very nice and it's a huge Comfort to our 
daily life here in a foreign land away from home   now before we move on a big thank you to 
Mumu Singapore for sponsoring this video   Singapore is an online trading platform for 
stocks ETFs and options I've been using the   MooMoo mobile trading app myself for almost 
a year now and I think it's awesome it's   fast intuitive trading US Stocks is commission 
free plus they give free level to data and many   more perks now for a limited time when you open a 
Mumu Singapore Universal account they'll give you   a year of commission free trading of Singapore 
stocks ETFs and reads if you're trading us and   Singapore stocks just switching to the MooMoo 
app will save you so much money already when   you deposit at least a hundred same dollars and 
start using the mobile app to trade you stand   to receive cash coupons up to 128 Sing dollars 
and even a free Coca-Cola share worth around 87   subscribe two thousand Sing dollars or more into 
funds on the MooMoo fun Hub and MooMoo will give   you cash coupons up to 150 Sing dollars subscribe 
at least 100 Sing dollar us to Momo cache plus   and they'll throw in an additional tensing 
dollars cashback altogether that's 368 Sing   dollars worth of Welcome rewards absolutely free 
just for using the Momo app so if you're actively   investing anyhow I recommend checking out the 
MooMoo ad using my link in the description below   now back to the video the fourth essential 
thing that you can definitely work on and that   will benefit your retirement tremendously it's 
actually courage you're definitely gonna need lots   of courage in retirement and I guess this isn't 
a skill exactly it's kind of more of a quality   but in retirement you need a lot of courage 
to even plunge into retirement you need the   courage to you know take that leap of faith to 
stop putting it off due to fear of the unknown   feel or financial insecurities so then it's all 
about courage at that stage not let fear and   insecurity rule your life and your decisions it 
is also the courage to recognize that in life at   the start at the end in the middle the Domino's 
you need are never all nicely lined up you know   at some point you just got to jump into it and 
then learn to cross the obstacles as they come   so for retirement long term I guess the 
biggest issue most commonly is always money   but my perspective on this is that hey budgets 
can always be reduced money can always be earned   or recouped or whatever happens so I still 
think that you know it is actually beneficial   to Advocate an approach whereby you get to 
a point where you feel that you have most of   your Ducks lined up you've planned well you've 
prepped for it grab hold of your courage with   both hands and then take the plunge people tend 
to think of retirement as the end but it's not   it's the start of a new phase where you should be 
trying so many new things new Pursuits new ways   to live and for each of these new adventures 
you're gonna need courage to take action and   once you have taken the plunge you'll find the 
next fifth thing very very useful and that would   be a mentality of resilience especially in early 
retirement there are a lot more decades ahead of   you you know and therefore a lot more chances that 
they things can go wrong whether it be down to bad   financial planning or perhaps an unexpected Health 
catastrophe or even sometimes natural disasters   whatever comes I guess you will always need that 
strength of Will and the resilience so that you   can roll with the punches and then get back up 
you want to know that you have the mental strength   that even if things go pear-shaped you won't just 
give up and lose hope and certain Corner you've   got to Marshall what you've got inside you go out 
there find Solutions perhaps if necessary you've   got to go back to work but know that later on 
you can return to retirement and try again so the   sex essential thing that I believe will benefit 
everyone in retirement is to cultivate an attitude   of gratitude we all know life is a very long 
journey hopefully at least and so much of what   we Chase using most of our years actually doesn't 
really matter in the big picture once you have   taken a step back and then at that point is when 
you start realizing the earlier you cultivate and   attitude of gratitude and that appreciation for 
the simple little things that are probably around   you everywhere every day the happier you probably 
will be and it sounds silly but it's not really   automatic I mean we all live and grow up and 
work and go to school in a society that kind of   innovates us with messages that we need to reach 
for more have more ambition gives us you know that   High definitions of success in life that we 
have to try to jump to reach and nobody sings   the Praises of the pleasures of a simple cup of 
tea you know the importance of family time with   your loved ones or or just the pleasure of being 
able to take an evening walk on the beach with   your dog so I think that it's very important that 
somebody reminds you that you know you can not   overload what you already have what you're already 
surrounded by growing that muscle of appreciation   so that in each and every moment you are present 
in your own life you see all the little Joys that   you're surrounded with every day and if you 
live life like that I think that will help   you achieve contentment with just the small stuff 
around you and that's what majority of your life   in retirement may be about is just a small stuff 
every day but in my own retirement here in Bali it   is what makes me so grateful and so happy every 
day that I am surrounded by my loving husband   and very interesting and independent little dog 
that's very very cute you know that we have very   comfortable a bit simple house we have the ability 
to enjoy good food even if it's simple stuff   from the war rooms locally we have a garden and 
beautiful things are growing around us every day   the weather is great you know stuff is good yeah 
I think this is one of the most essential simple   things that's often overlooked simply because it's 
a matter of mentality but I believe this essential   quality or characteristic could make all the 
difference for you so these are the six essential   things that I believe are very very important for 
you to cultivate and prepare for in the leader to   actually taking the plunge into a return then I 
think that if you have these six strong skills and   qualities going for you you will be in a position 
much more well placed to make the best out of your   retirement however long that period may be let me 
know what you think of my suggestions whether you   agree or if you think they suck let me know why 
but in any event I really appreciate you tuning   in and sharing my thoughts for this week and 
wherever you are in the world I'm wishing you   a happy Saturday evening and let's speak again 
next week till then you take care and bye for now

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